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Which clippings match 'Citizen Journalism' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Mass Observation Archive: a UK social history writing project

"The Mass Observation Project (MOP) is a unique UK–based writing project which has been running since 1981. ... [it] differs from other similar social investigations because of its historical link to the original Mass Observation and because of its focus is on voluntary, self–motivated participation. It revives the early Mass Observation notion that everyone can participate in creating their own history or social science. The Mass Observers do not constitute a statistically representative sample of the population but can be seen as reporters or 'citizen journalists' who provide a window on their worlds.

The material is solicited in response to 'directives' or open–ended questions sent to them by post or email three times a year. The directives contain two or three broad themes which cover both very personal issues and wider political and social issues and events.

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TAGS

1937198120th century21st century • Charles Madge • citizen journalismconfessioncultural heritagediagramdiary • directives • drawingseventseveryday lifehistorical archiveshistorical chronicles • Humphrey Jennings • letterslistlongitudinal studymapMass Observation Project (MOP)material culture • memoir • open-ended questionsopinion • ordinary people • personal experiencephotographsplacespolitical issuesposterity • press cutting • qualitative researchresearch resourcesself knowledge • self-identity • self-revelationsocial historysocial issuessocial researchstatistically representative samplestoriessubjectivitytheir storiesthematic patterns • Tom Harrisson • UK • University of Sussex • voluntary participationwriting project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2012

Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa: Call For Papers

"Call For Papers: 2nd International Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium, #MINA2012, Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa, 23rd –25th November 2012, Massey University, Wellington, NZ ...

MINA [www.mina.pro] is an international network that promotes cultural and research activities to expand the emerging possibilities of mobile media. MINA aims to explore the opportunities for interaction between people, content and the creative industry within the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand and internationally.

The symposium will provide a platform for filmmakers, artists, designers, researchers, 'pro–d–users' and industry professionals to debate the prospect of wireless, mobile and ubiquitous technologies in art and design environments and the creative industries. MINA invites paper proposals relating (but not limited) to; mobile lens media, iPhoneography, mobile video production, mobile–mentaries (mobile documentaries), mobile network and transmedia, mobile communities, mobile media and social change, mobile visual arts, mobile locative media, citizen journalism, mobile visual literacy, mobile media in education and mobile technologies and civic media. ...

Paper proposals should be submitted by the 15th August 2012"

(Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa)

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TAGS

2012Aotearoa New Zealandcall for paperscitizen journalism • civic media • co-creationco-creator-shipcollaborationcommunication devicecontemporary art practicescontemporary designcontent creationcreative industriescrowdsourcing • cultural research • design industrydesign professionalsdesign researcherfilmmaking • independent creatives • industry professionals • innovative business models • International Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposiuminternational networkiPhone cinematographyiPhoneographylocative mediam-learningMassey University • media content • media distributionmediascapeMINAMINA2012mobile apps • mobile communities • mobile documentary • Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa • mobile lens media • mobile mediamobile media in educationmobile media practicesmobile networkmobile phone • mobile phone users • mobile technologiesmobile video production • mobile visual arts • mobile visual literacy • mobile-mentary • modes of communicationmodes of production • new forms of connectivity • new forms of sociability • new media aesthetics • new media formats • paper proposals • participatory culturepro-d-userspro-sumerprodusersocial changesymposiumtransdisciplinaritytransmediaubiquitous technologiesvisual communication designwireless technologies

CONTRIBUTOR

Lynne Ciochetto
20 APRIL 2012

The amateur video which sparked the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest

"in March 1991, television screens across the world broadcast [George Holliday's] videotaped footage of LAPD officers raining down 56 baton blows on an African American named Rodney King. ... on April 29, 1992, a jury in Simi Valley, one of the whitest exurbs of Los Angeles, acquitted three of the four officers involved in beating Rodney King. The response in South Los Angeles was loud and immediate: That night, thousands of residents, black and Latino, took to the streets, starting a four–day riot that destroyed more than 1,000 buildings, injured 2,500 people, killed 58, and resulted in $1 billion in damage and 16,000 arrests."

(Josh Sides, 19/04/2012, Design Observer)

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TAGS

19911992 • 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest • acquitted • African Americanamateuramateur cameraamateur videoarsonassault • baton • beating • brutalitybystandercitiescitizen journalismcivic engagementcivil disobediencecivil libertiescivil rights • civil unrest • damageethics • exurb • eyewitnessforce of law • George Holliday • high-speed pursuit • Hispanic • injusticejustice • LAPD • Latasha Harlins • Latino • looting • Los Angeles • Los Angeles Police Department • Los Angeles Riots • manslaughter • motoristmurderpolicepolice brutality • police officer • povertypower corrupts • property damages • real behaviourriot • rioted • riots • Rodney King • self-control • Simi Valley • social differentiationsocial responsibility • South Central Riots • suffering injustice • television report • unethical behaviourunjustunjust powervideotapedvideotaped footage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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TAGS

adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2009

Twitter switch for Guardian, after 188 years of ink

"the Guardian today announces that it will become the first newspaper in the world to be published exclusively via Twitter, the sensationally popular social networking service that has transformed online communication.

The move, described as 'epochal' by media commentators, will see all Guardian content tailored to fit the format of Twitter's brief text messages, known as 'tweets', which are limited to 140 characters each.
...
At a time of unprecedented challenge for all print media, many publications have rushed to embrace social networking technologies. Most now offer Twitter feeds of major breaking news headlines, while the Daily Mail recently pioneered an iPhone application providing users with a one–click facility for reporting suspicious behaviour by migrants or gays. 'In the new media environment, readers want short and punchy coverage, while the interactive possibilities of Twitter promise to transform th,' the online media guru Jeff Jarvis said in a tweet yesterday, before reaching his 140–character limit, which includes spaces. According to subsequent reports, he is thinking about going to the theatre tonight, but it is raining :(.

A unique collaboration between The Guardian and Twitter will also see the launch of Gutter, an experimental service designed to filter noteworthy liberal opinion from the cacophony of Twitter updates. Gutter members will be able to use the service to comment on liberal blogs around the web via a new tool, specially developed with the blogging platform WordPress, entitled GutterPress."
(Rio Palof, 1 April 2009, The Guardian, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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