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Which clippings match 'ICA' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 JANUARY 2015

Allen Jones: the pop artist whose transgressions went too far

"Jones explains the situation, as he sees it. 'For artists of my generation, coming on stream in the Sixties, whatever you did you had to reckon with American gestural abstraction. The problem with figurative art at the time was that it had run out of steam, but the polemic was that you couldn't do it any more, which seemed absurd after 4,000 years of people making representations of each other. To me the Pop movement was incontrovertibly a swing of the pendulum back towards representation. The problem wasn't with representation, it was the age–old one – with the language. And the language had run out of steam. Using urban imagery as source material revitalised figurative painting, without a doubt. And recently the main thrust of the avant–garde from Basquiat and Schnabel up to Koons and company has been figuration with a vengeance.'"

(Andrew Lambirth 1 November 2014, The Spectator)

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TAGS

1960s1969 • accepted canons • Allen JonesBritish artist • Chair (1969) • controversydeliberately offensive • demonised figure • female figure • figuration • figurative art • figurative painting • figurative sculptor • figurative work • fine artflat colourflat surfacefurniture • Hat Stand (1969) • human bodyICA • in the wilderness • Jean-Michel Basquiat • Jeff Koons • Julian Schnabel • leather boots • made to offendmannequin • ostracised • outrage • piece of furniture • political correctitude • political correctness • politically correct • pop art • pop artist • provocative art • realistic representation • representational art • retrospective exhibitionscantily cladsculpturesexist • sexually provocative • Table (1969) • tabootransgression • unwritten taboo • urban imagery • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2011

Comica: London International Comics Festival

"Since 2003 the Comica Festival has been dedicated to showcasing the best of the comics medium through a series of comics–related events centered [sic] around the ICA and other London venues. The Comica Festival is held during the months of October and/or November each year."

(Comica, 2011)

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TAGS

20032011 • Charlie Adlard • comic bookComica • Comica Comiket • comicsdrawing • drawing parade • Ed Pinsent • Escape Books • Gary Northfield • ICAillustrationillustratorLondon • London International Comics Festival • online comic • Paul Duffield • Paul Gravett • penciller • Peter Stanbury • sketchUKvisual language • webcomic

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2009

Media art is cross-cutting and doesn't fit neatly into any one clear genre or medium of creative arts practice

"Media art is cross–cutting. It doesn't fit into any one clear genre or medium of creative arts practice. In its broadest sense, media art can occur across visual, performance, sound, video, computer, game, networked, activist, site specific, animation, mobile, AI and Net Art. It can both embrace and subvert conventional art practices. As a result, many artists that work under the 'Media Art,' umbrella don't necessarily recognise themselves as connected in any way. They hold different creative interests, they work in wildly different ways and explore distinct areas of media form, process and subject. Some even find the term 'Media Art,' unhelpful and old fashioned."

(Claire Welsby, InterventTech.net)

[Part of an impassioned plea for support/recognition for Live and Media Arts in the UK. It follows on from an email by Ekow Eshun announcing the closure of the ICA's Live and Media Arts Department.]

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TAGS

activismAIartistic practice • Claire Welsby • communication designconstellationsconvergence • creative arts practice • digital media • Ekow Eshun • ICAinteractive mediainterdisciplinary • Live and Media Arts Department • media artmultidisciplinarymultimedianet art • networked art • new mediaperformancepraxisUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2006

Pioneering Event: Cybernetic Serendipity 1968

"To return to Computerized Haiku is to return to the early days not only of computerised art and literature but also of computing and the still relatively new science of cybernetics. Cybernetic Serendipity, held at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London in 1968, was the first major exhibition of computer art (although there had been several earlier exhibitions of computer graphics). [1] Cybernetic Serendipity was unusual in many ways. Scientists mixed with artists and no rigid distinction was made between visual art and literature. [2] In those days everything must have seemed possible and most things still to be done. Looking back from our vantage point, it is possible to observe how much is different ? and what may seem the same."
(Wayne Clements, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London, UK)

[1] Reichardt, J. (ed.) (1968), Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts, a Studio International special issue. London: Studio International.

[2] There is a list of Addresses of Major Contributors To Cybernetic Serendipity in the Tate archive, London. The contributors of text pieces, including Masterman and McKinnon–Wood, are listed under graphics (the other categories are music, film and machines.)

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