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Which clippings match 'Graphic Designer' keyword pg.1 of 5
12 MARCH 2015

Hugh Dubberly: Design the Future

"Hugh is the President of Dubberly Design and talented design planner and teacher. At Apple Computer in the late 80s and early 90s, Hugh managed cross-functional design teams and later managed creative services for the entire company. While at Apple, he co-created a technology-forecast film called 'Knowledge Navigator,' that presaged the appearance of the Internet in a portable digital device. While at Apple, he served at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena as the first and founding chairman of the computer graphics department.

Intrigued by what the publishing industry would look like on the Internet, he next became Director of Interface Design for Times Mirror. This led him to Netscape where he became Vice President of Design and managed groups responsible for the design, engineering, and production of Netscape's Web portal. Hugh graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in graphic design and earned an MFA in graphic design from Yale.

This lecture was held on Wednesday, October 3, 2012 at 4:30pm in 1305 Newell Simon Hall."

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2012 • age of biology • Apple Computer • Art Center College of Design in Pasadena • Austin Henderson • biological model • boundary objectsCarnegie Mellon Universitycommunication systemsconcept map • concept mapping • conceptual model • continuous change • creative servicescross-functional design teamsdata modelling • data models • design of the system rather than the object • design planner • design the futureDesign the Future Lecture ProgrammeDonald Norman • Dubberly Design • Fred Murrell • George Lakoffgraphic designer • HCII • Hugh Dubberlyinterface design • James Griesemer • Jay Doblin • John Rheinfrank • Kevin KellyKnowledge Navigator (1988)lingua franca • manufacturing age • mechanistic modelmetaphors of realityNetscape • networked-services ecology • org chart • Pasadena • portable digital device • Rhode Island School of Designservice design • service designer • Susan Leigh Star • system image • technology forecasting • Times Mirror • VisiCalc • whole systems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2014

Irving Harper: The Mediums Beyond the Message

"Imagining a sheet of paper as building site will give you a good sense for Irving Harper's approach to graphic design. As the Swiss magazine Graphis noted in a 1953 survey of his print work for the Nelson Office, it's an approach not dissimilar to that of an architect. 'The page on which to print is regarded as a site on which to build... Pictorial material, often broken into fragments, is organized by asymmetrical harmonies.' From his start working with Nelson in 1947 through his tenure as design director at the office until 1963, Harper brought a visual coherence and energy to everything he created–from furniture, to ads, to clocks–but it's in the printed collateral that his approach to design as a total experience is most easily gleaned. Be it evoking three–dimensional spatial gestures into a two–dimensional magazine spread, for example, or turning a functional object like a clock into a graphic abstraction, or giving a simple typographic treatment the textural quality of a swath of fabric, everything he designs has a deeper sense of dimension."

(Amber Bravo, Herman Miller Inc., 2014)

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20th century3D designchair • compositional predilections • designer • functional object • furniture design • furniture designer • George Nelson • graphic abstraction • graphic designgraphic designer • Herman Miller • Irving Harper • magazine advertisement • magazine spread • Nelson Office • total design • visual coherence

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Josef Muller-Brockmann: the grid system and the golden ratio

"Muller Brockmann published several books, including The Graphic Artist and His Problems and Grid Systems in Graphic Design. These books provide an in–depth analysis of his work practices and philosophies, and provide an excellent foundation for young graphic designers wishing to learn more about the profession."

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Bauhaus Schoolclear communicationconsistencyDe Stijldesign formalismdesign principlesgolden ratiographic designergrid systemInternational StyleJosef Muller-Brockmannposter design • quantities • Russian constructivismSuprematism • Swiss International Style • Swiss Style • typographic consistency • University and Kunstgewerbeschule • visual communication • visual consistency • visual designvisual hierarchyvisual simplicitywhitespace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2013

Will Burtin: pioneer information designer

"Will Burtin, was one of the foremost information designers of the 20th century. Will Burtin was born in Germany and trained as a typographer and designer at the Werkschule Cologne, Germany, where he also later taught. Shortly after emigrating to the United States in 1938, he was commissioned to create exhibition units for the Federal Pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. From 1943 to 1945, Burtin worked for the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1945, Burtin became art director for Fortune magazine. Later, in 1949, Burtin established his own design firm in New York with clients including Union Carbide, Eastman Kodak, the Smithsonian Institution, and Upjohn Pharmaceuticals. In 1971, Burtin received a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Graphic Arts."

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20th centuryAmerican Institute of Graphic ArtsColognecommunication design • communication designer • design firm • Eastman Kodak • Federal Pavilion at the • Fortune magazinegraphic designgraphic designerinfluential designerinformation designinformation designerinformation graphics • Kolner Werkschulen • layered • New York Worlds Fair 1939 • Print (magazine) • RIT Graphic Design ArchiveRochester Institute of Technology • Scope (magazine) • Smithsonian Institutetypographer • Union Carbide • Upjohn Pharmaceuticals • US Army Air Corps • visual communicationWill Burtin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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