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14 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Public Domain Review: publicly available out-of-copyright works

"The Public Domain Review is a not–for–profit project dedicated to showcasing the most interesting and unusual out–of–copyright works available online.

All works eventually fall out of copyright–from classic works of art, music and literature, to abandoned drafts, tentative plans, and overlooked fragments. In doing so they enter the public domain, a vast commons of material that everyone is free to enjoy, share and build upon without restriction.

(Adam Green and Jonathan Gray)

Fig.1 [http://publicdomainreview.org/2011/08/15/labillardiere–and–his–relation/], Fig.2 [http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/07/30/the–flowers–personified–1847/]

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Adam Green • Biodiversity Heritage Library • Boston Public Library • British Library • California Digital Library • copyright • copyright free • copyrighted materialCornell University Library • Deutsche Fotothek • Europeana • Flickr: The Commons • Geographicus Rare and Antique Maps • Internet Archive • Jonathan Gray • Library of CongressliteratureLos Angeles County Museum of Art • Medical Heritage Library • National Archives (UK) • National Gallery of Denmark • National Library of Poland • National Library of the Netherlands • National Media Museum • New York Public Library • open content • Open Images • Open Knowledge Foundation • OpenGLAM • out-of-copyright • Prelinger Archives • Princeton Theological Seminary Library • public domain • Public Domain Review • Rijksmuseum • share and build upon • Smithsonian InstituteSmithsonian Libraries • SMU Central University Libraries • The Getty • The Royal Society (UK) • United States Naval Observatory • University of Houston Digital Libraries • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • University of Toronto Libraries • US National Library of Medicine • Villanova Digital Library • Walters Art Museum • Wikimedia Commons • works of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2013

Will Burtin: pioneer information designer

"Will Burtin, was one of the foremost information designers of the 20th century. Will Burtin was born in Germany and trained as a typographer and designer at the Werkschule Cologne, Germany, where he also later taught. Shortly after emigrating to the United States in 1938, he was commissioned to create exhibition units for the Federal Pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. From 1943 to 1945, Burtin worked for the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1945, Burtin became art director for Fortune magazine. Later, in 1949, Burtin established his own design firm in New York with clients including Union Carbide, Eastman Kodak, the Smithsonian Institution, and Upjohn Pharmaceuticals. In 1971, Burtin received a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Graphic Arts."

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20th centuryAmerican Institute of Graphic ArtsColognecommunication design • communication designer • design firm • Eastman Kodak • Federal Pavilion at the • Fortune magazinegraphic designgraphic designerinfluential designerinformation designinformation designerinformation graphics • Kolner Werkschulen • layered • New York Worlds Fair 1939 • Print (magazine) • RIT Graphic Design ArchiveRochester Institute of Technology • Scope (magazine) • Smithsonian Institutetypographer • Union Carbide • Upjohn Pharmaceuticals • US Army Air Corps • visual communicationWill Burtin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2011

Tunnel box miniature theatre of garden scene with dancers

"Title devised by cataloger. The set includes six hand–colored etched prints on light gray laid paper, with sections carefully cut out to create a perspective view when the prints are arranged in a viewing box. The prints are numbered 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, and 378. The set number (56) appears on print no. 378; the prints are otherwise without text.

Attributed to the engraver and print–seller Martin Engelbrecht of Augsburg, Germany. Artists Jeremias Wachsmuth or David Nessenthaler may have collaborated on the illustrations."

(Smithsonian Institution)

Fig. 1 Martin Engelbrecht [Garden scene with dancers, to be used as the set for a miniature theatre]

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2D3D space • amusements • Augsburg • dancers • David Nessenthaler • diorama • engraver • etchingfigures in spaceframe • garden scene • Germany • hand-coloured • illustrationin a box • Jeremias Wachsmuth • layer • Martin Engelbrecht • miniature • miniature theatre • optical toypaper dioramapapercraftperspectiveperspective viewproscenium archSmithsonian Institutespace-frametatebankotheatre • theatrical set • tunnel booktunnel box • viewing box • visual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Scientific illustrations depict scientifically important features

"As a scientific illustrator, one must be able to convey a detailed, clear and accurate depiction of a specimen. Scientific illustrations are an important part of the documentation that makes a specimen museum–quality – along with field and research notes, accession records, photographs, and correspondence about the specimen. A scientific illustration captures information about a plant or animal, information that is often missing from the museum specimen. Scientific illustrations depict the scientifically important features of the organism being studied. They often also describe that organism's natural environment."

(National Museum of American History)

Fig.1 George Venable (1992). Drawing of a Carabid beetle from South America, created for the research of Dr. Terry L. Erwin of the Department of Entomology, courtesy of the Entomology Illustration Archive, NMNH

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accession records • accuracy • animal information • biomedical illustrationdetailed drawingdocumentationentomology • Entomology Illustration Archive • fidelity • field notes • George Venable • illustrationillustration to visually communicate informationinterpretation • museum specimen • National Museum of American Historynatural environmentorganismplant information • research notes • sciencescientific illustrationscientific illustratorscientific visualisation • scientifically important features • scientistsSmithsonian Institutespecimenvisual depictionvisual fidelityvisual representationvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 DECEMBER 2008

The Smithsonian Institute''s experimental object repository

"The Smithsonian Institute's 'HistoryWired: A few of our favorite things' is an experimental programme through which you can take a virtual tour of selected objects from the vast collections of the National Museum of American History. The 450 items are clustered into groups such as home, clothing, business, computers,... and linked to attributes such as politics, medicine, and science. Users can click to get more details, search by attributes or filter by time period. This novel web site invites users to record their level of interest for items, which grow in size as they get higher scores."

(Shiralee Saul, 2002)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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