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Which clippings match '1922' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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TAGS

1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2014

Diagram for the structure of teaching at the Bauhaus / Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus

"The individual elements of the Bauhaus teachings are inscribed in a circular shape. The areas of the preliminary course and building are conspicuously delineated from the core of the instruction–the workshops with their accompanying subjects–by a drawn double ring. This is due to the special position that both of these teaching areas occupied: In order to even be accepted to the study programme at the Bauhaus, it was necessary to successfully complete the preliminary course. And only the most talented students could qualify for participation in the building theory course. The schema also indicates the length of the respective educational units."

Fig.1 Walter Gropius, Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus, 1922, veröffentlicht in: Staatliches Bauhaus Weimar, 1919–1923 Bauhaus–Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin.

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1922apprenticeshipart and design educationatelier methodBauhaus DessauBauhaus SchoolBauhaus WeimarBauhaus-KolloquiumBerlin • circular disk • colour theorycourse modulescraft and designcurricula designcurriculumcurriculum designdesign and makingdesign curriculumdesign educationdesign formalismdesign school • design workshops • hierarchical model • learning and teachinglearning through practicematerial experimentationmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • Museum fur Gestaltung • programme modulesschema • Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus • Staatliches Bauhaus • studio approachstudio coursestudio practice • study programme • Walter Gropiusworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2012

Technological change: The last Kodak moment?

"LENIN is said to have sneered that a capitalist will sell you the rope to hang him. The quote may be spurious, but it contains a grain of truth. Capitalists quite often invent the technology that destroys their own business.

Eastman Kodak is a picture–perfect example. It built one of the first digital cameras in 1975. That technology, followed by the development of smartphones that double as cameras, has battered Kodak's old film– and camera–making business almost to death. ...

While Kodak suffers, its long–time rival Fujifilm is doing rather well. The two firms have much in common. Both enjoyed lucrative near–monopolies of their home markets: Kodak selling film in America, Fujifilm in Japan. A good deal of the trade friction during the 1990s between America and Japan sprang from Kodak's desire to keep cheap Japanese film off its patch.

Both firms saw their traditional business rendered obsolete. But whereas Kodak has so far failed to adapt adequately, Fujifilm has transformed itself into a solidly profitable business, with a market capitalisation, even after a rough year, of some $12.6 billion to Kodak's $220m. Why did these two firms fare so differently?

Both saw change coming. Larry Matteson, a former Kodak executive who now teaches at the University of Rochester's Simon School of Business, recalls writing a report in 1979 detailing, fairly accurately, how different parts of the market would switch from film to digital, starting with government reconnaissance, then professional photography and finally the mass market, all by 2010. He was only a few years out.

Fujifilm, too, saw omens of digital doom as early as the 1980s. It developed a three–pronged strategy: to squeeze as much money out of the film business as possible, to prepare for the switch to digital and to develop new business lines.

Both firms realised that digital photography itself would not be very profitable. 'Wise businesspeople concluded that it was best not to hurry to switch from making 70 cents on the dollar on film to maybe five cents at most in digital,' says Mr Matteson. But both firms had to adapt; Kodak was slower."

(The Economist, 14 January 2012)

Fig.1 John Terret (03 Nov 2011). "Kodak misses the moment", Al Jazeera.

Fig.2 Kodak (1922). "Kodachrome Film Test".

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19221975cameracamera-making businesscapitalismcolour • complacency • convergence • death knell • demise • digital cameradisruptive innovationEastman Kodak • film test • FujifilmJapanKodachrome • Kodachrome Film Test • KodakKodak Eastman • Kodak moment • market dominanceobsolescenceold media • picture-perfect • product designradical innovationsmartphonetechnological changetechnological innovationtechnologytechnology innovationVladimir Lenin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 DECEMBER 2008

Robert J. Flaherty: How I Filmed Nanook of the North

"New forms of travel film were coming out and the Johnson South Sea Island film particularly seemed to me to be an earnest of what might be done in the North. I began to believe that a good film depicting the Eskimo and his fight for existence in the dramatically barren North might be well worth while. To make a long story short, I decided to go north again– this time wholly for the purpose of making films."
(Robert J. Flaherty, 1922)

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1922Alaska Native peopleconstructed realitydiscoverydocu-dramadocumentary filmenvironment • Eskimo • ethnographic filmfilmfilm-maker • igloo • IndigenousInuit • Nanook of the North • naturepioneer • Robert J. Flaherty • spectacle • travel film • truth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2003

Robert Delaunay: Le Manege De Cochons (Carousel With Pigs)

This painting compresses pictorial and movement (space and time) information into a single frame.

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