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Which clippings match 'Prank' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JUNE 2013

Photobombing: foregrounding the constructed reality of photographic scenes

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TAGS

breaking the fourth wallconstructed reality • diminish • distracting attentiondistracting behaviourdistraction • divert attention • extradiegeticfocus • foregrounding constructedness • grab our attentionhuman behaviourhumourintertextuality • non-diegetic • out of the spotlight • photobomb • photobombing • photographic portraitplayfulnessprankreflexive foregroundingreflexivitysnapshotssurprise • the space of the photograph • trivialisationundermine • upstage • upstagingworld of the image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2012

Die Antwoord: a provocative celebration of otherness

"If Die Antwoord are a joke, they're a painfully acute one. This over–the–top South African rap–rave trio, comprising rappers Ninja and Yolandi Visser and a hulking DJ called Hi–Tek, purport to represent 'zef', a strain of working–class/underclass Boer' culture that perhaps most closely equates to our own pejorative term 'chav'.

The band's co–founder and frontman, Watkin Tudor Jones, aka Ninja, has previously appeared in a host of similar conceptual art–rap projects and situationist pranks."

(Ian Gittins, 16 November 2010)

Fig.1 Die Antwoord "Zef Side"

Fig.2 Die Antwoord "I Fink U Freeky", Directed by Roger Ballen & NINJA, Director of Photography Melle Van Essen, Edited by Jannie Hondekom @ Left, Post Production by Blade.

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Afrikaner • art projectbandBoer • Boer culture • chav • counterculture • Die Antwoord • dirtyDJ • DJ Hi-Tek (Marius Bosch) • grungy • lowbrow • lower socioeconomic status • mulletmusic video • Ninja (Watkin Tudor Jones) • othernessover-the-top • pejorative • poor white people • prankprovocativerap • rap-rave • raveshocksituationist • slur • social classSouth Africa • South African • subculturetrio • underclass • Watkin Tudor Jones • white trash • working class • Yolandi Visser • zef

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2008

Coyle and Sharpe: pioneering street pranksters

"On San Francisco's Market Street last week, two somber–faced public–opinion 'pollsters' approached a young man, thrust a microphone in his face, and after a few minutes of earnest conversation asked: 'Would you be interested in helping future generations to fly?' When the young man said 'yes,' the pollsters asked: 'Well, then, would you let us graft a pair of chicken wings on your forehead?' The subject was dubious but the interviewers refused to give up. 'Well, how about just one wing?' they asked. 'It's absolutely painless, you know.' By the time the exasperated youth shouted: 'Get away from me, you crackpots,' it was too late. The dialogue was on tape, and the zany radio team of James Coyle and Malcome Sharpe had hooked another victim.

For the past eight months, Coyle and Sharpe have been roaming the streets of San Francisco looking for likely guinea pigs for their imaginative nonsense. So far, they have duped more than 3,500 San Franciscans into taking part in tape–recorded stunts broadcast a dozen times nightly over a KGO radio disk–jockey show. Combining some of the elements of 'Truth or Consequences' and 'Candid Camera,' Coyle and Sharpe have rapidly made themselves one of KGO's most popular features. Each week the pair gets more mail than any of the ABC station's other performers.

Coyle and Sharpe have, among other things, recruited a private army of 14,000 San Franciscans to invade Los Angeles to solve the smog problem; they have sold a clothing salesman on the notion of putting insects into the pockets of men's suits) to familiarize the buyers with entomology); they have tried to rent out the pigeons in Golden Gate Park at $1.50 an hour; they have asked people if they would permit cornflake advertisements to be printed in their eyeballs, and they once convinced a San Francisco businessman to give physical–fitness demonstrations on a pedestal in Union Square. The executive balked only after Coyle and Sharpe proposed thet he be attacked by a flock of trained birds 'to prove that people can exercise when under pressure.'"

(Newsweek, January 13 1964)

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absurdabsurditybelonging • Candid Camera • Coyle & Sharpe on the Loose • hidden microphone • human naturehumourimprovisationinterventioninterview • James Coyle • Jim Coyle • Mal Sharpe • Malcolm Sharpe • man-on-the-street • moral imaginationsparticipationperformancepioneeringprankradioSan Franciscosocial reality • terrorizations • truth or consequences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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