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26 MAY 2014

Michel Foucault's Biopolitics

"we can call 'biopolitics' the specific strategies and contestations over problematizations of collective human vitality, morbidity and mortality. Over the forms of knowledge, regimes of authority, and practices of intervention that are desirable, legitimate and efficacious."

(Paul Rabinow and Nikolas Rose, 12 October 2003)

TAGS

2003biopolitical power relationsbiopolitics • biopower • bipolar technology • birthbody • collective existence • conceptual clarification • genomic medicine • longevity • mechanisms of life • Michel Foucault • modes of subjectification • morbidity • mortality • political struggle • populationrace • regulatory controls • reproductionsexualitysociology • strategies for the governing of life • technologies of power • the character of living human beings • truth discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2010

Critical Pedagogy

"'Critical pedagogy considers how education can provide individuals with the tools to better themselves and strengthen democracy, to create a more egalitarian and just society, and thus to deploy education in a process of progressive social change. Media literacy involves teaching the skills that will empower citizens and students to become sensitive to the politics of representations of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and other cultural differences in order to foster critical thinking and enhance democratization. Critical media literacy aims to make viewers and readers more critical and discriminating readers and producers of texts.

'Critical media pedagogy provides students and citizens with the tools to analyze critically how texts are constructed and in turn construct and position viewers and readers. It provides tools so that individuals can dissect the instruments of cultural domination, transform themselves from objects to subjects, from passive to active. Thus critical media literacy is empowering, enabling students to become critical producers of meanings and texts, able to resist manipulation and domination.'"

(Douglas Kellner)

Douglas Kellner, "Multiple Literacies and Critical Pedagogies" in Revolutionary Pedagogies – Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory, Peter Pericles Trifonas, Editor, Routledge, 2000

TAGS

analyse critically • critical media literacy • critical pedagogy • critical producers • critical thinkingcritiquecultural difference • cultural domination • democracydemocratisationdialogic • discriminating readers • dominationeducationegalitarianemancipationempowermentengagementethnicitygender • just society • manipulationmedia literacypedagogypoliticspower • progressive social change • racerepresentationsexualitysocial classsocial constructionismsocietyteachingtransformation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2009

Foundations of European Imperialism?

"In order to understand and expose the underlying global social hierarchy today, it's imperative for researchers to trace back its historical roots. Obviously this is an overwhelmingly daunting task to say the least, for the problem of racism is almost as old as Humanity itself. Therefore, we must at least try to trace it back to a more immediate past in order to comprehend the racist quagmire encompassing the world today. Now we can attest to the fact that Historical Global European Imperialism / Expansionism / Colonialism has had the most impact on reshaping the world in the last several centuries. Clearly, it has had the most influence, by far, in the world of politics, economics, education, commercialism, you name it. Furthermore without European Imperialism, "America" as you currently know it would not exist. In addition to that, had it not been for European Imperialism, White institutional control would not be so globally pervasive."
(changabula, Chinadaily BBS)

[A sensationalist (and somewhat anti–North American) but interesting perspective on the representation of East Asian people in popular media.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 DECEMBER 2008

New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853

"New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853, when the Imperial Parliament's New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was implemented. Until that time, New Zealand was a Crown colony. The power vested in the Crown by the various Acts of Parliament relating to New Zealand was in turn vested in the governor. The colonial secretary issued him with instructions as to how this authority was to be exercised. In a colony with only one governor, none of the executive powers were delegated. He could take advice from subordinates but nothing could be done without his authority. In theory once lieutenant–governors were appointed, as in New Zealand after 1846, they would conduct the administration of their provinces, and certain executive powers would be delegated to them under the supervision of the governor–in–chief.

New Zealand was initially under the adminstration of the New South Wales governor, Sir George Gipps. On 3 May 1841 the country became a Crown colony in its own right and Hobson was elevated from lieutenant–governor to governor. Hobson died on 10 September 1842 after a series of illnesses which left many of his duties to his few officials. His replacement was Captain Robert FitzRoy, governor from 26 December 1843 until 17 November 1845. It was during his term of office that the Otakou purchase was negotiated. The Hobson and FitzRoy administrations were periods of considerable economic and political difficulty. Government was severely under–resourced and under–funded. Tensions between Maori and settlers, and between both races and the Crown remained unresolved. With the appointment of Captain George Grey, backed by Imperial troops and much stronger financial support, the Crown was able to take the initiative."

(The Ngāi Tahu Report 1991, Section 5.2.1, Waitangi Tribunal, Department of Justice, Wellington)

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TAGS

1853 • Aotearoa New ZealandAustraliaCommonwealthconstitution • Crown colony • George Gipps • George Grey • governor • IndigenousMaoriNew South Wales • Ngāi Tahu • NSWOtago • Otakou • race • Robert FitzRoy • settlementSouth IslandTe Tiriti o WaitangitreatyTreaty of WaitangitribevaluesWilliam Hobson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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