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Which clippings match 'Peter Greenaway' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 OCTOBER 2012

New Possibilities: Cinema is Dead, Long Live Cinema

"lectures presented by filmmaker Peter Greenaway as the 2010–2011 Avenali Chair in the Humanities at the Townsend Center for the Humanities.'"

(Townsend Center for the Humanities)

Fig1. Lecture presented by filmmaker Peter Greenaway 13 September 2010.

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TAGS

2010 • Avenali Chair in the Humanities • cinema • Cinema Is Dead Long Live Cinema • cinema pioneercommercial televisioncontinuous viewingdeath of cinemadeath of the authorfilmmakerfilmmakersindividual and collective activitiesJean-Luc Godardlecture • new possibilities • Peter Greenawayremote controltechnology innovationtelevision studiestemporal contiguity • Townsend Center for the Humanities • transformationzapper

CONTRIBUTOR

Alex Shutti
21 FEBRUARY 2012

Open Culture: a respository of cultural & educational media

"Open Culture brings together high–quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community. Web 2.0 has given us great amounts of intelligent audio and video. It's all free. It's all enriching. But it's also scattered across the web, and not easy to find. Our whole mission is to centralize this content, curate it, and give you access to this high quality content whenever and wherever you want it. Free audio books, free online courses, free movies, free language lessons, free ebooks and other enriching content – it's all here. Open Culture was founded in 2006."

(Dan Colman et al.)

Fig.1 Jim Henson's 1963 Robot Film Uncovered by AT&T.

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2006 • audio books • audio resources • cabinet of curiositiescollectioncontent • cultural media • digital resourceseBookebookseducational media • enriching content • Francis Baconfreefree resources • Jim Henson • knowledge commons • language lessons • lifelong learningonline lectures • online movies • online resources • open culture • Open Culture (resource)Peter Greenaway • quality content • resource • respository • The Republicvideo resources

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

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1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 SEPTEMBER 2008

Peter Greenaway: Projection on Last Supper

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film • Last Supper • Leonardo da VincipaintingPeter Greenawayprojection

CONTRIBUTOR

Shaun Belcher
01 JANUARY 2004

The Pillow Book: writing into the film space and multiple perspectives

Peter Greenaway's masterpiece The Pillow Book (1996) presents a multifaceted view of an event, splintering discrete actions into various views. There are numerous instances of this technique employed in this film, creating a sense that the viewer is being presented with but one of many possible views.

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