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Which clippings match '1996' keyword pg.1 of 5
16 FEBRUARY 2018

From cause to relation

"For the occidental tradition, the idea of God is intimately related to the idea of causality. That means that for any chain of facts it is reasonable to postulate an absolute beginning, which can be called 'God'. Nevertheless, if instead of explaining the universe through the principle of causality we decide to refer to the pure idea of a 'form' -as one can speak of 'rhetorical (or mathematical) forms'-, the chain ceases to be factual and becomes structural and iterative, like a grammar, and there is no longer any way to avoid the possibility of denying a 'real' beginning. The entities in the world become figures in a diagram, the ontological 'history' becomes a rhetorical 'texture' (trama), and God (written with upper initial) may always 'be moved' by some other 'god' (with lower initial), and so on, following a never ending texture 'of dust, and time, and dream and agonies'".

(Ivan Almeida, Cristina Parodi, 1996)

Almeida, I. and C. Parodi (1996). "Borges and the Ontology of Tropes." Variaciones Borges(2).

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TAGS

1996 • absolute beginning • bringing into relationcausality • chain of facts • Cristina Parodi • entities • explaining the universe • factuality • figures in a diagram • formgodhistory of ideasiterative • Ivan Almeida • Jorge Luis Borges • network model of relations • network morphology • occidental • ontological history • principle of causality • real beginning • relational model • relational view • rhetorical forms • rhetorical texture • structural logic • trama • Variaciones Borges

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 OCTOBER 2015

Computer-Mediated Communication

"While computer-mediated communication use and research are proliferating rapidly, findings offer contrasting images regarding the interpersonal character of this technology. Research trends over the history of these media are reviewed with observations across trends suggested so as to provide integrative principles with which to apply media to different circumstances. First, the notion that the media reduce personal influences—their impersonal effects—is reviewed. Newer theories and research are noted explaining normative 'interpersonal' uses of the media. From this vantage point, recognizing that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects. Additionally, recognizing that media sometimes facilitate communication that surpasses normal interpersonal levels, a new perspective on 'hyperpersonal' communication is introduced. Subprocesses are discussed pertaining to receivers, senders, channels, and feedback elements in computer-mediated communication that may enhance impressions and interpersonal relations."

(Joseph Walther, 1996)

Walther, J. (1996). "Computer-Mediated Communication: Impersonal, Interpersonal, and Hyperpersonal Interaction." Communication Research 23 February: 3-43.

TAGS

1996 • channel expansion theory • computer-mediated communication (CMC)computer-mediated interaction • cues-filtered-out • efficiency framework • electronic propinquity • electronic propinquity theory • experiential and perceptual CMC theories • face-to-face interaction • human behaviour in cyberspace • hyperpersonal model of CMC • interpersonal communication • interpersonal relations • Jochen Peter • Joseph Walther • Marjolijn Antheunis • media richness theory • mediated interactionnonverbal cues • Patti Valkenburg • propinquity • SIDE model • signaling theory • social identity model of deindividuation effects • social influence theory • social information processing (SIP) • social presence theory • teleconferencing research • videoconferencing • warranting • Yair Amichai-Hamburger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2015

SuperCollider: real-time audio synthesis and algorithmic composition

"The language interpreter runs in a cross platform IDE (OS X/Linux/Windows) and communicates via Open Sound Control with one or more synthesis servers. The SuperCollider synthesis server runs in a separate process or even on a separate machine so it is ideal for realtime networked music.

SuperCollider was developed by James McCartney and originally released in 1996. He released it under the terms of the GNU General Public License in 2002 when he joined the Apple Core Audio team. It is now maintained and developed by an active and enthusiastic community. It is used by musicians, scientists, and artists working with sound."

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1996 • acoustic research • algorithmic composition • algorithmic music • Apple Core Audio • authoring environmentcomputational designdevelopment environment • Devi Skanadze • electronic musicexperimental music • generative audio • generative musicGNU General Public LicenseIDE • interactive programming • James McCartney • language interpreter • LinuxOpen Sound ControlOSXprogramming environmentprogramming language • real-time audio synthesis • real-time generative music • real-time interaction • realtime networked music • rule-based worksonic arts • SuperCollider • synthesis server • Windows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

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TAGS

1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2013

Pulp International: retro popular culture and graphic novel illustration

"Yes, fifteen years ago it was. We were kids who didn't know squat about print publishing and now we're older and we don't know squat about web publishing. But we hope Pulp International manages to entertain. It's a bit different from our old Pulp, but it's similar in many ways too. We'll be looking for pulp everywhere – certainly in the usual places, like books and magazines, but also in music and art. For that matter, we'll also be looking for pulp events – that is, real–world crimes with a touch of deceit or corruption. And lastly, we'll be posting images from blaxploitation, sexploitation, noir, horror, sci–fi and psychedelia films, because these too seem like pulp. At least to us. So there you go. Nothing is permanent, and this site won't be either, but as long as it's fun, and you enjoy it, we'll be here."

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1950s1960s1970s1996advertising imagesadvertising posters • blaxploitation • book cover designcheesecakeconsumer culturedesign ephemeradetective storyfilm noirglamour shotgraphic novelmagazine artmagazine illustrationmaterial culturenewspaper adNSFW • Pierre-Laurent Brenot • pin-uppop-culture • popular illustration • poster art • psychedelia • psychedelic imagerypulp fiction • Pulp International (magazine) • retrosci-fisex sellssexploitationsexual innuendotitillationvintage advertisingvisual depictionvisual ephemera

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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