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Which clippings match 'Royal College Of Art' keyword pg.1 of 4
04 JUNE 2015

Speculating about technologically saturated consumerist spaces

"Digital technologies were born out of and have become fundamental to the processes of global capitalism in terms of production, finance, media and entertainment, extracting data and surveying its insatiable technoconsumers whilst simultaneously presenting itself in the guise of augmentation."

(Andre Sampaio Kong)

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2013 • Andre Sampaio Kong • augmentative communication • augmented architecture • augmented choreography • augmented spacebringing into relationdesign student project • dextracting • digital technologies • digitised lives • global capitalismgraphical overlaygraphical visualisationshypermediated space • MA Architecture programme • Ming Kong • pervasive advertisingphysical worldRoyal College of Artsigns of mediation • simultaneous presence • speculative design • technoconsumerism • technoconsumerist spaces • technologically saturated consumerist spaces • urban informatics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming

"Today designers often focus on making technology easy to use, sexy, and consumable. In Speculative Everything, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby propose a kind of design that is used as a tool to create not only things but ideas. For them, design is a means of speculating about how things could be–to imagine possible futures. This is not the usual sort of predicting or forecasting, spotting trends and extrapolating; these kinds of predictions have been proven wrong, again and again. Instead, Dunne and Raby pose 'what if' questions that are intended to open debate and discussion about the kind of future people want (and do not want).

Speculative Everything offers a tour through an emerging cultural landscape of design ideas, ideals, and approaches. Dunne and Raby cite examples from their own design and teaching and from other projects from fine art, design, architecture, cinema, and photography. They also draw on futurology, political theory, the philosophy of technology, and literary fiction. They show us, for example, ideas for a solar kitchen restaurant; a flypaper robotic clock; a menstruation machine; a cloud–seeding truck; a phantom–limb sensation recorder; and devices for food foraging that use the tools of synthetic biology. Dunne and Raby contend that if we speculate more–about everything–reality will become more malleable. The ideas freed by speculative design increase the odds of achieving desirable futures."

(Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, 2013)

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2013alternative visionsAnthony Dunne • Belgrade • Belgrade New Media Festival • Charles Avery • conceptual designdesign approachesdesign idealsdesign ideasDesign Interactions (MA) • desirable futures • emerging cultural landscape • extrapolating • Fiona Raby • Frederik Pohl • future contextsfuture forecastingfuturology • how things could be • ictional scenarios • idealism • ideas freed by speculative design • interaction design • literary fiction • Michio Kaku • modelling possible realities • new media festival • open debate and discussion • philosophy of technologyPhysics of the Impossible (2008)political theory • possible futures • potential futures • predictions • Resonate festival • Royal College of Art • scenario building • sci-fiscience fiction • social dreaming • speculative design • Speculative Everything Design (2013) • speculative fictionsuspend disbelief • the future people want • Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance • we speculate • what if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

UK start-up product design agency Made In Mind

"Made in Mind was founded in 2009 by Matthew Judkins and Min–Kyu Choi. The duo met on the campuses of Imperial College and the Royal College of Art and formed the company to commercialise the Folding Plug design concept that Min–Kyu developed during his studies. Numerous individuals and organisations joined Matthew and Min–Kyu along the way to contribute to the development, funding and marketing of the concept which was realised in 2012 with the launch of the Mu. Made in Mind, now consisting of a diverse team of industry and technical professionals, are in the process of extending the product pipeline and placing the Mu on the global stage."

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2009AC power plugadapterscommercialisationcompact designdesign conceptdesign innovation • folding plug • Imperial College Londonindustrial designMA Product Design • Made in Mind • Matthew Judkins • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • Mu USB Charger • product designredesignRoyal College of Artstart-up businessUK • USB Smartphone charger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Neville Brody: removal of design from school curriculum is 'insanity'

"plans to remove creative subjects from the UK curriculum are 'short–sighted insanity', according to incoming D&AD president Neville Brody (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen, Brody described government plans to overhaul the curriculum as 'one of the biggest mistakes in British government' and added: 'The UK government is trying to demolish and smash all ideas about creative education.'

In September, education secretary Michael Gove announced plans to replace GCSE examinations for students up to the age of 16 with a new English baccalaureate (EBacc) system. Creative subjects such as art and design will not count towards the EBacc qualifications, which instead are graded on performance in academic 'stem' subjects. These stem subjects are English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language. ...

'The creative industries need high–quality creative graduates. If we're not getting the graduates, we're not going to sustain the industry,' said Brody. 'Creative services as a percentage of GDP is higher here than any other country, so why would you not want to support, promote and build that?'"

(Dezeen, 26 November 2012)

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2012Andrew Marrart and designart schools • arts students • British Government • creative education • creative graduates • creative industriescreative professionscreative servicescreative subjectsD and ADdesign curriculumDezeenEBacceducation budgetEnglish BaccalaureateGCSE • GDP • graphic design agency • Michael GoveNeville Brody • non-UK students • overseas students • Research Studios (agency) • Royal College of Art • school of communication • skilled dangerous minds • STEM • studying arts • UKUK Governmentvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Treweek
22 NOVEMBER 2012

The creative industries provided twice as many UK jobs as financial services

"This Monday, [Andrew] Marr hosted a special edition of Start the Week on BBC Radio 4 to celebrate the RCA's 175th anniversary with guests including former RCA rector and Arts Council chair Sir Christopher Frayling.

In the show, Frayling pointed out that the creative industries provided twice as many UK jobs as financial services, but that this contribution went unnoticed.

'What I never understand is, there are so many column inches about financial services all the time,' Frayling told Marr. 'Financial services contributes about 1% more than the creative industries, which employ two million people whereas financial services employ one million people. So in terms of contribution to the economy generally, the creative industries actually have it over financial services in almost every way. And how many column inches about it? Very little. So there's this huge impact but people don't seem to be noticing.'

In his article, Marr argues that because the economic value of art schools is difficult to measure, politicians fail to appreciate their importance to the economy.

'And there's where I think the trouble lies,' Marr concludes. 'To invest in art and design means putting public money into areas whose value cannot be captured on a spreadsheet, where concepts like productivity, value–for–money, inputs and outputs–which so reassure the political world–simply collapse. That means faith. It means risk.

'But, without it, hard times surely stretch out rather bleakly. Other countries understand this, including China where more than a thousand art and design colleges are operating and whose students greatly benefit from colleges here too."

(Dezeen, 21 November 2012)

Fig.1 Jim Rokos "22° 36° 48°", fruit bowl [http://rokos.co.uk/].

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175th anniversary2012Andrew Marrart and designart schoolsArts Council (UK)BBC Radio 4Christopher Frayling • creative contribution • creative economycreative industries • difficult to measure • economic valuefinancial servicesimpact on the economy • importance to the economy • inputs and outputs • invest in art and design • jobsPeoples Republic of China • political world • productivitypublic moneyRCA • reassurance • riskRoyal College of ArtStart the WeekUKvalue and benefitvalue for money

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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