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Which clippings match 'Edmund Husserl' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JANUARY 2013

Hermeneutic Phenomenology and Phenomenology: A Comparison of Historical and Methodological Considerations

"a variety of research methodologies have grown in popularity including phenomenology, ethnography, grounded theory, and hermeneutic phenomenology (Denzin & Lincoln, 2000). As this has occurred, concern has risen about the use of qualitative methodologies without sufficient understanding of the rigor necessary to ethically utilize them (Maggs–Rapport, 2001). More specifically, phenomenology and hermeneutic phenomenology are often referred to interchangeably, without questioning any distinction between them. The purpose of this article is to discuss the early philosophical development of selected key issues related to phenomenology and hermeneutic phenomenology and support the position that differences and similarities exist. This exploration will begin with the phenomenology of Husserl and then move to explore heremeneutic phenomenology through Heidegger and Gadamer. Exploration will be given to how these different philosophical perspectives have an impact on the practice of phenomenology and hermeneutic phenomenology as research methodologies."

(Susann M. Laverty, 2003)

Laverty, S. M. (2003). "Hermeneutic phenomenology and phenomenology: A comparison of historical and methodological considerations". International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 2(3). Article 3. Retrieved 06 January 2013 from http://www.ualberta.ca/~iiqm/backissues/2_3final/html/laverty.html

TAGS

conducting researchEdmund Husserlepistemologyethnography • form and nature of reality • Frances Maggs-Rapport • grounded theoryHans-Georg Gadamer • hermeneutic phenomenology • hermeneuticsInternational Journal of Qualitative MethodsMartin HeideggermethodologyNorman Denzinontological perspectiveontologyphenomenology • philosophical development • philosophical perspectives • qualitative methodologiesresearch methodologiesrigourYvonna Lincoln

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2012

Interaction-Design.org: Making research accessible since 2002

"The Interaction–Design.org Foundation is a labour of love founded by Mads Soegaard in 2002, and in 2010, his wife, Rikke Dam, joined the project. Apart from Rikke and Mads, hundreds of people have helped out and continue to do so.

We're on a mission to make free and open educational materials: There are so many great minds in the Human–Computer Interaction and Interaction Design community and we want to empower these authors to reach all their interested readers around the world. We believe these authors have the minds to change the world and deserve a publishing venue truly designed for the author and the reader, not the publisher and the profit."

(Mads Soegaard and Rikke Dam)

fig.1 Interview with Dag Svanaes by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Dam (2011). Video: "Philosophy of Interaction Video 2 – Guiding Principles of Interaction Design derived from Heidegger". Retrieved 15 June 2012 from http://www.interaction–design.org/tv/Philosophy_of_Interaction_Video2_Guiding_Principles_of_Interaction_Design_derived_from_Heidegger.html

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TAGS

2002authorschange the worldconceptual model • designed for the author and the reader • Edmund Husserlemotional designethnography • free and open educational materials • human-computer interactioninformation architectureinformation visualisationinteraction design • Interaction Design community • Interaction Design Foundationinteraction design research • interested readers • labour of love • Mads Soegaard • Martin HeideggerOpen Educational Resources (OER)publisher and the profit • publishing venue • Rikke Dam • usabilityuser experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2009

Kantian Euclidean Space and Husserlian Material Ontologies

"When considering the relevance of Kant's transcendental position on Euclidean space, one widespread complaint goes something like this: In what concerns the transcendental validity of mathematics in experience, Kant failed to distinguish between pure and applied geometry the way we do today. Pure geometry, as Hilbert showed, is a mere mathematical multiplicity, an axiomatic system interwoven by means of formal relationships where a priori intuition plays no role at all. Its claims have no empirical content whatsoever. Applied geometry, on the other hand, as exemplified by the use of non–Euclidean geometries by Einstein, has to do with the application of a formal geometrical structure as a means of depicting the empirical world. This application is done under certain theoretical assumptions and the postulation of an empirical spatial congruence. Once the coordination of the geometrical structure with the empirical phenomena is established, it can be empirically tested. There is no place for the idea that Euclidean geometry is a priori and synthetic, a transcendental constitutive of experience. Euclidean geometry is just a possible 'mathematical multiplicity', a formal structure whose correspondence with the physical world is not imposed. Thus, the transcendental a priori validity of geometry for all possible experience as implicitly ascertained in the mathematical principles of the pure understanding appears to have been refuted."

(José Ruiz Fernández, 2003)

Essays in Celebration of the Founding of the Organization of Phenomenological Organizations. Ed. CHEUNG, Chan–Fai, Ivan Chvatik, Ion Copoeru, Lester Embree, Julia Iribarne, & Hans Rainer Sepp. Web– Published at www.o–p–o.net, 2003

TAGS

20032D3DAlbert Einstein • angles • applied geometry • conceptualisationdeductionEdmund HusserlEuclidEuclidean space • formal geometrical structure • geometryImmanuel Kantlinesmathematical model • mathematical multiplicity • mathematicsphysical world • points • pure geometry • representation • solids • space • surfaces • transcendental • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2008

Podcasting Heidegger's Being and Time

"One of the most important philosophical works of the twentieth century, Being and Time is both a systematization of the existential insights of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche and a radicalization of Husserl's phenomenological account of intentionality. What results is an original interpretation of the human condition leading to an account of the nature and limitations of philosophical and scientific theory. This account has important implications for all those disciplines that study human beings."
(Hubert Dreyfus, UC Berkeley)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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