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Which clippings match 'IPhone' keyword pg.1 of 7
01 JANUARY 2014

Tinder: swiping yes to intimate invitations from relative strangers

"Tinder uses your existing social networking data from Facebook to locate people in the immediate vicinity, tell you a bit about them, whether you have any friends in common and (most importantly) show you a pic.

It has slimmed down the emotional, cognitive and financial investment required by the virtual dating process to one simple question: 'Do I want to do you?' What more modern way to make that most basic binary decision of whether you want to shag someone than a game of real–world 'Hot or Not'?

Social media has made us expert first–daters, well–versed in smalltalk and over–sharing with strangers. The quick follow–though from swipe to sex is similarly instinctive for a generation with an appetite for immediacy."

(Caroline Kent, 19 Sep 2013)

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automatic predictions • binary decision • casual sexcommodifying myselfcomparison site • compass • cross-context sharingdatadata matchingdatingFacebook • friends in common • hot or not • identity performance • immediate vicinity • iPhonelikedlikeslocation-basedlocation-based social networkingmobile appnormalising over-sharingonline datingonline profilesoversharingpersonal brandingproximityrecommendation platformself-disclosure • shag • shared friends • small talksocial mediasocial networkingspectacular societyswipingTinder (app)user data • vicinity • virtual dating

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 DECEMBER 2013

Kirby Ferguson: Embracing the remix

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2012Android OSAppleauthorship • behavioural finance theory • Bill BuxtonBob Dylan • borrow • Brian Burton • building on the work of others • Carter Family • celebrated creators • citation as a form of persuasioncopycopyingcopyrightcopyright law • core technology • creative workscreativitycultural productiondesign innovation • Dominic Behan • everything is a remix • good artists copy great artists steal • graphical user interfacegreat ideasHenry FordiPhone • Jean Ritchie • Jeff Han • Kirby Ferguson • loss aversion • multi-fingered gestures • multi-touch technologiesnew medianothing is original • Nottamun Town • originalityoriginality is non-existentownershipPablo Picasso • patent law • patent registration • Paul Clayton • private property • property analogy • remixremix cultureremixingrip • shameless stealing • standing on the shoulders of giants • stealing • Steve Jobs • stolen product • TED Talks • Woody Guthrie • Xerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2013

Overt technological change witnesses an enduring tradition

"In 2005, visitors packed into the expansive boulevard leading up to St. Peter's Square as Pope John Paul II's body was carried into the crowd for public viewing in the days following his death. Taken nearly two years before the iPhone debuted, the photo is striking now for its appearance straight out of another era.

For anyone who has ever been to a concert, the photo at bottom, taken Tuesday night as Pope Francis made his inaugural appearance on the Vatican balcony, seems almost ordinary. The two, taken together, reflect a world changing, even as some ancient traditions stay the same."

(Carlo Dellaverson, 13 March 2013, NBC News)

Fig.1 Luca Bruno / AP, The faithful gather in 2005 near St. Peter's to witness Pope John Paul II's body being carried into the Basilica for public viewing.

Fig.2 Michael Sohn / AP, St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on March 13, 2013.

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20052013ancient traditions • another era • ArgentinacacophonyCatholic • Catholic leader • changing behaviourschanging timeschanging worldChristian • concert • digital ageelectronic ageinaugural addressiPhone • Jorge Mario Bergoglio • mobile phone • NBC News • participative mediaphotoPopePope Francis • Pope John Paul II • ritual • St Peters Square • symbolic behaviourtradition • Vatican City • visitors

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2013

Media technology convergence: from Desktop to mobile

"When that Apple II came out, it really could do nothing. It could show text and after we waited a bit, we had these things called images. Remember when images were first possible with a computer, those gorgeous, full–color images? And then after a few years, we got CD–quality sound. It was incredible. You could listen to sound on the computer. And then movies, via CD–ROM. It was amazing. Remember that excitement? And then the browser appeared. The browser was great, but the browser was very primitive, very narrow bandwidth. Text first, then images, we waited, CD–quality sound over the Net, then movies over the Internet. Kind of incredible. And then the mobile phone occurred, text, images, audio, video. And now we have iPhone, iPad, Android, with text, video, audio, etc. You see this little pattern here? We're kind of stuck in a loop"

(John Maeda, TEDGlobal 2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Alise Piebalga
27 NOVEMBER 2012

U+MAG: an independent Brazilian digital magazine

"In some religions, one must be baptized in water for a new, sinless person to emerge. Maybe that can unfold, in different ways, for a magazine like U+MAG, which is created from scratch every three months, sinless and clean – as I've said in past issues. And in life, it's sometimes crucial to be born again, everyday. But there is a baptism inside this edition, and it happened through images by Lucas Bori and Fernando Mazza. They are responsible (together with Cassia Tabatini, Daniel Malva, Tiago Chediak and Hugo Toni) for the pictures that act as breathers within this issue, which marks a transition to a new phase for the magazine. It is now divided between online (exclusive stories regularly posted on our website), mobile (iPad, iPhone and Android) and print (print on demand is the future!). This issue of U+MAG is special for another reason: it's our anniversary edition (but without golden, celebratory caps) and also because it celebrates in an unconventional way and running from stereotypes what an emerging nation can show the world. In this issue's opening pages, Bruno Munari's quote is the perfect translation for what we want to convey. Things that make our lives interesting. It's not as if the magazine has a message such as 'Yes, we have Bananas, and they are the world's best'. It's much more than that: we present Brazilian imagery outside of the tourist package that's usually spread around, specially when the country concerned is about to host a World Cup and the Olympics. But we treat it all ironically (e.g. the story shot by Vitor Pickersgill, inspired by the carioca piriguetes, a term for local, shamelessly clad girls) and poetically (such as the Iemanja 2.0, beautifully impersonated by Thais Custodio). If we focused the whole issue on Brazil, however, we would be closing ourselves to the world. And it goes against our principles. That's why the stories shot by our foreign collaborators are indispensable for U+MAG's universe. They are essential for our formula to work out. Our exaggerated, bold and visually ever changing spirit will remain intact. The covers, on the other hand, will suffer a redesign in 2013. A preview of that process is the cover of our special collector's issue–all to value photography and imagery. Besides, fresh air is always appreciated. A special thanks for all who were part of U+MAG's history so far, and hello for all newcomers, who believe in our work and our philosophy."

(U+MAG, 2012)

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2004 • a transition to a new phase • acid-free paper • Android OS • anniversary edition • bold • BrazilBrazilian • Brazilian imagery • Bruno Munari • carioca piriguetes • content formcreative people • digital magazine • emerging nation • exaggerated • exclusive online content • FIFA World Cup • HP Indigo digital press • independent publishersiPadiPhonemagazine • MagCloud • make our lives interesting • Olympicsprint on demandredesign • Rio 2016 • rising talents • stereotypes • tourist destination • U+MAG • verified recycled sources • visual communication • visual intact • web magazine • whats happening • whats next • whats past

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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