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Which clippings match 'Virtual Environments' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/Métis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

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TAGS

2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2015

A Serious Game Model for Cultural Heritage

"Serious games present a promising opportunity for learning, but the genre still lacks methodologies and tools for efficient and low-cost production, particularly for teacher and domain experts. This article gives an authoring framework that aims to provide structured support, from content design to final implementation. In particular, we have abstracted a conceptual model—the SandBox Serious Game - which relies on a generalization of task-based learning theory. The model invites players to perform cognitive tasks contextually while exploring information-rich virtual environments. We consider it particularly suited for cultural heritage entertainment applications. The model defines games that are set in realistic virtual worlds enriched with embedded educational tasks, which we have implemented as minigames. This approach simplifies the authoring work, which can easily be supported by visual authoring tools for ontology-based urban 3D modeling and implementation tasks, thus allowing an approach similar to the mind-maps concept. We propose a top-down methodology for content preparation, starting from a city- level analysis down to the single points of interest and associated tasks, which are instances of simple predefined minigame/quiz typologies. We provide examples and discuss criteria for selecting task typologies according to the authors’ cognitive targets. Finally, we discuss the results of a user test, which took place in a lab, aimed at verifying the acquisition of cultural heritage knowledge in a pleasant and engaging way. Games appear particularly suited for supporting the study of images, especially of iconography. Compared to reading text, a game forces the player to focus more strongly on problems, which favors knowledge acquisition and retention. Learning complex concepts requires an investigative attitude, which can be spurred by well-designed games. Good design involves usability, graphic appeal, appropriate content, and the presence of connections which a player must discover in the content. Players should be asked to pay attention to and reason about their whole game activity - including the relationships between the game content, the brief introduction, and concluding texts. More comprehensive tests are needed to better investigate the educational effectiveness—however, the first results are promising, especially in terms of user motivation and creation of new opportunities for learning about CH."

(Francesco Bellotti, Riccardo Berta, Alessandro De Gloria, Annamaria D’ursi, Valentina Fiore, 2012)

Bellotti, F., Berta, R., De Gloria, A., D’Ursi, A., and V. Fiore, V. 2012. A serious game model for cultural heritage. ACM J. Comput. Cult. Herit. 5, 4, Article 17 (October 2012), 27 pages. DOI=10.1145/2399180.2399185 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2399180.2399185

TAGS

20123D modelling • Alessandro De Gloria • Annamaria D ursi • authoring framework • city-level analysis • cognitive targets • cognitive tasks • conceptual model • content connections • content design • content preparation • cultural heritage knowledge • discovering and exploring • discovery through games • educational effectiveness • embedded educational tasks • entertainment applications • Francesco Bellotti • game authoring • game content • graphic appeal • iconography • investigative attitude • Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH) • knowledge acquisition and retention • low-cost production • minigame • points of interest • production methodologies • quiz typologies • realistic virtual worlds • Riccardo Berta • sandbox serious game • serious games • task typologies • task-based learning theory • top-down methodology • usabilityuser motivationsuser testing • Valentina Fiore • virtual environments • visual authoring tools

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Free 3D Software and 3D Model Providers

"The DAZ FREE 3D Software promotion is three award–winning 3D software products now available for the first time ever for free."

(DAZ Productions, Inc.)

Fig. 2&3 IT'S ART Magazine

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TAGS

3D3D animation • 3D environments • 3D visualisation • ambient occlusion • animation package • animation toolartwork • Bryce 7 Pro • CGCGIcharacter animation • DAZ 3D • DAZ Free 3D Software • DAZ Studio • DAZ Studio Bridge • DAZ Studio Pro • design tool • digital artdigital illustration • Eric Wenger • fantasy art • figure • figure customisation • free tools • freehand modelling • graphic artist • Hexagon (software) • Kai Krause • lifelikemodelling • modelling tool • models • Phil Clevenger • posingpuppeteer • render • rendering • Renderman • representation • sculpted primitives • software package • texturing • UVMapper • virtual environmentsvirtual peopleZBrush • Zygote

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Wolfenstein 3D: Pac-Man intragame

"An intragame is a game within the game, e.g. the Pachinko machine in Duke Nukem 3D [or a Pac–Man level in Wolfenstein 3D]. Since computer games are based on simulator technology that could mix or include any other game in addition to the main game, the main game will be the only one classified."

(Aarseth, Smedstad and Sunnanå, 2003, p.49)

1). Video capture of secret Pac–Man level within Episode 3 of Wolfenstein 3D.

2). Table of Contents for Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

3). Espen Aarseth, Solveig Marie Smedstad and Lise Sunnanå (2003). 'A multi–dimensional typology of games', in Copier, Marinka; Raessens, Joost, Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

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TAGS

19923Daction hero • Adrian Carmack • Apogee SoftwareCastle Wolfensteincomputer gamesdigital cultureDiGRADuke Nukem 3Deaster eggEspen Aarsethfirst-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • game genres • game within the game • gameplaygames • id Software • intragame • Lise Sunnana • mise-en-abymeNaziPac-Man • Pachinko • PC gamesreflexivityrun and gunScott Miller • shareware • Solveig Marie Smedstad • tribute • typology of games • video gamevirtual environmentsWolfenstein 3D

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2011

Antlion Soccer: first-person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects

"In early 2007, we were awarded a speculative research grant to investigate the use of first–person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects. A small development studio has been established and has produced a completed single–user experience, based upon the Source engine. A second experimental single–player experience is at beta stage, and a third is planned. The completed mod embeds extensive, randomised narrative fragments in audio triggers throughout a bespoke environment. supplemented by abstract visual and audio media assets. [...] The second mod subverts traditional squad–based play by using custom fixed–state AI expansion of existing Half Life 2 agents to create an experience where the player becomaes leader of a helpless squad with discernible individual characteristics in a hostile environment. Although it is not envisaged that this will be completed at the time of presentation, a proof–of–concept demo will be on display. Finally, footage and information of an additional, multiplayer game developed to test mod concepts and already in the public domain will be displayed"

(Videogame Visionary)

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2007AHRC • Antlion Soccer • applied researchconceptualisation • Dan Pinchbeck • demoDiGRAdiscoveryenquiryexperience • experimental narrative • experimentationfirst-personfootballFPSgame designgamesgames research • gaming platforms • Half-Life (video game) • mod • multiplayer game • narrativeposter presentationresearchsingle-player • single-user experience • speculative researchtheory building • vgvisionary • Videogame Visionary • virtual environments

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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