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Which clippings match 'Human Rights' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 JULY 2015

Came by Boat: Vietnamese refugee who calls Australia home

"The riveting story of fleeing war-torn Vietnam for the safety of Australia, winner of the Audience Award in the Australian Shorts section at the Human Rights Arts Film Festival."

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2014 • Alisa Woraprangkul • Asia Pacific • asylumAustraliaboat • boat people • Carmen Holman • documentary filmhuman rights • Human Rights Arts Film Festival • immigration • Indochina • Malcolm Bloedel • Malcolm Fraser • Marleena Forward • Melbourne • Ning Xue • Peter Frost • refugee • refugee crisis • Shannon Owen • Steve Thomas • Then I Came by Boat (2014) • Tri Nguyen • Victorian College of the ArtsVietnamVietnam warVietnamese • Vietnamese boat people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2015

Berta Cáceres 2015 Goldman Prize Recipient South and Central America

"In a country with growing socioeconomic inequality and human rights violations, Berta Cáceres rallied the indigenous Lenca people of Honduras and waged a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam.

(Goldman Environmental Foundation)

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2015 • Agua Zarca Dam • Berta Caceres • blockade • Central America • community resistance • consultation • COPINH • dam • demand for cheap energy • Desarrollos Energeticos SA (DESA) • disenfranchised people • displaced indigenous communities • environmental activist • environmental impactenvironmentalist • environmentally destructive projects • Goldman Environmental Foundation • grassroots campaign • Gualcarque River • Hondurashuman rights • human rights activist • human rights violationIndigenous communities • indigenous rights • inspirational leader • Inter-American Human Rights Commission • International Finance Corporation (IFC) • landland custodianshipLatin America • Lenca people • mining • mining operations • murder • National Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras • peaceful protest • Rio Blanco • riversacred sites • Sinohydro • social activist • socioeconomic inequality • South Americasymbolic place • Tomas Garcia • uprooting communities • World Bank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

How would it feel to be represented by someone like Tony Abbott?

"Every week Tony Abbott makes another comment that reveals very concerning social views. Commentators blow them off as 'gaffes', but this isn't about gaffes. It's about values. It's about our national character if our Prime Minister labels refugees who seek our help as 'illegal', even as they exercise their legal, human right to flee danger. It's about the message we send to young gay and lesbian Australians, if our Prime Minister talks about their equality as a 'passing fashion,' and what that does to their self–esteem. It's about our values if a Prime Minister talks to 'the housewives of Australia as they're doing their ironing,' says his colleagues are 'not just a pretty face' and have 'sex appeal' and calls on his opponent to 'make an honest woman of herself'. Prime Ministers reflect our national values, and have the power to change them radically. Does what Tony Abbott says matter? Well, in 17 days he wants to be speaking for all of us. That's why GetUp members are launching this ad. Will you be part of it?"

(GetUp!)

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2013 • abortion rights • Australia • Australian Federal Government • Australian GovernmentAustralian Liberal Partycasual homophobiacivil libertiesconservativeconservative attitudesconservative catchphrasesequality • gaffes • gayGetUp!governancehousewifehuman rightsIndigenous Australiansintoleranceironinglesbianmisogyny • national character • national values • personal valuespoliticsPrime Ministerquoterefugeeself-esteemsexist languagesocial conservatismsocial responsibility • social views • Tony Abbott • values

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 APRIL 2012

William Forsythe: choreography as a reflection of social spheres

"In his installation performances such as Human Writes or Heterotopia, to which Forsythe has dedicated an increasing amount of his time in recent years, choreography becomes a social practice. Forsythe's installations are controlled test arrangements in which all the participants can observe themselves, their bodies and their movements together. When a performance like Human Writes deals in substance with the difficulties surrounding universal human rights, it becomes clear where the potential of dance and movement can lie. After all, it's not abstract universal laws alone that guarantee our co–existence. It is much more our physical actions, our daily movements that create and shape the community. Herein lies the political meaning of Forsythe's notion of dance. He creates spaces where he places people in a new, unknown relationship to themselves so that they reflect differently on their (social) spheres and in so doing explore their own potential scope for action."

(Gerald Siegmund, May 2008, Goethe–Institut)

Fig.3 Dominik Mentzos, "Human Writes", performance–Installation by William Forsythe and Kendall Thomas [http://www.theforsythecompany.com/pressphotos/humanwrites/].

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abstract universal laws • ballet • bodies • choreography • co-existence • community • confrontational • controlled test arrangements • create and shape • creative problem solvingcritique • daily movements • danceDominik Mentzosdrawdrawing • emplacement • experimentationGoethe-Institutheterotopiahuman rights • Human Writes (performance) • installation • installation performance • language of ballet • movementnomologicalparticipantsperformancephysical actions • political meaning • potential for action • relationshipssocial actionsocial changesocial practices • social spheres • space • the potential of dance and movement • universal human rights • universal laws • William Forsythe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 AUGUST 2009

International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs

"Over the past 35 years, [International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs] has published one of the most comprehensive collections of documentation and reflection on indigenous peoples' struggle for survival and recognition. IWGIA continues to be at the forefront of reflecting the most significant issues of concern to indigenous peoples. IWGIA's publications are published on a non–profit basis.
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IWGIA publishes mainly in English and Spanish but its documentation also includes books in French, Kiswahili (East Africa), Tagalok, Ilokano, Bisaya (Philippines), Bahasa Indonesia, Thai, Russian, Portuguese, Hindi and Swedish, as well as 13 educational booklets in Danish.

IWGIA publishes the journal Indigenous Affairs, a yearbook The Indigenous World both in English and in Spanish (Asuntos Indigenas and El Mundo Indigena), books, handbooks and reports.

IWGIA's publications are written by indigenous and non–indigenous scholars and activists. Our readers are NGO activists and specialists working with indigenous peoples or related issues, politicians, scholars with a special interest, indigenous activists and organisations, individuals and communities.

IWGIA's documentation and information material contributes to its overall aim of supporting indigenous peoples, as stated in IWGIA's mission statement. IWGIA documents the human rights and overall situation of indigenous peoples, promotes indigenous rights and facilitates and provides for discussions, influences decision makers and puts indigenous issues on the agenda of governments, NGOs, international institutions such as the UN, OAS, Arctic Council, etc., and corporate business world. It also nurtures discussions within academic and intellectual fora and contributes to indigenous peoples' capacity building and sharing of experience."
(IWGIA)

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activismAfricaArcticAsia • Asuntos Indigenas and El Mundo Indigena • CaribbeanCentral Americacitizenshipcivil rightsdemocratic participationempowermenthuman rightsIndigenousinternationalinternational community • International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs • IWGIAmembershipNGOOceaniaparticipationsocietySouth America • The Indigenous World • traditionUN

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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