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Which clippings match 'Sexual Politics' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 MARCH 2013

Dorothy Iannone's Innocent and Aware

Dorothy Iannone, "Innocent and Aware", 8 March 2013 – 5 May 2013, Camden Arts Centre in London.

"Iannone's portrayals of male and female sexuality celebrate the joy of her most intimate relationships while subverting traditional gender stereotypes of dominance and control. Through graphic paintings, sculptures and video boxes her works depict partly–clothed and naked figures on bright psychedelic backgrounds of flora, mandalas and biomorphic patterns. Recalling classical Indian erotic art, Egyptian frescoes and Byzantine mosaics, Iannone's intricate work communicates a personal narrative, passionate love affairs and lifetime pursuit of 'ecstatic unity' through transcendence and spirituality."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2013)

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TAGS

201320th century artartistbiomorphic • biomorphic patterns • ByzantineCamden Arts Centrecontroldominance • Dorothy Iannone • ecstasy • ecstatic unity • erotic artexhibitionexplicit sexual imageryfemale artistfemale sexuality • fresco • gender representationgender stereotypesgenitals • graphic paintings • innocenceintimacyintimate sexuality • love affair • lovemaking • mandala • mosaicnaive stylenaively drawn figuresnaked figuresNorth American artistpenispersonal narrativephysical lovepsychedelicpsychedelic imageryself-taughtsex • sexual liberation • sexual politicssexualityshock artspectacle • spiritual awareness • spiritualitytranscendence • unconditional love • vagina • video box • vulvawomen artistswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

Do Look Now: A playful meditation on sexual pleasures

"From academic and cinephile Helen Yeates comes this 16–minute mash–up of sexual and erotic scenes that creatively pushed the sensual boundaries of cinema, challenging audiences over the last four decades.

An ironic intercutting of arousing and transgressive scenes, Do Look Now creates a provocative interplay of love, sex, desire, humour, nostalgic yearning and cultural memory.

Part postmodern pastiche, part cut–up passion project, Yeates's creation explores the contours of female eroticism and sexual politics, playing with the way context can lend fresh meaning and nuance to sexual depictions."

(Brisbane International Film Festival, 2012)

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TAGS

2012arousalBrisbane • Brisbane International Film Festival • challenging audiences • cineaste • cinema • cinephile • cinephilic understandingcontextcultural memorycut-up techniquedesire • Do Look Now (film) • erotic sceneseroticism • female eroticism • female sexuality • Helen Yeates • humour • intercut • intercutting • ironiclovemash-upnostalgic yearningpostmodern assemblagepostmodern pastiche • provocative interplay • sensualitysexualsexual depictions • sexual pleasure • sexual politicssexualitytransgression • transgressive scenes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2009

Judy Chicago's Dinner Party

"In 1974, Chicago turned her attention to the subject of women''s history to create her most well–known work, The Dinner Party, which was executed between 1974 and 1979 with the participation of hundreds of volunteers. This monumental multimedia project, a symbolic history of women in Western Civilization, has been seen by more than one million viewers during its sixteen exhibitions held at venues spanning six countries.

The Dinner Party has been the subject of countless articles and art history texts and is included in innumerable publications in diverse fields. The impact of The Dinner Party was examined in the 1996 exhibition, Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago''s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History. Curated by Dr. Amelia Jones at the UCLA Armand Hammer Museum, this show was accompanied by an extensive catalog published by the University of California Press."
(Judy Chicago)

[Film extract taken from ''Right Out of History: The Making of Judy Chicago''s Dinner Party'', 1980]

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TAGS

197420th century artdinnerdinner tablefeminist artgenderhistoryinstallation • Judy Chicago • sexual politics • symbolic history of women • symbolism • The Dinner Party • women artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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