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Which clippings match 'Protection' keyword pg.1 of 3
07 NOVEMBER 2013

Virtual girl called 'Sweetie' used to stop webcam child sex tourism

"To show how unrestrained child predators can act but also to show how easy it is to track them down the Dutch child rights organisation put itself in the shoes of a 10-year-old Filipino girl. With an innovative technology the virtual character Sweetie was created to be controlled by Terre des Hommes researchers. From a remote building in Amsterdam the researchers operated in public chat rooms. In a very short period, over 20,000 predators from around the world approached the virtual 10- year-old, asking for webcam sex performances. While the adults interacted with the virtual girl, the researchers gathered information about them through social media to uncover their identities. With this evidence Terre des Hommes Netherlands is pushing all governments to adopt proactive investigation policies, with a world wide petition, starting today."

(Hans Guyt, The Hague, 4 November 2013, Terre des Hommes)

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20133D visualisationAmsterdamavatarbelievabilitybotchat roomchild abuse • child exploitation • child pornographychild protection • child rights • child sex tourism • child victims • developing nationsdigital actorsexploitation • Filipino • girl • Hans Guyt • human-likehyperrealismillegal behaviour • innovative technology • law enforcementlifelikelolitaNetherlandsonline youth victimisation • perpetrator • Philippines • post-traumatic stress • posting onlinepredatorprotectionpuppetreal-life dollsafeguardingsex crimesex offenders • sex tourism • sexual acts • sexual exploitationsexual fetishsexual slaverysexualised depictions • Sweetie (virtual girl) • synthespian • Terre des Hommes • victimvirtual charactervirtual girlvisual depictionvoyeurismvulnerabilityvulnerable groupsvulnerable peoplewebcam • webcam child sex tourism • webcam sex • young childrenyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti-feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti-trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti-trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspective • feminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate women • trafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2013

The key image of the present day is the man in the motor car

"In all of these experiments, aborted works, happenings, events, the motif of the car crash is crucial. Ballard sought to understand the role that automobile styling, and mass consumerism, plays in our lives. His sights were set on what he saw as the built-in death drive that technology embodies, the effacing of identity, the shutting off of our neurological systems. Our willingness to submit to the amniotic bliss of the technological womb. Of course, today we know where all this would eventually beach: his 1973 masterpiece, Crash. But in 1971 Ballard was still pushing the farthest limits of his obsession, refining riffs and routines, expanding the parameters of the car crash as far as popular culture would allow. Crucially this was far beyond the stuffy confines of 'literature', which Ballard has never had much time for, and into visual art and film: the realm of the popular imaginary."

(Simon Sellars, 10 August 2007, Ballardian)

Fig.1 dir. Harley Cokeliss, "Towards Crash!", 1971. 16 mm Eastmancolor transferred to video, sound, 17:34 min. Courtesy the artist. BBC TV 1971.

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16mm197120th centuryBBC TVBBC2 • bodily form • bodybody experiencecarcar crash • car wash • collisionconsumerismcrashcrash test • crash test dummy • death • Eastmancolor • experimental filmGabrielle Drake • Harley Cokeliss • Harley Cokliss • J G Ballard • James Mossman • Kodak Eastmanmachine aesthetic • motorcar • motoristprotection • romancing technology • romanticismsex and machines • styling • technological shaping of sociality • technological system • technoromanticism • The Atrocity Exhibition (1970) • Towards Crash (1971) • traumavisual codes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2013

The Invisible Bicycle Helmet

"Fredrik Gertten profiles two idealistic young female entrepreneurs who created a revolutionary 21st-century design object everyone told them would be impossible to fashion."

(Focus Forward Films, 2012)

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2012 • airbag • Anna Haupt • bicycle • bicycle helmet • bikebusiness womencollisioncrashcrash testcrashworthinessdesign innovationdesign studentsentrepreneurentrepreneurship • Focus Forward Films • Fredrik Gertten • GE Focus Forward • helmethighway safetyindustrial designinvention • invisible bicycle helmet • Lund Universityproduct designproduct designerprotectionprototyperoad safetysafetysafety by designSwedishtechnical innovation • Terese Alstin • The Swedish Film Institute • WG Film • women designerswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Concerning Intellectual Property: a conversation with Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (part four)

"In some ways, independent media-makers seem caught in the middle of this struggle, seeking ways to protect their own creative products, but also often at the mercy of bigger corporate interests. What do we gain by looking at the issues from their perspective?"

(Henry Jenkins)

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TAGS

best practicesbig media • codes of best practices • copyright • corporate interests • creative productsdebateDIY • Ellen Seiter • fair useHenry Jenkins • independent media makers • independent media-makers • indie mediaintellectual propertylawlegislationmonopoly • moral-panic • noncommercial creators • Pat Aufderheide • PIPApiracypolicyprotectionremixsocial consciousnessSOPA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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