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Which clippings match 'Robert Putnam' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 APRIL 2014

YouTube: new forms of community, expression, identity, interaction

"This is the third lecture in a series titled 'Digital Natives,' referring to the generation that has been raised with the computer as a natural part of their lives, especially the young people who are currently in schools and colleges today. The series seeks to understand the practices and culture of the digital natives, the cultural implications of their phenomenon and the implications for education to schools, universities and libraries.

According to Wesch, it took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after humans spoke their first words. It took thousands more before the printing press appeared and a few hundred again before the telegraph did. Today a new medium of communication emerges every time somebody creates a new web application. 'A Flickr here, a Twitter there, and a new way of relating to others emerges,' Wesch said. 'New types of conversation, argumentation and collaborations are realized.'

Enter YouTube, which is not just a technology. 'It's a social space built around video communication that is searchable, taggable and mashable,' Wesch said. 'It is a space where identities, values and ideas are produced, reproduced, challenged and negotiated in new ways.'"

(Library of Congress, 22 May 2008)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, 23 June 2008, Library of Congress [http://mediatedcultures.net/]

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2008amateur cultural production • anthenticity crisis • anthropologyappropriation • AtheneWins • authenticity • Bomb Iran (song) • Charlie Bit My Finger (2007) • Chevrolet Tahoe • Chevycollaborative productioncommunication mediumcommunity building • connection without constraint • context collapse • cultural anthenticity • demassified mediadigital ethnographydigital nativedigital texts • Dragostea Din Tei • fakesterflash frameFlickr • gaming the system • Gary Brolsma • global connectivity • Hi YouTube • home videohuman interaction • identity negotiation • identity performanceidentity production • illumistream • individualism • Kansas State University • Lawrence LessigLibrary of Congress • LisaNova • LonelyGirl15 • MadV • Marshall McLuhanmedia culture • media ecology • mediascapemediated culturememeMichael Weschnetworked individualismnetworked production • new forms of community • new forms of expression • new forms of identity • new forms of interactionnew media • new types of conversation • new ways of engaging • new ways of relating to others • Numa Numa (video) • participant observationparticipatory mediaprinting press • re-taking identity • reappropriation • Regina Spektor • remix cultureremixingRobert Putnam • seriously playful participatory media culture • sharingsocial space • Soulja Boy (video) • telegraph • user-generated content • video communication • video lecturevideo sharingvlogweb applicationwebcamYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
03 JANUARY 2004

Bowling Alone: Governance and Civic Engagement

"The norms and networks of civic engagement also powerfully affect the performance of representative government. That, at least, was the central conclusion of my own 20–year, quasi–experimental study of subnational governments in different regions of Italy [3]. Although all these regional governments seemed identical on paper, their levels of effectiveness varied dramatically. Systematic inquiry showed that the quality of governance was determined by longstanding traditions of civic engagement (or its absence). Voter turnout, newspaper readership, membership in choral societies and football clubs––these were the hallmarks of a successful region. In fact, historical analysis suggested that these networks of organized reciprocity and civic solidarity, far from being an epiphenomenon of socioeconomic modernization, were a precondition for it. ...

For a variety of reasons, life is easier in a community blessed with a substantial stock of social capital. In the first place, networks of civic engagement foster sturdy norms of generalized reciprocity and encourage the emergence of social trust. Such networks facilitate coordination and communication, amplify reputations, and thus allow dilemmas of collective action to be resolved. When economic and political negotiation is embedded in dense networks of social interaction, incentives for opportunism are reduced. At the same time, networks of civic engagement embody past success at collaboration, which can serve as a cultural template for future collaboration. Finally, dense networks of interaction probably broaden the participants' sense of self, developing the 'I' into the 'we,' or (in the language of rational–choice theorists) enhancing the participants' 'taste' for collective benefits."

(Robert Putnam, Journal of Democracy 6:1, Jan 1995, 65–78)

Robert Putnam (1993). "Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital", Journal of Democracy 6.1 65-78.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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