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Which clippings match '1974' keyword pg.1 of 4
07 AUGUST 2016

1974 documentary about Aotearoa New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere

"Directed by Sam Pillsbury, this 1974 film observes Ralph Hotere — one of New Zealand's greatest artists — at a moment when excitement is gathering about his work. Lauded as a 'classic' by Ian Wedde, the documentary is framed around the execution of a watershed piece: a large mural Hotere was commissioned to paint for Hamilton's Founders Theatre. Interviews with friends and associates — poets Hone Tuwhare and Bill Manhire, art critics, officials and dealers — are intercut with fascinating shots of Hotere working (including making art by photocopying or 'xerography')."

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197420th century artabstract artists • Ad Reinhardt • Aotearoa New Zealandart critics • art dealer • art documentary • art historian • artist • Barry Lett • Bill Manhire • Brian Shennan • David Fowler • Dunedinfine art • Founders Theatre • geometric abstraction • Gordon Brown (art historian) • Hamilton • Hone Tuwhare • Ian Wedde • Jack Body • John Scott • Land Wars • Landfall (literary journal) • Lynton Diggle • MaorimuralNew Zealand artistNew Zealand on ScreenNZ Film ArchiveNZ On Screenpainting • photocopying • Port ChalmersRalph Hotere • Rodney Kirk-Smith • Roger Collins • Sam Pillsbury • spray painting • Te Aupouri • Te Rarawa • visual artist • xerography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

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TAGS

19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2014

Eduardo Paolozzi: Turkische Musik, 1974

"Eduardo Paolozzi's work often, as in the Türkische Musik series, may be printed in different color schemes or on different papers. All these elements combine to suggest that the image is often discovered in the act of creating it; the artist's role is integrally balanced between active calculation and chance. No longer confined to a single plan, the artist–printmaker and his work signify an exciting new order of print– making, one in which technological expertise becomes a useful vehicle for personal expression."

(Georgette Lee, 1986)

Precision of Image: Technology in Printed Art : 20 April – 7 September, 1986, The Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery at Syracuse University in Syracuse.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

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1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2014

Interface functions: conceptually similar operationally different

"I am going to argue that 'media independence' does not just happen by itself. For a technique to work with various data types, programmers have to implement a different method for each data type. Thus, media–independent techniques are general concepts translated into algorithms, which can operate on particular data types. Let us look at some examples.

Consider the omnipresent cut and paste. The algorithm to select a word in a text document is different from the algorithm to select a curve in a vector drawing, or the algorithm to select a part of a continuous tone (i.e. raster) image. In other words, 'cut and paste' is a general concept that is implemented differently in different media software depending on which data type this software is designed to handle. (In Larry Tesler's original implementation of the universal commands concept done at PARC in 1974–5, it only worked for text editing.) Although cut, copy, paste, and a number of similar 'universal commands' are available in all contemporary GUI applications for desktop computers (but not necessarily in mobile phone apps), what they actually do and how they do it is different from application to application.

Search operates in the same way. The algorithm to search for a particular phrase in a text document is different than the algorithm that searches for a particular face in a photo or a video clip. (I am talking here about 'content–based search,' i.e. the type of search which looks for information inside actual images, as opposed to only searching image titles and other metadata the way image search engines such as Google Image Search were doing it in the 2000s.) However, despite these differences the general concept of search is the same: locating any elements of a single media object–or any media objects in a larger set–to match particular user–defined criteria. Thus we can ask the web browser to locate all instances of a particular word in a current web page; we can ask a web search engine to locate all web pages which contain a set of keywords; and we can ask a content–based image search engine to find all images that are similar in composition to an image we provided. ...

Against these historical developments, the innovation of media software clearly stands. They bring a new set of techniques which are implemented to work across all media. Searchability, findability, linkability, multimedia messaging and sharing, editing, view control, zoom and other 'mediaindependent' techniques are viruses that infect everything software touches–and therefore in their importance they can be compared to the basic organizing principles for media and artifacts which were used for thousands of years."

(Lev Manovich, 2013, pp.113–124)

Manovich, L. (2013). "Software Takes Command", Continuum.

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TAGS

1974algorithm • black box model • black box system • black box theory • content-based • content-based search • continuous tone • cut and pastedata typesdesktop computer • findability • general concepts • Google Image Search • GUI applications • high-level designimage identificationimage searchimage search engine • implemented differently • keyword search • Larry Tesler • Lev Manovich • linkability • low-level implementation • media independence • media production • media software • media-independent techniques • media-independent techniques from different implementations • metadata • polymorphism • raster imagesearch algorithmsearch engine • search phrase • search toolsearchabilitytechnology affordances • text document • text editing • text selection • TinEye • universal commands • vector graphicvisual searchweb search engineweb searchingXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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