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Which clippings match 'Constitution' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 APRIL 2010

Flagging interest in Nation Branding and National Identity?

"We are a changing, emerging state that no longer seeks inspiration from the present flag. It is part of our history and the role that it has played can be respected. We are moving from a predominantly bicultural society to one that now involves an important component of Pacific island people and also immigrants from Asia.

We must now seek inspiration, visual excitement and stimulus to creativity and excellence from many directions and develop a flag that can be a source of pride to New Zealanders as we continue to impact strongly on the wider world in the many areas of commerce, sport, films, literature, tourism and creative thinking in which we have to strive to excel."

(Ian Prior, 27 February 2004)

Fig.1 New Zealand National flag and state ensign; Fig.2 Michael Smythe, 'Koru (after Gordon Walters)'; Fig.3 Cameron Sanders; Fig.4 'Tino Rangatiratanga'; Fig.5 Kyle Lockwood.

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TAGS

2004Aotearoa New ZealandAsia-Pacificautonomy • biculturalism • brand development • brand recognitionBritish Empirechange of imageCommonwealthconstitution • creation of a brand • defaced Blue Ensign • distinguishing featuresflag • Gordon Walters • historyidentityindependenceIndigenous • koru • Koru Flag • Maori • Michael Smythe • motifnation brandingnational identity • NZFlag.com Trust • PacificPakehaplace brandingpostcolonial • Southern Cross • sovereigntysymbol • Tino Rangatiratanga • vexillologyvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 DECEMBER 2008

New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853

"New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853, when the Imperial Parliament's New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was implemented. Until that time, New Zealand was a Crown colony. The power vested in the Crown by the various Acts of Parliament relating to New Zealand was in turn vested in the governor. The colonial secretary issued him with instructions as to how this authority was to be exercised. In a colony with only one governor, none of the executive powers were delegated. He could take advice from subordinates but nothing could be done without his authority. In theory once lieutenant–governors were appointed, as in New Zealand after 1846, they would conduct the administration of their provinces, and certain executive powers would be delegated to them under the supervision of the governor–in–chief.

New Zealand was initially under the adminstration of the New South Wales governor, Sir George Gipps. On 3 May 1841 the country became a Crown colony in its own right and Hobson was elevated from lieutenant–governor to governor. Hobson died on 10 September 1842 after a series of illnesses which left many of his duties to his few officials. His replacement was Captain Robert FitzRoy, governor from 26 December 1843 until 17 November 1845. It was during his term of office that the Otakou purchase was negotiated. The Hobson and FitzRoy administrations were periods of considerable economic and political difficulty. Government was severely under–resourced and under–funded. Tensions between Maori and settlers, and between both races and the Crown remained unresolved. With the appointment of Captain George Grey, backed by Imperial troops and much stronger financial support, the Crown was able to take the initiative."

(The Ngāi Tahu Report 1991, Section 5.2.1, Waitangi Tribunal, Department of Justice, Wellington)

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TAGS

1853 • Aotearoa New ZealandAustraliaCommonwealthconstitution • Crown colony • George Gipps • George Grey • governor • IndigenousMaoriNew South Wales • Ngāi Tahu • NSWOtago • Otakou • race • Robert FitzRoy • settlementSouth IslandTe Tiriti o WaitangitreatyTreaty of WaitangitribevaluesWilliam Hobson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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