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02 FEBRUARY 2012

Videodance: Alba Casanova's mutant anatomy

Fig.1 VIDEODANZA PARTIDA, Categoría: Videocreación, Guión y Dirección: Alba Casanova, Edición: Alba Casanova y Marc Guardiola, VFX: Marc Guardiola, LInk: http://vimeo.com/23959917, Rodado con Canon 5D mk II, Sigma 24mm 1.8, Canon 50mm 1.4, Mención Especial del Premio Nacional en la categoría de Videoarte del Festival Valencia Crea 2011. Via Bartholomew Bazaz, "Forest For Thoughts– My Journal and Diary" [http://bartholabazaz.tumblr.com/post/16882591206]

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TAGS

2011 • Alba Casanova • anatomybizarrebodycreative practicedancefiguresfreaksgrotesque • Marc Guardiola • morphingmutantnudephysiologyVFXvideo creation • videodance • visual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

Victoria and Albert Museum: A History of Computer Art

"One of the most famous works to come out of Bell Labs was Leon Harmon and Ken Knowlton's Studies in Perception, 1967, also known as Nude.

Harmon and Knowlton decided to cover the entire wall of a senior colleague's office with a large print, the image of which was made up of small electronic symbols that replaced the grey scale in a scanned photograph. Only by stepping back from the image (which was 12 feet wide), did the symbols merge to form the figure of a reclining nude. Although the image was hastily removed after their colleague returned, and even more hastily dismissed by the institution's PR department, it was leaked into the public realm, first by appearing at a press conference in the loft of Robert Rauschenberg, and later emblazoned across the New York Times. What had started life as a work–place prank became an overnight sensation."

Fig.1 Leon Harmon and Ken Knowlton, 'Studies in Perception', 1997 (original image 1967). Museum no. E.963–2008. Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Patric Prince.

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TAGS

1967ASCIIASCII-Art • Bell Laboratories • Bell Labscomputer history • electronic symbols • Kenneth Knowlton • large print • Leon Harmon • New York Timesnude • overnight sensation • reclining nudeRobert Rauschenberg • Studies in Perception (1967) • wall • work-place prank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JANUARY 2009

Conflicted Selves: Women, Art, & Paris 1880-1914

"By the mid–nineteenth century, the academic tradition of the Paris Salon was under attack by artists who wanted to break with the image of an ideal female body, and replace it with a reflection of the nude as it might be seen in the contemporary, modern world. The realist artist Edouard Manet shocked the Salon public with Olympia in 1863, a portrait that completely disregarded the formalist tradition of painting the nude, and depicted a low–class prostitute sprawled out on an unmade bed. Contemporaries labelled Manet's technique rough and crude, his brushstrokes hurried and inconsistent, and his use of colour alarming.[8] Olympia's skin, in particular, caused outrage. Unlike the polished finish of classical nudes, Manet had used tones of yellow and grey, which made her skin look sallow, and had outlined her figure in a rough, dark line, which gave her a flat and two–dimensional appearance. Art critics noted that Olympia had 'dirty hands and wrinkled feet;' 'her face is stupid, her skin cadaverous [...] she does not have a human form.'[9] They also criticized Manet's break with the traditional rules of the gaze. Unlike Venus's seductive, yet demure and mysterious half–glance, Olympia stared brazenly out from the canvas. Her forceful gaze communicated confidence, defiance, and self–possession, which was disarming when paired with her nakedness. The subject matter was also roundly criticized. Manet had painted a common prostitute, not a genteel courtesan, and had made no attempt to conceal this fact. As T. J. Clark has noted, her placement in a comfortably bourgeois setting added to the shocking effect of the painting, and in the figure of Olympia, Manet had successfully bared the social taboos of prostitution, illicit sex and disease, all of which were growing concerns during the second half of the nineteenth century. With this image, Manet had created what he felt was a realistic, honest, depiction of the female body, one that was stripped of the artistic traditions of form and technique, and connected to some of the disconcerting elements of modern life."
(Julie Anne Johnson, 2008)

[Edouard Manet''s Olympia works as a parody of Titian' 'The Venus of Urbino'.]

8. T. J Clark, The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Age of Manet and his Followers, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1984, 134.

9. Charles Bernheimer, 'Manet's Olympia: The Figuration of Scandal,' Poetics Today, Volume 10, Issue 2, Art & Literature II (Summer 1989): 255–277, 256.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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