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20 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Mass Observation Archive: a UK social history writing project

"The Mass Observation Project (MOP) is a unique UK–based writing project which has been running since 1981. ... [it] differs from other similar social investigations because of its historical link to the original Mass Observation and because of its focus is on voluntary, self–motivated participation. It revives the early Mass Observation notion that everyone can participate in creating their own history or social science. The Mass Observers do not constitute a statistically representative sample of the population but can be seen as reporters or 'citizen journalists' who provide a window on their worlds.

The material is solicited in response to 'directives' or open–ended questions sent to them by post or email three times a year. The directives contain two or three broad themes which cover both very personal issues and wider political and social issues and events.

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TAGS

1937198120th century21st century • Charles Madge • citizen journalismconfessioncultural heritagediagramdiary • directives • drawingseventseveryday lifehistorical archiveshistorical chronicles • Humphrey Jennings • letterslistlongitudinal studymapMass Observation Project (MOP)material culture • memoir • open-ended questionsopinion • ordinary people • personal experiencephotographsplacespolitical issuesposterity • press cutting • qualitative researchresearch resourcesself knowledge • self-identity • self-revelationsocial historysocial issuessocial researchstatistically representative samplestoriessubjectivitytheir storiesthematic patterns • Tom Harrisson • UK • University of Sussex • voluntary participationwriting project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2012

Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching, the 2nd annual HEA Arts and Humanities conference, 2013

Date: 29 May 2013 – 30 May 2013

Location/venue: Thistle Brighton, King's Road, Brighton, England, BN1 2GS

The Higher Education Academy's second annual learning and teaching Arts and Humanities conference, 'Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching' will take place on 29–30 May 2013 in Brighton.

"At the heart of the Arts and Humanities disciplines sit stories–stories which create and recreate worlds, distant and present, stories which inspire and engage, stories which grow imaginations and expand what is thinkable.

Stories are everywhere, and our second annual conference seeks to explore the intersections between narrative and learning and teaching..."

(Higher Education Academy, UK)

TAGS

2013academic identitiesanthologyarchivearts and humanities • assessing creatively • conference • create and recreate worlds • creating stories • curricula designdesigning learning experiencesdisciplinary boundarieseducator • experimental forms • gamifyinggamifying learning and teachingHannah ArendtHEHEAHigher Education Academy • how students learn • how we teach • inspire and engage • Key Information Set (KIS)learning and teachinglearning storiesliterary devicesmetaphormetaphorical representationnaming processnarrative account • narrative and learning • narrative co-creation • narrative framingnarratives of discovery • narratives we teach by • National Student Survey • our stories • pedagogypractice narrativesrehearsal • research-based teaching • sharing stories • social presence • stories • storyville • student journey • students as partners • teaching and learning • teaching methodologies • teaching-based research • telling storiestravelogue • tweeting • tweetsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2012

LUDOLOGY MEETS NARRATOLOGY: Similitude and differences between (video)games and narrative

"Literary theory and narratology have been helpful to understand cybertexts and videogames. Aristotelian Poetics [Laurel, 1993], Russian formalism [Porush and Hivner, ?], and poststructuralism [Landow, 1992] are some of the different perspectives that have been used to study the subject.

Some authors see cybertexts and videogames as a new form of or as an expansion of traditional narrative or drama. The fact is that these computer programs share many elements with stories: characters, chained actions, endings, settings.

However, there is another dimension that has been usually almost ignored when studying this kind of computer software: to analyze them as games.

The problems of using a 'game' perspective are many. Basically, traditional games have always had less academic status than other objects, like narrative. And because of this, game formalist studies are fragmented through different disciplines, and not very well developed.

In this paper we will propose to explore videogames and cybertexts as games. Our intention is not to replace the narratologic approach, but to complement it. We want to better understand what is the relationship with narrative and videogames; their similarities and differences."

(Gonzalo Frasca, 1999)

Frasca, Gonzalo (1999) 'Ludology Meets Narratology. Similitude and Differences between (Video)games and Narrative'. Originally published in Finnish in Parnasso 1999: 3, 365–71.

TAGS

1999 • Albert Sidney Hornby • Andre Lalande • Aristotelian Poetics • Aristotles Poetics • Brenda Laurelcausalitycausally relatedcausally related narrative events • chained actions • character • Claude Bremond • computer programme • computer software • cybertext • cybertexts • Daniel Vidart • David Porush • ending • Espen AarsethFILE (festival) • game formalist studies • game perspective • game studiesgame theorygames • George Landow • Gerald Prince • Gonzalo Frasca • Jean Piagetliterary theory • ludology • narrative and videogames • narratologic approach • narratologynew form • Oswald Ducrot • post-structuralism • Roger Caillois • Roland Barthes • Russian formalism • Schaeffer Jean-Marie • setting • similarities and differences • stories • studying games • Todd Hivnor • traditional drama • traditional narrative • Umberto Ecovideo gamevideogames

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2011

Narratives for Europe: Launderette

"Imagine that you have just got home late from a long day of work only to be confronted by an endless list of chores. You drag yourself and an old bag of dirty clothes to the laundromat around the corner. Suddenly some young film–maker is putting a camera in your face and asking you about your laundry, your life and your ever–fading childhood dreams. At first you want to be left alone–get out of my face! But after a while you relax. It feels good to talk and it feels good to listen. On your way home, you keep thinking about the stories you told and the ones you heard. Your mind just keeps on spinning...

The scenario of the short film 'Laundrette' transforms an anonymous public space into a dynamic one where stories are swapped and strangers are given faces. The film also acts as a remarkable metaphor for what Narratives for Europe wants to become: an open space where significant stories can be voiced, echoed and debated. Selected from the media collection of ECF's Youth and Media programme, 'Laundrette' was awarded 'Best Documentary' at the BFI Futures Film Festival 2011 in London. You can watch this film and other shorts on ECF's VIMEOchannel.

The BFI recruited this video and is one of the 6 partners of the Doc Next Network. This network functions as the core of the Youth & Media Programme of the European Cultural Foundation (ECF). Doc Next is a unique movement of independent cultural and media organisations working with young people and media in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland, Turkey and Scandinavia."

(European Cultural Foundation)

"Launderette": Director – Bertie Telezynski, Producer – Johnny Orme, Producer – Mark Davies, Cinematographer – Alex Nevill, Cinematographer – Rachel Lewis, Editor – Louis Rossi, Sound – Liam Cook

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TAGS

2011 • ambition • anonymous public space • auteurBFI • BFI Futures Film Festival • broken relationships • camera in your face • childhood • childhood dreams • childhood memories • chores • confrontational stories • desolate space • Doc Next Network • documentaryECFEuropeEuropean Cultural Foundationexistential insightfilmfilmmaker • fragmented memories • human conditionimaginative stories • independent cultural and media organisations • late night • launderette • laundrette • Laundrette (film) • laundroma • laundromat • laundry • long day of work • lost family • mediamemorymoments • moments of personal insight • Narratives for Europe • Netherlandsopen spacePolandpublic spacereflection • reflexive documentary • Scandinaviashort film • significant stories • Spainstoriesstrangersstring theory • swap • TurkeyUK • young film-maker • young people • your life • Youth and Media • Youth and Media Programme

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

An interactive system defines a virtual space

"An interactive system defines a virtual space, whether the system's interface provides access to the inhospitable planet of Stroggos or the Microsoft Windows desktop. Users of both these systems interact with a place, one created by a computer and in which users and computational agents carry out their individual and collective activities. The intuitive and often–discussed benefit of a well–designed interface metaphor is that it allows users to carry over conventions from their 'real' experience when performing tasks within the interface world.

Another key and often unarticulated value of an interface arises from the interface's mimetic quality. While mimesis is often discussed by narrative theorists as a contrast to diegesis, distinguishing the concepts of showing versus telling (Aristotle), my emphasis here is to distinguish between an artifact that is intended to be an imitation of something, but is not really that thing and an artifact that is intended to be mistaken as that thing. An example of the former case would be a film of a fictional account of the D–Day landing on the beaches of Normandy. An example of the later might be a virtual reality system displaying photo–realistic graphical images of a physical space. D–Days stories like The Longest Day and Saving Private Ryan are, in some ways, imitations, and so are more mimetic than VR systems whose design is intended to '...produce synthetic images visually and measurably indistinguishable from real world images.' (Greenberg 1999)(pg. 45)."

(R. Michael Young, 1999)

Greenberg, D. P. 1999. 'A framework for realistic image synthesis'. Communications of the ACM 42(8):45–53.

1). R. Michael Young (1999). 'Notes on the Use of Plan Structures in the Creation of Interactive Plot', Papers from the 1999 Fall Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Symposium

TAGS

1999 • AAAI • AristotleAssociation for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence • computational agents • conventionsD-Day landingdesktop metaphordiegesis • Donald P. Greenberg • fictional account • graphical images • image synthesis • imitation of something • imitations • interact with a place • interactive narrative • interactive system • interface metaphor • interface world • intuitiveMicrosoft Windowsmimesis • mimetic quality • mistaken as that thing • narrative theory • Normandy • performing tasks • photo-realistic • physical space • real experience • real world images • realism • Saving Private Ryan • showing • stories • Stroggos • synthetic images • telling • The Longest Day • usersvirtual heritagevirtual realityvirtual reality systemvirtual space • VR systems • WWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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