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Which clippings match 'San Francisco' keyword pg.1 of 3
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2013

Let's not let new technology change our profession or our industry...

"This newscast from KRON in San Francisco in 1981 has been making the rounds recently. It's labeled 'primitive Internet report,' but what it presents is actually one example of the many pre–Internet efforts that the newspaper industry made to try to plan for an online future – and stake out its own turf in that forthcoming world. ...

In the video, you can hear [Dave] Cole say, of the 'Electronic Examiner' he was demonstrating, 'We're not in it to make money.' At the end, the announcer points out that an entire edition of the paper takes two hours to download, at a $5/hour cost – making this 'telepaper' little competition for the paper edition. 'For the moment at least,' the reporter declares, over the image of a sidewalk news vendor hawking the afternoon edition, 'this fellow isn't worried about being out of a job.'

Though the piece does say that 'Engineers now predict the day will come when we get all our newspapers and magazines by home computer,' its underlying message is – Don't worry. This crazy computer stuff isn't going to change anything much for now. And indeed it took 10 years for any sort of online service to become even remotely popular. Almost 30 years later, newspapers are still in business; some are even still sold by guys on sidewalks. It has taken this long for the technology to transform the newspaper biz in a big way. ...

But even as the downloads sped up and the connect–time costs dropped, the industry held onto that approach, instead of coming to grips with the fundamentally different dynamics of a new communications medium. What had made sense in the early days over time became a crippling set of blinders. The spirit of experimentation that the Examiner set out with in 1981 dried up, replaced by an industry–wide allergy to fundamental change.

'Let's use the new technology,' editors and executives would say, 'but let's not let the technology change our profession or our industry.' They largely succeeded in resisting change. Now it's catching up with them."

(Scott Rosenberg, 29 January 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2013

Minerva Project: seeks to satisfy global demand for an elite education

"Elite American universities maintain their prestige by turning away a huge percentage of applicants every year. And the education entrepreneur Ben Nelson sees an opportunity in this demand for top–flight education: He wants to reach talented students across the world and to build a new university that could remake the image of Ivy League education.

Mr. Nelson, founder of a start–up called the Minerva Project, believes the minuscule acceptance rates at prestigious institutions leave some college–bound students without a place where they can pursue a blue–ribbon degree. So his for–profit enterprise seeks to satisfy that demand by offering a rigorous online education to the brightest students around the world who slip through the cracks of highly selective admissions cycles. ...

To create these advanced courses, Minerva will break down the role of professor into two distinct jobs instead of simply poaching faculty members from other universities. The company will award monetary prizes to 'distinguished teachers among great research faculty,' Mr. Nelson said, who will team up with crews to videotape lectures and craft innovative courses when they are not teaching at their home institutions. (Mr. Nelson declined to elaborate on the size of the prizes.)

Minerva will then hire a second group of instructors to deliver the material. Mr. Nelson called them 'preceptors,' who will typically be young graduates of doctoral programs–they will lead class discussions online, hold office hours, and grade assignments."

(Nick DeSantis, 3 April 2012, The Chronicle of Higher Education)

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2014 • admissions cycles • applied knowledge • Ben Nelson • Benchmark Capital • Bob Kerrey • cheaper tuition • disruptive innovation • education entrepreneur • elite education • elite universities • for-profit enterprise • higher education • Innosight Institute • international studentsIvy League • launching a new brand • Lawrence Summers • Minerva Projectnew universityonline education • preceptors • prestige • prestigious institutions • research faculty • San Francisco • seed-stage investment • seeking accreditation • start-uptechnology transforming learning • The Chronicle of Higher Education • top-tier institutions • university admissions • videotape lectures • wired campus

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2012

Small business marketing: tweeting globally, accessed locally

"SAN FRANCISCO – Three weeks after Curtis Kimball opened his crème brûlée cart in San Francisco, he noticed a stranger among the friends in line for his desserts. How had the man discovered the cart? He had read about it on Twitter.

For Mr. Kimball, who conceded that he 'hadn't really understood the purpose of Twitter,' the beauty of digital word–of–mouth marketing was immediately clear. He signed up for an account and has more than 5,400 followers who wait for him to post the current location of his itinerant cart and list the flavors of the day, like lavender and orange creamsicle.

'I would love to say that I just had a really good idea and strategy, but Twitter has been pretty essential to my success,' he said. He has quit his day job as a carpenter to keep up with the demand.

Much has been made of how big companies like Dell, Starbucks and Comcast use Twitter to promote their products and answer customers' questions. But today, small businesses outnumber the big ones on the free microblogging service, and in many ways, Twitter is an even more useful tool for them."

(Claire Cain Miller, 22 July 2009, New York Times)

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ad budget • advertising and marketing • advertising strategy • being discovered • big companies • cart • Coca-Cola • Comcast • creme brulee cart • current location • Curtis Kimball • customers • Dell • desserts • digital word-of-mouth marketing • e-commerce business • fresh • itinerant cart • little-bitty store • little-bitty town • local businesslocal businesseslocalisationMcDonaldsmicroblogging • mom-and-pop shops • multiplatform marketers • New York Times • promote products • San Franciscoshopping behavioursmall businesssmall businesses • small-business owners • social mediaStarbucks • supersmall businesses • sushi restaurant • tactical engagementTweetDeckTwitter • Twitter followers • Twitter localisation • Umi (restaurant) • word of mouth • word-of-mouth • word-of-mouth promotion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2012

Rob Nilsson: indie filmmaker and small format video feature pioneer

"Rob Nilsson pioneered small analog and digital formats and created a low–budget cinematic style called direct action. He established the Tenderloin Action Group (now called the Tenderloin yGroup) in 1990, a drama workshop for homeless people, inner–city San Francisco residents and professional actors. He was the first video maker to blow up small–format video to 35 mm film for international theatrical distribution. His work has screened at festivals in the United States and abroad, including Mill Valley, Toronto, Santa Barbara, San Francisco and Locarno. Nilsson's work has been honored with numerous awards, including the Camera d'Or at Cannes and the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival (he was the first American Director to win both)."

(Media Arts Fellow)

Fig.1 scene from Rob Nilsson (1987). "Heat and Sunlight", Betacam SP to 35mm film transfer.

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198535mmAmerican directoranalogueanalogue and digital formatsavailable lightBetacam SPblack and white • blow up small-format video • Chikara Motomura • cinema of the street • cinematic style • citizen cinema (ethos) • convergence • direct action (ethos) • Dogme 95film actingfilmmakerfly-on-the-wallindependent cinemaindependent filmindie cinemainfluential directorlow budgetlow lightlow-budgetlow-budget film • Media Arts Fellow • Michael Edo Keane • new technical possibilitiesrealism • Rob Nilsson • San Francisco • Signal 7 (film) • small format video feature • tape to film transfer • Tenderloin Action Group • Tenderloin yGroup • underground cinema • video to film transfer • videomaker

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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