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Which clippings match 'Norway' keyword pg.1 of 3
31 OCTOBER 2013

Squidsoup's Living Timeline at Amsterdam's Cinekid Festival

"We are delighted to be part of this year's Cinekid Festival (see http://www.cinekid.nl/ for more info) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In among a host of awesome content and highly engaging interactive kid-oriented experiences, we have installed our Living Timeline project. It feels great to give the piece its first international audience, and to be in this cool exhibition."

(Squidsoup)

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TAGS

2013Amsterdam • Anthony Rowe • Aotearoa New Zealandchildrens media • Chris Bennewith • Cinekid Festival (Amsterdam) • digital engagement • digital media experiences • emotive headspaces • experience designexploratory learning experienceexplore and interact • Gaz Bushell • immersive environmentsimmersive experienceinteraction designinteractive environmentsinteractive exhibitinteractive experience • interactive media experiences • interactive projectioninteractive virtual worldskid-oriented experiences • Liam Birtles • Living Timeline (project) • Norway • Squidsoup (collective) • tactile interactivetimelineUKvideo trackingvirtual worldsvisual representations of scientific concepts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Norsk Folkemuseum living history museum in Norway

"The Norsk Folkemuseum is Norway's largest museum of cultural history. With collections from around the country, the museum shows how people lived in Norway from 1500 to the present.

The more than 150 buildings in the Open-Air Museum represent different regions in Norway, different time periods, as well as differences between town and country, and social classes. The Gol Stave Church dating from 1200 is one of five medieval buildings at the museum. The contemporary history is presented through exhibitions and documentation projects focusing especially on children, youth and the multicultural population. Permanent indoor exhibitions include folk art, folk costumes, toys and Sami culture."

(Astrid Santa, Norsk Folkemuseum)

[Actors are located in some of the buildings to provide visitors with a sense of the life of the original inhabitants.]

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TAGS

1200 • 1500 • anthropologybuilding • contemporary history • costumecultural heritagecultural historyeverydayfolkfolk art • folk costumes • folk museum • Gol Stave Church • heritagehistorical reenactment • household • indoor exhibitions • living farm museum • living history museumliving museummedieval • medieval buildings • middle ages • multicultural population • museummuseum of cultural historyNordic • Norsk Folkemuseum • Norway • Norwegian Museum of Cultural History • open-air • open-air museumOslooutdoor • period costume • period lifereenactment • Sami culture • ScandinaviasettlementSimon Perkins

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JUNE 2010

No character can exist without the context of a game world

"The role of the character in a role-playing game has long been debated. Yet no character can exist without the context of a game world. The character always has a relationship to its surroundings; the easiest way of creating a character is often through providing a context. Even if one supposedly plays oneself in a fictional world, a character - a variation on the ordinary persona - will soon emerge. "

(Markus Montola & Jaakko Stenros)

[2] Montola, M. and J. S. (eds) (2008). Playground Worlds - Creating and Evaluating Experiences of Role-Playing Games. Finland, Ropecon ry.

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TAGS

2008 • A Week in Finland • belongingcharactercollaborationcontextconventioncultural codesDenmarkengagementfictional worldFinlandgamegame world • Knudepunkt • Knutepunkt • Knutpunkt • LARPlive-action • live-action role-playing • NordicNorwayparticipationpersonaplayrole playingsocial interaction • Solmukohta • story worldstoryworldsurroundingsSwedenworld of the storyworld-building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 FEBRUARY 2010

Wikileaks: airing governments' and corporations' dirty laundry

"Wikileaks, with its simple 'keep the bastards honest' ethos, aims to discourage unethical behaviour by airing governments' and corporations' dirty laundry in public, putting their secrets out there in the public realm. The site won Index on Censorship's 2008 freedom of expression award because it's an invaluable resource for anonymous whistleblowers and investigative journalists.

Among Wikileaks' recent triumphs are its publication of top-secret internet censorship lists. The blacklists from Australia, Thailand, Denmark and Norway demonstrate exactly how censorship systems are abused to suppress free expression. The Thai list featured sites criticising the country's royal family and the Australian blacklist turned out to include a school canteen consultancy. Despite its child porn mandate, less than half of the Australian blacklist were linked to paedophilia. Also on the list were satanic and fetish sites, anti-abortion websites, and sites belonging to a kennel operator and a dentist. Publication highlighted the lack of transparency in the process and gave impetus to the 'No Clean Feed' campaign which opposes the Australian government's internet filter proposals."

(Emily Butselaar, guardian.co.uk)

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abuseanonymous • anti-abortion • Australia • blacklist • censorshipchild pornographycollaboration • comment is free • critiquedemocratic participationDenmarkdigital mediaemancipationempowermentethicsfree expressionfreedom of expression • freedom of information • Internet • internet filter • investigative journalism • Julian Assange • keep the bastards honest • media • No Clean Feed • Norwaypaedophiliapowerprotestresponsibilityroyal family • satanic • secretsexual fetishsocietytechnologyThailand • top-secret • transparencywhistleblowerWikileaks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2009

Expanding the narrow definitions of documentary animation

"The term 'animated documentary' can still upset a truth-seeking purist. But over the last few years our understanding of what a documentary is has expanded from the narrow direct cinema/cinema vérité definition of the 1970s and the 1980s. A more inclusive definition with room for both classic documentaries like the European city symphonies of the 1920s and the personal film essays of the 1990s and the 2000s is now gaining support.

There was a close connection between animation and documentary filmmaking in Europe in the 1920s (Walter Ruttman, Hans Richter, Dziga Vertov) and in the UK in the 1930s (John Grierson, Len Lye, Norman McLaren). This close connection continued at the National Film Board of Canada after World War II and through to this day. Even Hollywood’s Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences accepted the animated documentary as documentary proper by giving the Oscar to McLaren (Neighbours, 1952) and Saul Bass (Why Man Creates, 1968). The direct cinema/cinema vérité movements and the total dominance of TV documentaries closely based on journalism have dominated the documentary tradition since the 1960s. But postmodernist thinking combined with more individual/personal artistic filmmaking have brought the artistic elements of the European documentaries of the 1920s and 1930s back. And this scene has also opened up for the modern animated documentary.

At the NFB the filmmakers never stopped making animated documentaries, and a similar tradition has been kept alive in the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Sweden and Norway. I believe a major reason for this is the social democratic political thinking that lies behind both the ideology of the NFB and the film politics in Scandinavia. The film industry deserves state funding because the films play a vital role in our democracy."

(Gunnar Strøm, March 2005, 'How Swede It Is ...and Danish and Norwegian: Scandinavian documentary animation', p.13, fpsmagazine.com)

Fig.1 Monika Forsberg & Susie Sparrow 2006, We Believe in Happy Endings

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TAGS

2005 • animated documentary • animationappropriationarts fundingCanadacinema veriteDenmarkdirect cinemadocumentary • documentary animation • Dziga Vertovfilm industryHans RichterJohn GriersonjournalismLen LyeNational Film Board of CanadaNeighbours • NFB • Norman McLarenNorwaypostmodernismSaul BassScandinaviasocial democratic • state funding • Swedenvisual communicationvisualisationWalter Ruttmann

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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