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Which clippings match 'Games Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 OCTOBER 2012

The offcial trailer of Alice Madness

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TAGS

2011 • Aarne-Thompson classification system • Alice in WonderlandAlice Madness Returnscomputer gamesfantasy characterfantasy elementsgame worldgames designIGNvideo gameXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
22 OCTOBER 2012

Alice: Madness Returns gameplay Demo.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
02 NOVEMBER 2009

UNITY: Fully Integrated Games Editor

"The Unity game engine is happily married to the Unity development environment. This tight integration allows the Editor to do everything a published game can do. The simple, visual, and intuitive nature of the Editor makes building games fun again."

(Unity Technologies ApS)

[30 day Unity Pro trial available]

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TAGS

3Dapplication • ARM assembler code • authoring environmentcharacter animationDenmarkdesign • DirectX • editorgame enginegamesgames designgames editorIDEiPhoneiPod TouchMacMicrosoft WindowsOpenGLsoftwaresolutiontechnologytoolUnity (game engine)Unity 3D • Unity Development Environment • Unity Studios • Unity Technologies • Unity Web Player • Wii • XCode

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2008

Writing for Games

"I'm the in–house Screenwriter at Free Radical. I write everything from pitch documents to the screenplay; signposting dialogue and A.I strings to the manual.

It's a pretty unusual position to be in because if – and it's a big if – a developer gets a writer involved in a project, they're usually freelance. So, they might write the screenplay, but a designer or programmer could end up writing the additional dialogue. Being full–time means I can ensure that there's a consistency throughout the writing for the entire game."
(Rob Yescombe, in–house screenwriter for Free Radical Design, 23rd July 2007)

[Joe Martin at bit–tech.net discusses the definition of the screenwriter role in UK games design.]

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TAGS

creative practiceFree Radical Designgamesgames designHazenarrativescreenwriting • TimeSplitters • UKwriting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2008

NESTA: online service delivery for games becomes more important

"The UK has one of the strongest talent pools in the world today. However, UK studios that specialise in particular (often heavily saturated) genres such as racing and action, may find it hard to adapt as faster and cheaper development regions emerge, and online service delivery becomes more important. The UK's independent games developers' historic ability to create original games with global appeal has been threatened by the increasing costs and risk of games development, and limited access to sources of funding. This has led to fewer original games and more work for hire (where an independent studio produces games that are owned by someone else for lower shares of future revenues). The UK's most successful independent studios derive two thirds of their gross revenues from work for hire. A reliance on this work is a long term threat to the UK sector's sustainability because it allows only a marginal profit (rather than a royalty cushion from proprietary IP), is patchy (unlike the steady cash flow from online games models) and relies on increasingly cost–conscious clients with incentives to contract projects with cheaper studios in Eastern Europe and Asia."

(NESTA, UK)

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TAGS

creative economycreative industrieseconomyenterpriseentrepreneurshipFree Radical Designgamesgames designgames developmentgames industryHazeinnovationinvestmentmanagementmultimediaNESTA • online games • Raise the Game Report • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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