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24 APRIL 2010

Long Live Postdisciplinary Studies!

"Interdisciplinary studies are not enough, for at worst they provide a space in which members of different disciplines can bring their points of view together in order to compete behind a thin disguise of cooperation, so the researchers don't actually escape from their home disciplines – at best they merely offer the prospect of such an escape.

Post–disciplinary studies emerge when scholars forget about disciplines and whether ideas can be identified with any particular one; they identify with learning rather than with disciplines. They follows ideas and connections wherever they lead instead of following them only as far as the border of their discipline. It doesn't mean dilettantism or eclecticism, ending up doing a lot of things badly. It differs from those things precisely because it requires us to follow connections. One can still study a coherent group of phenomena, in fact since one is not dividing it up and selecting out elements appropriate to a particular discipline, it can be more coherent than disciplinary studies.

It's common to say one can only do interdisciplinary studies after one has first got a good grounding in a particular discipline. This is a kind of holding position for conservatives, involving minimal compromise: it also reduces the chances of those who go on to attempt interdisciplinary studies of leaving their discipline."

(Andrew Sayer, 1999)

Fig.1 Diane F. Ramos, 2008. 'Polarican', M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition, The George Washington University.

2). Andrew Sayer, 'Long Live Postdisciplinary Studies! Sociology and the curse of disciplinaryparochialism/imperialism', published by the Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YN, UK

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TAGS

1999context • dilettantism • disciplinary imperialism • disciplinary knowledge • disciplinary parochialism • disciplinesdiscursive fieldeclecticismenquiryinterdisciplinarity • interdisciplinary studies • knowledgeLancaster University • post-disciplinary studies • post-disciplinepostdisciplinary • postdisciplinary studies • pursuit of knowledgerelationsilosociologywhole reality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MARCH 2010

The Free Decimal Correspondence

"The Free Decimal Correspondence, or FDC for short, is a set of decimal numbers ranging from 000 to 999[.9999...], each associated with a particular subject, discipline, or group of subjects and disciplines. It's intended to be reasonably compatible with existing and commonly used library decimal classifications and subject headings, but also as freely usable and adaptable as possible. ...

Many libraries use such a system to arrange their books on a shelf (or their electronic items in a list) in the order given by the decimal numbers, so that they're organized in a general hierarchy with items on similar subjects located near each other. These numbers, when assigned to particular items, are referred to as 'call numbers'. For instance, if you're interested in political science, you could go to the items with call numbers between 310 and 320, and find lots of political science resources on similar topics presented next to each other. And you'll find other social sciences nearby as well.

Decimal systems can also be used to give a language–independent representation of a particular concept. (So, for instance, 'mathematics' in English and 'matematica' in Italian can both be expressed by the FDC decimal code '510'.) You can also use FDC to label sets of items you've associated with particular decimal numbers and ranges. ...

The most commonly used decimal call number system is the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC). We've tried to make this classification compatible with the present–day Dewey system, so the numbers will in many cases be similar in DDC and FDC for similar subjects."

(John Mark Ockerbloom)

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TAGS

call numbers • categoryclassification • DDC • decimal classification • decimal correspondence • decimal system • Dewey Decimal Classificationdisciplines • FDC • Free Decimal Correspondence • hierarchyindexinformation in contextlibrary • library decimal classification • orderingrelationrepresentationsubjecttaxonomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MARCH 2010

The Social Construction of Knowledge

"The partiality of the view of the world portrayed by science leaves a great deal unsaid and untheorised, even though, from a scientific point of view, knowledge is characterised as a unified field (Feyerabend, P) Furthermore, a significant aspect of the partiality of science is embedded in its supposed objectivity. It portrays the world from everywhere and nowhere at the same time. Scientific utterances about reality are without human agency. It describes the world as it is, not as any particular scientist views it. Yet science itself is the product of human agency. Its proponents have beliefs and prejudices which they purport to leave aside when they are engaged in the business of science. The power of Foucault's analysis, is to show that this objectivity is an illusion. What he suggests is that science, the paramount foundation of knowledge in our society, is ideologically contaminated – that it operates for and through specific power interests whose view of the world it reinforces. Since almost the entire edifice of knowledge and education is built upon this foundation, the assertion clearly requires further explication."

(Tony Ward, 2008)

Feyerabend, P., Against Method, Verso, London, 1988.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2009

Pedestrian Rhetoric and Scaffolding for Meaning

"naked city's fragments are linked by arrows, but fragments which are linked to each other are in different orientations and do not have any logical or straightforward relation to each other. the fragments do not include all of paris and the distance of the gaps between fragments do not illustrate the real distance between fragments. the arrows, while facilitating the egress of our imaginary psychogeographical wanderer, also seems to put spatial distance between the fragments, creating the gap, which is like what Michel de Certeau (chapter on Walking in the City – The Practice of Everyday Life) describes as a procedure of 'Asyndeton', or 'opening gaps in the spatial continuum' and 'retaining only selected parts of it that amount almost to relics'."

(无认屋)

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TAGS

1957architecturecontingencydesigndiagramdiscursive fieldengagementenvironmentephemeraeveryday lifefragmentaryfragmentsGuy Debord • in context • in situinformation spaceinterpretationmapmeaningMichel de Certeau • Naked City • orderingParisplacepsychogeographyrelationrhetoric • scaffolding • Situationistssocial interactionspacestructuretactic • Walking in the City • wanderer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2009

Charles Leadbeater: We Think

Read 'We Think' Research Reports covering: Web 2.0 Overview; Web 2.0; Wikipedia; Linux; Brazil and Open Source; World of Warcraft; Encyclopaedia of Life; Human Genome; M–Pesa; Ubuntu.

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TAGS

20082Danimated presentationanimationappropriationauthorshipBrazilCharles Leadbeaterconstellationscritical theorydemocracydialogic • Encyclopaedia of Life • human genome projectinstructional designintegrationknowledgelearningLinux • M-Pesa • mass democratisationopen sourceownershipparticipationpedagogyrelationremix culturescriptibletheory building • Think We • Ubuntu • video essayWeb 2.0Wikipedia • World of Warcraft

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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