Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Poison' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 JANUARY 2014

Striking animated music video for BULGARI's Curare (2007)

Music video for Bulgarian musician/producer/DJ. Bogdan Irkük a.k.a. BULGARI's (Богдан Иркук а.к.а. БУЛГАРИ) 2007 song "Curare". Credits: directed by Måns Swanberg (a.k.a. Pistachios), illustrations by Tomas Nilsson, character modelling and rigging by Jonas Thörnqvist, recording label: Rollerboys Recordings.

1
2

TAGS

20072D animation3D animationanimated music videoback storyBMW • Bogdan Irkuk (BULGARI) • Bulgarian • car crashcard game • Curare (2007) • drivingflashback • Jonas Thornqvist • Mans Swanberg • monotonemusic video • Pistachios Studio (Sweden) • poison • poison dart • Rollerboys Recordings • Tomas Nilsson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

1

TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2011

The Story of Stuff: The Story of Electronics

"So, some time ago I was shown this video 'The Story of Stuff', a project created by Annie Leonard. She is an environmentalist who worked on international environmental health and sustainability issues, among other things like Greenpeace International, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and others.

This project has, so far, 2 seasons, the first with 7 short animated videos explaining some of our everyday environmental, social and economic problems and how they're related to one another. The second season is more focused on what is behind these social, environmental and economical problems and how we can act on them."

(Letícia Neves, 23 March 2011)

Fig.1 Annie Leonard (9 November 2010). 'The Story of Electronics'

1

TAGS

2010activismanimated explainer videoanimated presentation • Annie Leonard • commoditycritiquedesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-wasteecological • economic issues • electronicselectronics industry • Electronics TakeBack Coalition • environmental issuesenvironmentalistethicseverydayexploitationgadget • GAIA • Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives • green design • green race to the top • Greenpeace • Greenpeace International • high-tech revolution • innovationinternational environmental health and sustainability issueslong-lasting products • manufacturing industry • miningobsolescencePeoples Republic of Chinapoison • poisoned workers • recyclable • recyclingresponsibility • responsible recycling • social changesocial issues • Story of Electronics • Story of Stuff • sustainability • toxic-free products • toxicological effectswaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 APRIL 2011

Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl

"On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at Chernobyl nuclear power station explodes, sending an enormous radioactive cloud over Northern Ukraine and neighbouring Belarus. The danger is kept a secret from the rest of the world and the nearby population who go about their business as usual. May Day celebrations begin, children play and the residents of Pripyat marvel at the spectacular fire raging at the reactor. After three days, an area the size of England becomes contaminated with radioactive dust, creating a 'zone' of poisoned land.

Produced by Seventh Art Productions and based on Mario Petrucci's award–winning book–length poem, Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl tells the story of the people who dealt with the disaster at ground–level: the fire–fighters, the soldiers, the 'liquidators', and their families."

(Seventh Art Productions)

'Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl' (2007). Directed by David Bickerstaff and Phil Grabsky, Poetry by Mario Petrucci, 52 minutes

1

TAGS

1986 • 25th anniversary • BelarusChernobylconsequencescontaminationdisasterdocumentaryenvironment • explosion • familyfilmfilm essayfirefirefighter • heavy water • Heavy Water (film) • legacy • liquidator • Mario Petrucci • May Day celebrations • mortalitynuclear disasternuclear power stationnuclear reactorpersonal storypoempoisonPripyatradiationradioactiveradioactive contaminationradioactive dustsecret • Seventh Art Productions • soldierUkrainezone

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2008

Planned obsolescence causing ecological catastrophe

"This is a story about recycling – about how your best intentions to be green can be channelled into an underground sewer that flows from the United States [to Guiyu in Southern China].
...
At a recycling event in Denver, 60 Minutes found cars bumper–to–bumper for blocks, in a line that lasted for hours. They were there to drop off their computers, PDAs, TVs and other electronic waste.

Asked what he thought happens once his e–waste goes into recycling, one man told [60 Minutes correspondent Scott] Pelley, "Well my assumption is they break it apart and take all the heavy metals and out and then try to recycle some of the stuff that's bad."

Most folks in line were hoping to do the right thing, expecting that their waste would be recycled in state–of–the–art facilities that exist here in America. But really, there's no way for them to know where all of this is going. The recycling industry is exploding and, as it turns out, some so–called recyclers are shipping the waste overseas, where it's broken down for the precious metals inside.
...
Greenpeace has been filming around Guiyu and caught the recycling work. Women were heating circuit boards over a coal fire, pulling out chips and pouring off the lead solder. Men were using what is literally a medieval acid recipe to extract gold. Pollution has ruined the town. Drinking water is trucked in. Scientists have studied the area and discovered that Guiyu has the highest levels of cancer–causing dioxins in the world. They found pregnancies are six times more likely to end in miscarriage, and that seven out of ten kids have too much lead in their blood."
(60 Minutes, CBS, 9 November 2008)

[This activity is apparently not only restricted to the USA. According Elizabeth Grossman toxic material is also being sent from Europe and Japan.]

1
2

3

TAGS

2008 • BAN (acronym) • Basel Action Network • consumptionDenverdesign responsibilitye-wasteecologicalethicsexploitationgreenGreenpeace • Guiyu • harmful chemicals • Natural Resources Defense Council • obsolescencePeoples Republic of Chinapoisonpovertyprecious metalsrare earthsrecycled garbagerecyclingrubbishsustainabilitytoxic materialstoxic substancestoxicological effectsUSAwaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.