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Which clippings match 'Cultural Forms' keyword pg.1 of 3
13 OCTOBER 2017

Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

"Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy conducts an in-depth investigation into the long and complex evolution of style in the study of rhetoric and writing. The theories, research methods, and pedagogies covered here offer a conception of style as more than decoration or correctness—views that are still prevalent in many college settings as well as in public discourse. The book begins by tracing origins of style in sophistic-era Greece, moving from there to alternative and non-Western rhetorical traditions, showing style as always inventive and even at times subversive. Although devalued in subsequent periods, including the twentieth century, contemporary views now urge for renewed attention to the scholarly and pedagogical possibilities of style as experimentation and risk, rather than as safety and conformity. These contemporary views include work in areas of rhetoric and composition, such as basic writing, language difference, digital and multimodal discourse, feminist rhetorics, and rhetorical grammar. Later chapters in this book also explore a variety of disciplines and research methods—sociolinguistics and dialectology, literary and rhetorical stylistics, discourse and conversation analysis, and World Englishes. Finally, teachers and students will appreciate a final chapter that explains practical teaching methods, provides ideas for assignments and activities, and surveys textbooks that promote a rhetorical stance toward style."

(Brian Ray, 2015)

Ray, B. (2015). Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy, Parlor Press.


2015 • American stylistics • analysing style • basic writing • Brian Ray • Chris Holcomb • Classical rhetoric • composition analysis • content analysis • conversation analysis • cultural forms • dialectology • digital discourse • digital rhetoric • discourse analysis • discourse and conversation analysis • Elizabeth Closs Traugott • European stylistics • feminist rhetorics • Gayatri Spivak • genre analysis • H G Widdoseon • Jeanne Fahnestock • Jimmie Killingsworth • Judith Butler • language difference • language patterns • linguistic criticism • linguistics • literary and rhetorical stylistics • literature • Mary Louise Pratt • multimodal discourse • non-Western rhetorical traditions • Patricia Sullivan • patterns of language • Paul Butler • practical stylistics • public discourse • research methods • rhetoric analysis • rhetoric and writing • rhetorical analysis • rhetorical grammar • rhetorical stance • ritualisations of language • Roger Fowler • Ronald Carter • Sara Mill • social discourse • sociolinguistics • sociolinguists • sophistic-era Greece • stylistic analysis • stylistics • Susan Peck MacDonald • T R Johnson • Tara Lockhart • Terry Eagleton • thematic analysis • Tom Pace • Walter Nash • World Englishes


Simon Perkins
04 JANUARY 2013

What's the Value of Culture Today?

"Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the meaning and value of culture in the twenty–first century. In a programme recorded in front of an audience at Newcastle's Literary and Philosophical Society, Melvyn and the panel consider whether Matthew Arnold's assessment of culture as 'the great help out of our present difficulties' still has any relevance, almost 150 years after it was written."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 5 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Friday 04 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

Photo credit: J. Russell, Strobel Lab, Yale University 2009



21st century • assessment of culture • chimpanzeeChristopher Fraylingcommunity regenerationcreative industriescultural formscultural hegemony • culture today • culture war • Department of Science and Art • everyday practice • everything that is not nature • expertise • great help out of our present difficulties • high culturehuman activities • Literary and Philosophical Society • Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne • Matt Ridley • Matthew Arnold • meaning of culture • Melvyn Bragg • New Caledonian Crow • Newcastle • not nature • novelspanel discussionspopular culture • recorded in front of an audience • The Value of Culture (radio)Thomas Kuhn • Tiffany Jenkins • value of culture


Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2012

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Memory Board (Lukasa)

"Lukasa, or memory boards, are hand–held wooden objects that present a conceptual map of fundamental aspects of Luba culture. They are at once illustrations of the Luba political system, historical chronicles of the Luba state, and territorial diagrams of local chiefdoms. Each board's design is unique and represents the divine revelations of a spirit medium expressed in sculptural form. While many lukasa utilize a system of denotation based on masses of shells and beads affixed to their wooden surfaces, this example communicates its content through incised designs and images carved in relief."

(The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Fig.1 "Memory Board (Lukasa) [Democratic Republic of Congo; Luba] (1977.467.3)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.–of–art/1977.467.3 (October 2006).



19th century • ancestress • ancestry • arcane knowledge • art historybeads • carapace • carved relief • carvingchart • chevron • chief • chiefdom • circular elements • collectionconceptual mapconceptual metaphorcrocodilecultural formsculture • decipher and interpret • Democratic Republic of Congo • denote • diagram • divine revelations • facehand-heldHeilbrunn Timeline of Art Historyhistorical chronicleshistorical figuresillustrationinformation aestheticsinterdependenceinterpretation • kaloba • kikungulu • king • kitenta • Lolo Ina Nombe • Luba • lukasa • mbudye • memory • memory aid • memory board • Metropolitan Museum of Artmnemonicmotifmythologynotation • ovoid • physical geography • political organisation • political system • religious geography • representationsculptural formsculpturesymbolism • system of denotation • the spiritual world of ancestorstimeline • turtle • visual communicationvisualisationwood • wooden object • zoomorphic


Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Syllabus for Information Aesthetics at UIC School of Art and Design

"This studio course investigates the database as cultural form (Manovich, 2001), in the context of data visualization, digital fabrication, and computational aesthetics. Traditionally viewed as a tool for scientific reasoning and data exploration, information visualization has emerged as an artistic practice, propelled by the democratization of data sources and the advancement of computer graphics. The massive amount of data collected and disseminated online constitutes the basis for this course. Participants will be introduced to the basic skills for developing creative projects in two–, three–, and four dimensions, such as indexes, graphs, prints, digitally fabricated objects and maps. Students will also become familiar with the a basic vocabulary to co–create and collaborate with professionals in future contexts.

The course focuses on current standards for web development and mobile applications, including HTML5, CSS3, jQuery, PHP, MySQL, and Processing(.js). Fundamentals in XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and programming are beneficial, but not required. Throughout the course, students are asked to utilize the class blog to collect and share resources, collaboratively collecting interesting data sources towards a final project. A series of presentations, screenings, readings, and discussions will expose students to creative projects and artworks in the context of information visualization. Each student selects a research topic followed by an in–class research presentation (see schedule). Participants will also present their work during class critiques and interdisciplinary workshops to receive qualitative feedback from the instructor(s) and the class."

(Daniel Sauter, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Art and Design, Fall 2011)

Fig.1 Matt Wizinsky (2011). "Chicago unDensity", University of Illinois at Chicago.



2011 • cascading style sheets • Chicago • Chicago unDensity • class blog • class critiques • collaboration • collaboratively collecting • College of Architecture and the Arts • communication design educationcomputational aestheticscomputer graphics • course curriculum • creative projectsCSSCSS3cultural formscurriculum designdata • data exploration • data visualisationdatabase as cultural form • democratisation of data sources • design studiodigital fabrication • digitally fabricated objects • HTML5 • Illinois • information aestheticsinformation graphicsinformation visualisationinteractive tool • interdisciplinary workshops • jQueryLev Manovichmapmobile applicationsMySQLPHPProcessing (software)programming • qualitative feedback • research topicSchool of Art and Designstudio coursestudio programmesyllabus • tools for scientific reasoning • UIC • University of Illinois • University of Illinois at Chicago • visual vocabularyvisualisationweb developmentXHTML


Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2011

Stop funding Mickey Mouse degrees, says top scientist (a plea to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses)

"A leading scientist has attacked the government for funding students doing 'Mickey Mouse' degrees – and called for the money to be spent on science instead.

Dr Richard Pike, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry, said degrees in celebrity journalism, drama combined with waste management, and international football business management – all of which exist – should be 'kicked into touch'.

Funds for the courses should be channelled into science degrees and research. ...

Pike said degree courses should reflect the challenges the country will face in the future, rather than an 'ephemeral demand that in 10 years' time will be viewed as a curiosity'. ...

'Funding for the sciences should be ringfenced so that, in effect, it becomes a more dominant component. This is not a question of pleading a special case. Such a move is essential if we are all to enjoy the lifestyle we have become accustomed to, and ensure that we are prepared for the changes that will affect us all in the future.

'We need a population with an enduring set of skills, such as an understanding of the physical world around us, literacy and communication, numeracy, and how to function and continue to learn in a complex society.'"

(Jessica Shepherd, 10 February 2010,

[While Dr Richard Pike is making a noble effort –it is a vain one. His plea is a naive attempt to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses (Bernstein 2000, p.52) as they continue to undermine the authority of the strong classification principles (Bernstein 2000, p.99) of the traditional European Enlightenment university disciplinary model (Nussbaum 1997; Weeks and Glyer 1998). His comments fail to recognise dramatic global technological and sociological changes (Beck, Giddens et al. 1994) which have accelerated the pace of change and whose needs steadily diminish the relevance and potency of traditional scholarly insight.

Beck, U., A. Giddens, et al. (1994). Reflexive Modernization Politics Tradition and Aesthetics in the Modern Social Order. Stanford California, Stanford University Press.

Bernstein, B. (2000). Pedagogy Symbolic Control and Identity Theory Research Critique. Oxford, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. New York, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 15–16.

Nussbaum, M. (1997). Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press.

Weeks, D. L. and D. Glyer (1998). The Liberal Arts in Higher Education. Challenging Assumptions Exploring Possibilities. Lanham, Maryland, University Press of America.]



Alistair Darling • an enduring set of skills • celebrity journalism • classification principles • complex society • cultural forms • cuts and closures • disciplinary knowledgedisciplinary protectionismDrama with Waste ManagementEuropean Enlightenment • fundamental sciences • fundinghigher educationHigher Education Funding Council for England • international football business management • knowledge regionalisation • leading-edge work • Mickey Mousenumeracyphysical worldpublic money • put the genie back in the bottle • reflexive modernisationregionalisation of knowledge • regionalising discourses • research fundingRichard Pike • ringfencing • Royal Society of Chemistry • RSCscholarshipscience • traditional scholarly endeavour • university degrees • university disciplinary model • vertical discourses • waste management


Simon Perkins

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