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01 NOVEMBER 2015

Brett Leavy: The Virtual Meanjin Project

"Brett Leavy is an immersive heritage specialist, virtual historian and artist. His innovative idea to recreate the real environment for mapping Indigenous culture and heritage stems from his passion to educate the community about Indigenous history."

(ABC Open)

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TAGS

ABC Open • arts and cultural practices • Australian Indigenous communities • Brett Leavycultural heritagecultural identitycultural spacesculture and customs • culture and heritage • First Nationsfloraflora and faunafood gathering activities • guesstimation • historical recreation • Human Ventures • immersive gaming • immersive heritage • immersive heritage experienceIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous communitiesIndigenous cultural knowledge • Indigenous culture • Indigenous heritageindigenous history • Indigenous stories • interactive immersive simulation experience • Jagera people • social enterprise • Turrabull people • virtual environmentvirtual heritage • virtual heritage environments • virtual historian • Virtual Meanjin • virtual recreationvirtual time machineVirtual Warrane ll

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2012

Virtual Warrane: An Aboriginal contribution to the vision

"Aboriginal multimedia expert Brett Leavy is exhibiting realistic simulations of Sydney Cove and Circular Quay before the arrival of colonial settlers in the late 18th century.

Using Unity (beta) game engine software, he and a team of modellers, photographers and sound artists have set up at Sydney's colonial-era Customs House a wall of media screens and a video gaming room to educate visitors about the early vegetation, wildlife, fishing and culture of the original residents of what is now the Sydney business district. (Ghostly wireframes of some of the current CBD towers, and the Sydney Opera House, can be navigated as an overlay to the underlying environmental simulation.)"

(Davina Jackson, 8 August 2012, Virtual ANZ)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2009

Rome Reborn 2.0

"Rome Reborn is an international initiative whose goal is the creation of 3D digital models illustrating the urban development of ancient Rome from the first settlement in the late Bronze Age (ca. 1000 B.C.) to the depopulation of the city in the early Middle Ages (ca. A.D. 550). With the advice of an international Scientific Advisory Committee, the leaders of the project decided that A.D. 320 was the best moment in time to begin the work of modelling.
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The primary purpose of this phase of the project was to spatialize and present information and theories about how the city looked at this moment in time, which was more or less the height of its development as the capital of the Roman Empire. A secondary, but important, goal was to create the cyberinfrastructure whereby the model could be updated, corrected, and augmented. Spatialization and presentation involve two related forms of communication: (1) the knowledge we have about the city has been used to reconstruct digitally how its topography, urban infrastructure (streets, bridges, aqueducts, walls, etc.), and individual buildings and monuments might have looked; and (2) whenever possible, the sources of archaeological information or speculative reasoning behind the digital reconstructions, as well as valuable online resources for understanding the sites of ancient Rome, have been made available to users. The model is thus a representation of the state of our knowledge (and, implicitly, of our ignorance) about the urban topography of ancient Rome at various periods of time. Beyond this primary use, the model can function in other ways. It can be used to teach students or the general public about how the city looked; it can be used to gather data not otherwise available, such as the alignment of built features in the city with respect to each other or to natural features and phenomena; and, it can be used to run urban or architectural experiments not otherwise possible, such as how well the city or the buildings within it functioned in terms of heating and ventilation, illumination, circulation of people, etc. Finally, a digital model can be easily updated to reflect corrections to the model or new archaeological discoveries."

(Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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