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23 MARCH 2014

Bot & Dolly and the Rise of Creative Robots

"This is Bot & Dolly, a boutique design studio that specializes in combining massive mechanical arms with custom software for movies, architecture, digital fabrication, and entertainment installations. 'We're a culture of makers, of creators with open minds,' says Tobias Kinnebrew, Bot & Dolly's director for product strategy. 'We work on things that don't seem possible and try to make them possible.'

One of Bot & Dolly's first clients, Google (GOOG), bought into that vision quite literally. In 2012 it commissioned Bot & Dolly to create an attention–grabbing experience to promote its Nexus Q media–streaming device at the Google I/O conference. Bot & Dolly built an 8–foot–across, 300–pound Nexus Q mounted on a robot arm that passersby controlled via several Nexus gadgets working in tandem. ...

Bot & Dolly was started four years ago by Jeff Linnell and Randy Stowell, as a side project at their video production company, Autofuss. (The cafe at the front of their building, called Front, is the pair's latest joint endeavor.) Still operating independently with around 20 full–timers, Bot & Dolly is best known for bringing weightlessness to the big screen for last year's Oscar–winning film Gravity."

(David Pescovitz, 20 March 2014, Bloomberg Businessweek)

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2012 • animation in real space • attention-grabbing experience • augmented spaceblack and whiteBloomberg Businessweek • Bot and Dolly • boutique design studio • boxcommissioncreatorscustom softwaredesign studio • entertainment installation • Google (GOOG)Google I/OGravity (2013) • Jeff Linnell • makers • mechanical arm • media-streaming device • Nexus Q • projection mapping • Randy Stowell • robot arm • robotic projectorsrobotic systemsrobotic technology • video production company • video projection worksvisual spectacle • weightlessness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2012

UK Artist Opportunities through Jerwood Makers Open 2013

"Jerwood Makers Open is designed to commission and showcase new work by emerging artists working in the applied arts. Five commissions of £7,500 will be awarded to artists to create new work, to be exhibited as part of the JVA programme at Jerwood Space, London and on tour nationally. Artists will be chosen by an independent selection panel and must be UK resident and within 10 years of graduating or setting up their practice.

BACKGROUND: Launched in 2010, Jerwood Makers Open has been developed to create a space in which to recognise and celebrate the significance of making practice and process within the contemporary visual arts. This initiative offers makers at the early stages of their careers an opportunity to develop their creative ideas independently of specific commissioning structures by submitting a proposal for new work. It totals an investment of £37,500 in new applied arts commissions.

Jerwood Visual Arts, developed and managed by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation, is committed to supporting and showcasing contemporary applied arts practice. The Jerwood Applied Arts Prize ran for 11 years (1999–2007) in partnership with the Crafts Council. This was followed from 2008 to 2010 by Jerwood Contemporary Makers, a nominated exhibition series which provided a platform to show new and emergent work in the field of making."

(Jerwood Visual Arts, UK)

Fig.1 Glithero, Burn Burn Burn (after) [http://www.glithero.com/contact–us].

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2013 • applied art • applied arts • artist opportunities • artists • arts prize • burningcommissioncommissioning • contemporary applied arts • contemporary applied practice • contemporary visual artscreative ideasearly career • emergent work • emerging artistsJerwood Charitable Foundation • Jerwood Contemporary Makers • Jerwood Makers Open • Jerwood Space • Jerwood Visual Arts • JVA • Londonmakers • making practice • new work • UK • UK Crafts Council • visual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2008

The advent of multiplatform means commissioning is rarely just about TV

"Broadcasters looking to engage with today's audiences have many platforms to choose from, but making them work means playing to the strengths of each without tainting a programme's brand values.
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Mike Flood Page, Illumina Digital editorial director, says that while broadcasters are receptive to ideas, there have been few success stories so far. He says: 'Everyone agrees 360–degree commissioning is a wonderful idea but a lot of these ideas are still trying to get off the ground. You could count the successes on the fingers of one mutilated hand. But everybody's learning how to make it work and is experimenting."

(Robin Parker, 17 September 2007)

TAGS

360-degree Television • audiencebroadcastcommission • digital interactive television • digital mediaformatinnovationinteractive mediamediamediummultimediamultiplatformplatform • red button content • televisiontelevision programmingTV

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2004

Sutherland's notoriously disliked painting of Winston Churchill

"Sutherland was commissioned by both Houses of Parliament to paint a full–length portrait of Churchill in 1954, for which this is a study. The finished painting was presented to Churchill. It was destroyed by his wife Clementine.

...The destruction of Sutherland's painting is one of the most notorious cases of a subject disliking their portrait. This painted sketch of Churchill's head, a study for the lost, full–length painting, suggests why. It's not simply that Sutherland's modernist tendencies irked the conservative tastes of the Sunday painter prime minister. This is a very unhappy painting. Old, grumpy, with an anger that no longer seems leavened by the humour and verbal creativity of the Churchill of legend, this is a reactionary curmudgeon surrounded by the shades of night.

The painting is black and rough, as if burnt, as if Churchill were emerging from the ruins of Europe, from a world not saved but shattered. The man himself still has a stoic authority; he might be the ancient Roman Cicero waiting to be murdered. There's a sculpted quality to his sturdy bald head that reminds you of Roman busts. There's also a sadness and sense of defeat, rather than the assertion of indomitability in the Churchill statue outside the Houses of Parliament. This is a man alone, in the real wilderness years."

(Jonathan Jones, 3 November 2001, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Winston Churchill, by Graham Vivian Sutherland, pencil and wash, circa 1954, 22 1/2 in. x 17 3/8 in. (570 mm x 440 mm), Purchased, 1990, NPG 6096, National Portrait Gallery, London.
Fig.2 Churchill in 1954 – portrait by Graham Sutherland (imperfect reproduction).

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1874 • 1954196520th century • also-ran • Boer warBritish art • Clementine Churchill • cold warcommissionconservativedestruction • dwindling health • emerging from the ruins • extraordinary achievements • figuration • finest hour • Francis Bacon • Graham Sutherland • home secretary • Houses of Parliament • indomitability • iron curtain • legendliberal • man alone • National Portrait Gallery • neo-romantic painter • Nobel Prizenotorious • painted sketch • paintingpopularityportraitportraiturePrime Minister • reactionary curmudgeon • Roman Cicero • romanticismsadnessSecond World War • sense of defeat • shattered • Sir Winston Spencer Churchill • stoic • striking miners • sunday painter • The Guardian • The Second World War • warwar correspondent • war leader • wartime prime minister • wilderness years • Winston ChurchillWorld War II
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