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Which clippings match 'Mystery' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 OCTOBER 2011

Rabbits: three rabbits live with a fearful mystery

"In a nameless city, deluged by a continuous rain, three rabbits live with a fearful mystery. Rabbits is a 9 episode sitcom featuring Naomi Watts, Laura Elena Harring, and Scott Coffey."

(LynchNet)

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TAGS

2002anthropomorphism • anti-realist aesthetics • apartmentbizarre • continuous rain • daily lifeDavid Lynchdehumanisationdistanced viewpointdistanciation • episodic • hare • humanoid rabbits • in and out • independent cinemaironing • Laura Elena Harring • mise-en-scenemystery • nameless city • Naomi Wattsotherworldlinessplacenessproscenium archrabbit • Rabbits (2002) • scene • Scott Coffey • series of episodes • sitcom • sitting on a couch • solo singing • strangestrangenesssurrealist filmmakertheatrical space • three rabbits • unnatural roomvisual designweird

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2011

Niebla: short film about a village forgotten amid the fog

"As in Gabriel Garcia Marquez's magic–realist novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, Niebla's precise setting is uncertain–somewhere in rural Latin America–and the story's narrator is El Pep, an old man being interviewed in his living room by a documentary film crew about the mysterious fog of the title and the resulting visitation by a strange flock of flying sheep. 'The character is strongly based on my grandmother,' Ramos says. 'She was a very complex person, with many frustrations in life. She was born during the Mexican Revolution, so she experienced a lack of material possessions all her life. But she was also very kind and loving with her family (well..., most of the time). She was a combination of marked strenghs and weaknesses. At the end of her life, she suffered from dementia. 'My mind is leaving me,' she used to say, distressed, when she noticed. The only moments we could communicate with her were when we asked her about her past life. Those memories were the last to vanish.'"

(Emilio Ramos)

Fig.1 Emilio Ramos (2006). 'Niebla (Fog)', Short Film | México–Spain | 8 min. | 2d/3d digital

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TAGS

20062D3DAfter EffectsanimationBarcelonacharactercompositingdementia • El Pep • Emilio Ramos • film crew • flying sheep • fog • Gabriel Garcia Marquez • illustrationillustrative styleinterview • Jordi Codina • Latin America • Leo Heiblum • living room • Maria del Mar Hernandez • material possessions • memory • Mexican Revolution • Mexicomysteriousmystery • Niebla • old man • One Hundred Years of Solitude • ruralshort filmvillagevisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 JANUARY 2009

Newton’s apple tree might also imbue a sense of mystery

"A falling apple is supposed to have inspired Newton's theory of universal gravitation, a simple chance observation in his back garden that helped, even in a small way, to shape the way we understand our place in the cosmos. The story was perhaps invented by Newton himself so that he could claim his very own eureka moment, but whether or not it truly is the origin of his theory, the falling apple has come to be a simple yet powerful illustration of his thinking. So potent is the story that now, over 300 years later, a number of gardens claim to have the actual tree that dropped Newton's apple, while the Brogdale National Fruit Collection in the United Kingdom holding the license to sell grafts of one of these Newton trees–which it curiously describes as 'a very shy cropper.' Does it make any difference to our understanding of the world to see the original tree or watch one of its apples fall for ourselves? Not really, but an artefact like this develops an important gravitational pull of its own–a sense that we are being pulled closer to the essence of things. Perhaps though, the apple tree also serves as a gentle reminder that we can never really know what happened for Newton that day in the garden, no matter how close we stand to it. So much of a research process tends to go unseen, and even then there are parts of that process that are impossible to document, or are best kept unsaid. In ways that might not be possible for a thesis or a paper, an object that symbolises as much as Newton's apple tree might also imbue a sense of mystery–stories might be grafted on to it, but the simple silence of the tree itself can be a reflection of the quieter moments that helped contribute to this new knowledge."
(Nicholas Spratt)

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TAGS

Aotearoa New Zealand • Archimedes • discovery • eureka moment • falling apple • gallery • graft • gravityinventionIsaac Newtonmysteryreflectionstories

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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