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Which clippings match 'Degrees Of Interrelation' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 MAY 2005

Differance: the formation of form

"The word 'differance', spelled with an 'a', is a coined term, and Derrida contrasts it with the vernacular term 'difference'. Patterns of 'Difference,' he explains, [are ] ...'produced' – deferred –– by 'differance' (Derrida, 1982, p.14). But what does this mean? That difference is deferred by differance? Imagine observing a quilt on the wall with patches of yellow, blue and white. If you notice the yellow and the non–yellow, you see a pattern of concentric boxes. If you notice the blue and the non–blue you see a chequered design. Each pattern is a play of differences, but it is a different set of differences when yellow is differentiated from non–yellow than when blue is differentiated from non–blue, a different set of differences that shows us different patterns. What is interesting about this shift from one pattern to the other is that it not only calls our attention to a new pattern, but that it suppresses our awareness of the other pattern. DifferAnce, defers a pattern of differences (say the pattern of differences between the blue and the not–blue). That is, one pattern of differences pushes into the background another possible play of patterns. You cannot study the pattern of yellows and the pattern of blues at the same time because differance causes one or the other patterns to be 'deferred'. DifferAnce is the hidden way of seeing things that is deferred out of awareness by our distraction with the imagery that captures our attention. Because it contains this other way to see things 'DifferAnce is the...formation of form.'(Derrida, 1976, p.63)."

(Lois Shawver)

Derrida, Jacques. 1982 Differance. In Jacques Derrida (Ed.), Margins of Philosophy, Chicago, USA: The University of Chicago Press.Derrida, Jacques. 1976 Grammatology, Baltimore, USA: The Johns Hopkins.



defer • deferment • degrees of interrelationdifferanceformation of formJacques Derrida • Lois Shawver • neographism • pattern • patterns of difference • polysemouspolysemyquiltvernacular
20 JANUARY 2004

Constellation Model of Relations

Walter Benjamin dispels teleological historicism in place of a constellation model of relations. For him the arrangement of the arcade is symbolic of general urban design. All aspects, despite their apparent significance have bearing on all other aspects. Classical Marxist economic and cultural causation is replaced with degrees of interrelation, experienced by a Flaneur (or stroller) as they traverse a given environment.

Benjamin, Walter. 2002 das passagen–werk [the arcades project], , US: harvard university press. 0674008022


arcadem • constellation • constellation modelconstellationsconstellations metaphordegrees of interrelationflaneur • Marx • strollerWalter Benjamin

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