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Which clippings match 'Electronic Media' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 JUNE 2013

How to Cite Interviews

"Interviews are a useful means of obtaining information from individuals who have been directly involved with the topic or period one is researching. Such individuals are 'primary sources' who can provide data or perspectives which may not be available from other sources. Individual interviews are normally used to establish or support particular points in a paper; a series of structured interviews may also comprise an entire 'original research component' of a paper if they form a coherent body of new information on the research topic."

(University of Tampere, 22 January 2012)

TAGS

academic citation • book interviews • broadcast interviews • chat interviews • citation • citing electronic sources • citing interviews • citing print sources • coherent body of knowledge • data collectione-mail interviewselectronic media • electronic sources • Gerard Hopkins • individual interviewsindividual perspectives • instant messaging interviews • interview (research method)interviews • live broadcast interviews • magazine interviews • MLA • Modern Language Association • new information • original research • personal interviewsprimary sourcesprint media • published interviews • radio interviews • research paperresearch sourcesresearch topicstructured interviews • telephone interviews • television interviews • University of Tamperevideo interviews • webcast interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2012

V2_Institute for the Unstable Media

"In the turbulent year of 1981 the building at Vughterstraat 234 in Den Bosch was squatted by a group of artists and musicians, including a young Joke Brouwer and an almost as young Alex Adriaansens. There was no place for their sounds, art or ideas in the established venues, so they created one of their own at 'V234,' quickly shortened to 'V2.' September 3 and 4, 1981 the first events where organized. In 1982, these pragmatic anarchists decided to organize themselves into a foundation, and V2_ was officially born."

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TAGS

1981 • 3D projection • Alex Adriaansens • art in electronic networks • art installationart productionartist collectiveartistic means • arts practice • audiovisual arts • centre for art and media technology • communications media • computers as an artistic medium • cyberspace • Den Bosch • digital imagery • digital techniques • do-it-yourself • Dutch Electronic Art Festival • Einsturzende Neubauten • electronic mediaelectronic musicexhibition space • Institute for the Unstable Media • interactive installationsinteractive video • interdisciplinary workspace • international media laboratory • ISDN • Joke Brouwer • knowledge exchange • Laibach • machine art • manifesto • mixed media applications • multimedia centre • multimedia organisationNetherlands • network and communications media • new technical possibilitiesnew technology • pragmatic anarchists • public events • public spaceroboticsRotterdamSonic Youthsound installation • squatting • The building gave room for concerts and performances analogue media • unstable media • V2_virtual realityvisual arts • Vughterstraat 234 • world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2012

Marshall McLuhan debates his ideas on Australian TV in 1977

"In June 1977 Marshall McLuhan visited Australia and was a guest on Monday Conference, a popular live ABC television show hosted by Robert Moore. McLuhan debated his ideas with Moore and took questions from a feisty studio audience made up of members of the media and advertising industry, including TV boss Bruce Gyngell (see Part One at 14 mins), and young, funky Derryn Hinch (see Part Two from 3 mins).

McLuhan had been brought to Australia to address a broadcasting conference organised by Sydney radio station 2SM, and the Monday Conference was broadcast from the ballroom of the Sydney Hilton Hotel.

Many in the audience clearly admired McLuhan who has well into his prime and at ease with the live television situation. The discussion covered an eclectic range of topics, from television, privacy and Richard Nixon to holograms, transcendental meditation, Jane Austen, Euclidean geometry, denim jeans and nude streaking.

Towards the end of the program the always unpredictable McLuhan can be heard just off–mic, saying to Moore, 'I'm terribly sorry, but I'm going to have to sneak off and have a pee!'."

(ABC Radio National, Australia)

Fig.1,2&3 Marshall Mcluhan, lecture recorded by ABC Radio National Network on 27 June 1977 in Australia.

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TAGS

1977 • 2SM • ABC Radio National (Australia) • ABC Radio National Network • advertising industry • age of anxiety • age of electronic media • anxietyAustraliaAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBionic Woman • broadcasting conference • Bruce Gyngell • Canadiancommunicationcool mediumdebate • denim jeans • Derryn Hinchdigital eraelectronic mediaEuclidean geometryfolk artglobal villagehologram • hot medium • information anxietyinformation revolution • interconnectivity • InternetJane Austenlecture • live television • loss of privacy • Marshall McLuhanmass media age • McLuhan Project • media • media industry • media theory • media visionary • mediummedium is the messagemessage • Monday Conference (show) • networked societynostalgic yearning • nude streaking • privacyradio stationRichard Nixon • Robert Moore • studio audienceSydney • Sydney Hilton Hotel • television • The McLuhan Project • thinker • transcendental meditation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Ensemble Logic: early experiments writing for hypertext

"Essays, email, poetics, directions, maps, images. ensemble logic is a seriously beautiful series of fragments that together make an 'ensemble' arrangement that revels in the pleasure of reading and writing. The publication is a chance to consider how writing for an electronic environment translates into (back–to) the book. Each fragment is marked with a location guide that allows the reader to easily find the complete work on the CDROM included with the book and on the web. The CDROM archives the complete eWRe site up to July 2000."

Electronic Writing Research Ensemble (2000). Ensemble Logic. T. Hoskin and S. Rob. Adelaide, South Australia.

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TAGS

2000 • Anne Robertson • Anne Walton • Australia • Bill Seaman • CDROMdigital multimedia • Dylan Everett • electronic media • electronic Writing Research ensemble • ensemble arrangement • ensemble logic • eWRe • fragments • Gregory L. Ulmer • Heather Kerr • hyperfiction • hypernarrativehypertextinteractive narrative • Jessica Wallace • Joanne Harris • Josephine Wilson • Katie Moore • Linda Carroli • Linda Marie Walker • link • Mark Amerika • Mark Stephens • Michael Grimm • net.artnonlinearon the web • pleasure of reading and writing • publication • Simon Rob • Sonja Porcaro • Sue Thomas • Suzanne Treister • Teri Hoskin • translation • writing for an electronic environment • writing for hypertext

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2008

What is hypermedia?

"Hypermedia describes the new cultural and social forms emerging from the convergence of the media, telecommunications and computing. This convergence is driven by the adoption of digital technologies across these three sectors. The development of increasingly powerful personal computers is enabling the one–to–many broadcasting of the electronic media to be combined with the one–to–one interaction of the telephone. For the first time, people are able to participate within many–to–many forms of cultural and social communications. At present, hypermedia is being pioneered by companies, public institutions, community organisations and individuals using the internet and other forms of interactive media.

The process of development is advancing in two parallel ways. Firstly, hypermedia is being created which acts as a store of information to be accessed on request by individuals and a place where users can add their own material. This part of the development process involves the creation of digital versions of pre–existing types of cultural expression, such as text, graphics, audio and video. Secondly, the emergence of hypermedia leads to the invention of completely new cultural genres. For instance, using real–time conferencing programmes, people can enter into cyberspace to engage in direct communications with other users. This part of the development process involves the development of specifically new aesthetic practices, such as the design of virtual social spaces and the creation of interactive art installations.

In such instances, hypermedia is being developed to overcome the limitations of the existing mass media, such as their reliance on a homogenised and undifferentiated audience, and of the telephone, such as its lack of group interaction. As hypermedia is further developed, people will be increasingly able to select their own forms of cultural expression, distribute their own creations and exchange ideas directly with one another. While enjoying greater access to existing cultural forms, they will also be able to participate within the new forms of artistic and social expression. At the centre of this process will be skilled digital artisans who can pioneer the new hypermedia. This MA course is designed for the education of the innovators in the theory and practice of hypermedia."
(University of Westminster)

TAGS

convergencecultural forms • cultural genres • designdigital mediadigital technologieselectronic mediahypermedia • Hypermedia Research Centre • interactive mediaMAmultimedianarrative • social forms • UKUniversity of Westminster

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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