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Which clippings match 'Artistic Practice' keyword pg.1 of 11
01 JULY 2014

The art object does not embody a form of knowledge

"In this paper, I start from the position that the proper goal of visual arts research is visual art. An alternative position is that the art making process yields knowledge that is independent of the actual art objects produced. However, this relegates the art object to that of a by–product of the knowledge acquisition process, and, in my view, places visual art making in the service of some other discipline. Notwithstanding the fact that valuable knowledge may be acquired in this way, from my standpoint it would be undesirable for this to become the dominant mode of arts research. Therefore, from my position the most interesting proposition to explore is the claim that the art object is a form of knowledge since it locates the art object as a central and fundamental component of the knowledge acquisition process.

Nevertheless, as you will see, in this paper I argue against this proposition. I will not claim that the visual art object cannot communicate knowledge–it can. Instead, I will argue that this knowledge is typically of a superficial nature and cannot account for the deep insights that art is usually thought to endow into emotions, human nature and relationships, and our place in the World, etc. In short, I aim to demonstrate that visual art is not, nor has it ever been, primarily a form of knowledge communication; nor is it a servant of the knowledge acquisition enterprise."

(Stephen Scrivener, 2002)

Scrivener, Stephen (2002) "The art object does not embody a form of knowledge". Working Papers in Art & Design – Vol 2.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
15 APRIL 2014

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs at Tate Modern

Tate Modern: Exhibition, 17 April–7 September 2014

"Henri Matisse is a giant of modern art. This landmark show explores the final chapter in his career in which he began 'carving into colour' and his series of spectacular cut–outs was born. ...

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut–outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. ...

For the first time ever, we are broadcasting live into cinemas around the country with an exclusive film about the exhibition. Matisse Live offers an intimate, behind–the–scenes view of the artist via beautiful footage of the works, interviews with his friends plus rare archive footage of Matisse at work."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 FEBRUARY 2013

Constant Association for Art and Media: an interdisciplinary arts-lab

"Constant works in–between media and art and is interested in the culture and ethics of the World Wide Web. The artistic practice of Constant is inspired by the way that technological infrastructures, data–exchange and software determine our daily life. Free software, copyright alternatives and (cyber)feminism are important threads running through the activities of Constant.

Constant organizes workshops, print–parties, walks and 'Verbindingen/Jonctions'–meetings on a regular basis for a public that's into experiments, discussions and all kinds of exchanges."

(Constant)

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TAGS

1997artistic practice • arts-lab • Brussels • Constant (arts lab) • CRID • culture and ethics • cyberfeminismdaily life • data-exchange • experimental artistic practices • Francois Deville • Free Art License • Hasselt • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary creative practices • Internet art • jonctions • Liesbeth Huybrechts • media and art • media artnet art • non-profit association • print-parties • RenovaS • Severine Dusollier • SPIP • technological infrastructure • University of Namur • verbindingen • world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2012

Research Catalogue: international database for artistic research

"The Research Catalogue (RC) is a searchable database for archiving artistic research. RC content is not peer reviewed, nor is it highly controlled for quality, being checked only for appropriateness. As a result, the RC is highly inclusive.

The open source status of the RC is essential to its nature and serves its function as a connective and transitional layer between academic discourse and artistic practice, thereby constituting a discursive field for artistic research.

The RC creates a link between (1) elaborated documentation of the work; and (2) expositions and comments that engage with the contribution of the work as research.

Given that the RC is a site for artistic research, to add a work is to make a claim that the work can be seen as research; through expositions, comments and articles the initial claim is transformed into an argument. It is believed that the reflective space provided by the RC can become an essential part of the research process by providing a suitable structure in which to develop the relationship between documentation and exposition, whilst also retaining congruence with art itself.

Clearly, the RC is the backbone of JAR: potential JAR expositions emerge from the range of the artistic research activities taking place in it for peer–review and development within the RC space itself. Authors may nominate or JAR editors may select expositions for development as JAR contributions.

If you believe that RC software might also support your research database needs then explore the possibility of using the RC as your repository, by contacting us."

(Society of Artistic Research)

TAGS

academic discourse • ARC (acronym) • archiveartistic practiceartistic research • artistic research archive • Artistic Research Catalogue • artistic works as research • artistic works research • commentscreative practice researchcritical commentarydiscourse and practicediscursive field • discursive field for artistic research • documentation and exposition • elaborated documentation of the work • expositions • inclusive arts • information in context • intellectual argument • international database • international design discourseinterpretationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Research • journal management system • Karlsruhe University of Arts and Designknowledge commonsknowledge productionknowledge repositoryknowledge sharingnew voicespeer-reviewed • RC (acronym) • reflective space • research archiveresearch articlesResearch Catalogue (service)research collectionresearch databaseresearch processsearchable databasesharing and distributing knowledgesharing ideasSociety for Artistic Research (SAR) • the work as research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2012

Journal for Artistic Research: a focal point for diverse artistic voices

"Introducing a high–quality journal in the field allows an ever–increasing number of artistic researchers to partake in what for the sciences and humanities are standard academic publication procedures. Given that artistic research has become a worldwide movement with many local activities, JAR can serve as a focal point, bringing together diverse voices, facilitating the discourse and thus improving the artistic research community.

In the context of JAR, artistic research is doubly defined: insofar as it is research, it enhances knowledge and understanding; because it is artistic, however, the mode of presentation is essential. This definition excludes works of art that share modes of presentation with artistic research, but do not enhance understanding. It also excludes research that is not dependant on an artistic mode of presentation. Thus, the development of epistemological as well as artistic criteria for the exposure of artistic research is a key ambition of the Journal; part of JAR's mission is to re–negotiate art's relationship to academia and the role and function of research in artistic practice. Furthermore, JAR embraces research practices across disciplines, thereby emphasising the transdisciplinary character of much artistic research.

JAR's unique presentation of artistic research as 'weaves', instead of 'pages', facilitates multi–modal exposition, thereby meeting the desire of artistic researchers to have their work displayed and documented in a manner that demonstrates a respect for modes of presentation. By introducing, together with the RC, a standard for documentation, the Journal is responding to the international artistic and academic communities, which demand high quality referencing and documentation. Moreover, the Journal meets the need of art institutions such as museums, galleries and collections for artistic research to be more easily accessible."

(Michael Schwab)

Fig.1 Deborah Harty and Phil Sawdon (2010). "humhyphenhum: Still 5".

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TAGS

academic journalart and design researchart exhibitionart galleriesart museum • artistic mode of presentation • artistic practiceartistic research • artistic research community • artistic researchersarts institutionsarts practitionerarts researcharts researcherepistemological criteriafine art collections • high quality referencing • high-quality informationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Researchknowledge and understanding • modes of presentation • multi-modal exposition • Research Catalogue (service) • research practices • research requirementsSociety for Artistic Research (SAR)transdisciplinary research • weaving metaphor • weaving together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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