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20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2013

Meetdraw: Dorset creative industries networking

"Meetdraw is a meeting of digital animals to talk about and share collective passions. For everyone, no matter what they do or what stage they are in their career. It's for us by us. At times aided by beer, we shall fuel creativity, ideas and inspiration in a relaxed informal and fun environment. ... We support the local (Dorset) creative economy and provide an independent, neutral and open platform for communication and development."

(Paul Seys, 7 December 2009)

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TAGS

2009advertising agenciesadvertising agency • Andy Brown • Ann Talboys • beer • Bella Lewis-Smith • Bright Blue Day (agency) • Caroline Sharp • Chris Robinson • collective passions • Createful (agency) • creative communitycreative economy • creative hub • creative industriescreative industries practitionercreative network • Crowd (agency) • David Ford • design consultancydesign industry • digital animals • digital solutions • digital talent • Dorset • Folk (agency) • fuel creativity • getting connected • industry leading • informal events • integrated agency • Jamie Sergeant • local businesseslocal creative communitylocal creative producerslocal designers • Luke Bonner • Matt Desmier • Meetdraw • meeting • meetupnetworking eventnetworking eventsnetworks of social interactionopen event • Paul Seys • Poole • professional designersprofessional gathering • promoting digital talent • Rad Dougall • Salad Creative (agency) • Simon Melaniphy • StudioWorks (agency) • The Emerge Group • The Healthcounter (online pharmacy) • Thinking Juice (agency) • Toby James Pestridge • Tom Wittlin • UKup and comersweb and related creative industries • Wise Old Uncle (designer)

CONTRIBUTOR

Bu Dmd
27 APRIL 2013

A Manifesto for the UK Creative Economy

"The UK's creative economy is one of its great national strengths, historically deeply rooted and accounting for around one–tenth of the whole economy. It provides jobs for 2.5 million people – more than in financial services, advanced manufacturing or construction – and in recent years, this creative workforce has grown four times faster than the workforce as a whole.

But behind this success lies much disruption and business uncertainty, associated with digital technologies. Previously profitable business models have been swept away, young companies from outside the UK have dominated new internet markets, and some UK creative businesses have struggled to compete.

UK policymakers too have failed to keep pace with developments in North America and parts of Asia. But it is not too late to refresh tired policies. This manifesto sets out our 10–point plan to bolster one of the UK's fastest growing sectors."

(Hasan Bakhshi, Ian Hargreaves and Juan Mateos–Garcia, April 2013, NESTA)

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TAGS

2013 • advanced manufacturing • Asiabusiness models • business uncertainty • constructioncreative businessescreative economycreative industriescreative services innovation • creative workforce • digital technologiesdisruptive innovationeconomic growthentrepreneurshipfinancial services • Hasan Bakhshi • hi-tech start-up • Ian Hargreaves • innovation in the UKjobs • Juan Mateos-Garcia • knowledge-based economymanifestomentoringmentoring schemeNESTA • new business • new internet markets • North Americaopen innovationpolicy makerspublic services • Rachel Grant • social innovationtechnology innovationUKUK innovationventure capitalworkforce • young companies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 NOVEMBER 2012

The creative industries provided twice as many UK jobs as financial services

"This Monday, [Andrew] Marr hosted a special edition of Start the Week on BBC Radio 4 to celebrate the RCA's 175th anniversary with guests including former RCA rector and Arts Council chair Sir Christopher Frayling.

In the show, Frayling pointed out that the creative industries provided twice as many UK jobs as financial services, but that this contribution went unnoticed.

'What I never understand is, there are so many column inches about financial services all the time,' Frayling told Marr. 'Financial services contributes about 1% more than the creative industries, which employ two million people whereas financial services employ one million people. So in terms of contribution to the economy generally, the creative industries actually have it over financial services in almost every way. And how many column inches about it? Very little. So there's this huge impact but people don't seem to be noticing.'

In his article, Marr argues that because the economic value of art schools is difficult to measure, politicians fail to appreciate their importance to the economy.

'And there's where I think the trouble lies,' Marr concludes. 'To invest in art and design means putting public money into areas whose value cannot be captured on a spreadsheet, where concepts like productivity, value–for–money, inputs and outputs–which so reassure the political world–simply collapse. That means faith. It means risk.

'But, without it, hard times surely stretch out rather bleakly. Other countries understand this, including China where more than a thousand art and design colleges are operating and whose students greatly benefit from colleges here too."

(Dezeen, 21 November 2012)

Fig.1 Jim Rokos "22° 36° 48°", fruit bowl [http://rokos.co.uk/].

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TAGS

175th anniversary2012Andrew Marrart and designart schoolsArts Council (UK)BBC Radio 4Christopher Frayling • creative contribution • creative economycreative industries • difficult to measure • economic valuefinancial servicesimpact on the economy • importance to the economy • inputs and outputs • invest in art and design • jobsPeoples Republic of China • political world • productivitypublic moneyRCA • reassurance • riskRoyal College of ArtStart the WeekUKvalue and benefitvalue for money

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2012

The Korea Institute of Design Promotion

"Korea (South) has recognized design as the future growth engine and has introduced 'Building a Creative Design Nation' as a new government project. The Korea Institute of Design Promotion (KIDP) lies at the center of national design promotion policies. KIDP has been putting its best efforts into promoting Korea as a global leader in the design community and as a result, has created a global design portal site that will compile design information in an integrated and systematic way.

Global DesignDB.com is an integrated online service system set up to manage the latest design information for designers and others involved in the global design industry. It will act as a 'Design Navigator' for anyone interested in design. We look forward to your continuous interests and support."

(The Korea Institute of Design Promotion)

Fig.1 Suzy Sunsook Cho, Package Design [http://suzycho.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/package–design.html].

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TAGS

197021st centuryapplied arts • Building a Creative Design Nation • commoditycountry brandscreative design • creative design academy • creative design nation • creative economycreative industriescultural capitaldesign • design academy • design book cafe • design community • design companies • design information • design innovation • design navigator • design policy • design portal • design promotion • design promotion policies • designers • global design industry • government policy • government project • industrial centres • industrial competitiveness • innovative design • KIDP • knowledge economyKorea • Korea Institute of Design Promotion • national identity • North East Asia • Republic of Korea • South Korea

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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