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Which clippings match 'Occupied Territories' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 OCTOBER 2013

'Disappearing Palestine' Ads On TransLink Anger Jewish Groups

Charlotte Kates, a spokeswoman for seven Vancouver–based groups calling themselves the Palestine Awareness Coalition "said the images, which went up in Vancouver on Tuesday, show the steady occupation of Palestinian territory by Israel. The coalition got the idea for the 'Disappearing Palestine' campaign from similar ads that have run in American cities like New York, Seattle and San Francisco.

'We wanted to draw attention to and shed light on the ongoing human rights violations ... against Palestinians,' she said.

'The Canadian government has been such a strong voice in support of Israel ... so we think it's particularly important that people in Vancouver and other Canadian cities learn about what's happening in Palestine now and what's happened there historically.'

Jewish groups have declared strong opposition to the ads, which are displayed at a wall mural in a Vancouver SkyTrain station as well as on 15 buses, and have tried to have TransLink, a government agency, remove them."

(Kim Nursall, 28 August 2013, The Canadian Press)

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TAGS

19462012ad campaignawareness raisingbillboard • billboard campaign • Canada • conflict narrative • controversy • Disappearing Palestine (campaign) • hegemonic discoursehegemony • incite hatred • IsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictJewish peoplemainstream mediamaps • media attention • Middle Eastoccupied territoriesoccupying power • Palestine Awareness Coalition • Palestinian cause • Palestinian territories • poster campaign • pro-Zionist groups • provocative attack • SkyTrain (Canada) • State of IsraelState of Palestineterritorial bordersterritorialisationterritoryThis Land Is Minetrain station • TransLink • Vancouver

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2005

Christian forces humiliating Muslims in their own heartland

"[Islam, like Christianity] is fuelled by diverse factors. Some point to the growing resentment of being humiliated by the Christian West. The invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq have been the most recent causes for resentment, of Christian forces humiliating Muslims in their own heartland. The support of Israel by the United States to the neglect of the Palestinian people only confirms such resentment in the minds of many. But there are other factors as well. Many young, educated males in Muslim lands cannot find jobs. Since Western technology has failed them, they turn to their faith. The sheer pace of globalisation, and the migration of Muslims out of majority–Muslim countries into a Muslim diaspora have created an alienation that makes people cling more to their faith. Movements of revival have been moving through the Muslim world since the 1930s, but the recent developments of globalisation and migration have brought them to the attention of the rest of the world. As recently as the early 1990s, French scholar Olivier Roy saw worldwide Islam as too decentralised and too disorganised to make much social difference. Today, he speaks more carefully about what he sees happening."

(Robert J. Schreiter, p.5)

2). Schreiter, R. J. (2005). "A New Modernity: Living and Believing in an Unstable World". The Anthony Jordan Lectures, Newman Theological College, Edmonton Alberta, March 18–19, 2005 p.5. http://www.mission–preciousblood.org/Docsfiles/schreiter_new_modernity.pdf (Accessed 10 August 2005).

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08 OCTOBER 2003

Placelessness: Alphaville

There are numerous films that deal with issues relating to non–place. One key example if the 1965 film Alphaville, made by Jean Luc Godard about a futuristic city where its inhabitants are controlled/programmed by a central computer. At no time during the film does it feel that any of the inhabitants actually reside or belong to the city. The city appears to be a conduit between the objectives of its master and it's subjects. The city is a non–place that facilitates occupation and transport without offering placement. The institutional nature of engagement within the narrative space reinforces this. Rooms speak their status without addressing anyone specifically, compass references are offered but without any clear connection to a specific geography. The only avenue for escape for the film's protagonist (and his love–interest), is to exit through another non–place: one of the city's interstate highways.

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