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Which clippings match 'Activism' keyword pg.1 of 6
29 OCTOBER 2017

Michael Glassco: Contested images: the politics and poetics of appropriation

"The dissertation traces the tactics of appropriation of Barbara Kruger, The Billboard Liberation Front and Shepard Fairey as exemplars of transgression and commodification within the changing commercial conditions of neo-liberalism. Their works, tactics and strategies are emphasized as points of insight into the practices and conditions of subversion as well as the limits of hegemonic containment that reproduces the political and economic structure within which they operated. The dissertation furthers and contributes to the theoretical and methodology of critical cultural studies as it emphasizes the role of the economy and ideology in reproducing the prevailing hegemonic order. Critical cultural studies hinges on the concepts of hegemony as lived discursive and ideological struggles over meaning and communication resources within historically specific and socially structured contexts. This framework emphasizes the poetics of appropriation - the use, meaning and spaces of articulation of visual representations with the politics - the socio-economic and discursive conditions that reproduce the dominant social order."

(Michael Glassco, 2012, University of Iowa)

TAGS

2012activismAdbustersadvertising hijacking • advertising imagery • advertising messages • appropriated images • appropriation activists • appropriation artists • appropriation practices • appropriation tactics • Barbara Kruger • Billboard Liberation Front • bricoleur • Buy Nothing Day • co-optioncommodificationconstructed identitiesconsumption spectaclecritical cultural hijacking • critical cultural studies • critique in public spaces • critique power • culture jammingdiscursive struggles • fauxvertising • graphic agitator • guerrilla artGuerrilla Girlsguerrilla tactics • hegemonic containment • hegemony • ideological struggle • ideological systems • ideological warfare • images of appropriation • institutionalised art • Jenny Holzer • manufacturing identity • media hijacking • Michael Glassco • neoliberalismparticipatory engagement • pastiche of visual codes • PhD thesis • poetics of appropriation • political protest • prevailing hegemonic order • privatisation of culture • public space • rebellious bricoleur • revolutionary subjects • Robbie Conal • Rosemary Coombe • Shepard Fairey • sublimating desire • subversionsubvertisements • subvertising • systematic asymmetries of power • tactic of dissent • tactical strikes • tactics of appropriation • tactics of guerrilla semiotics • The Billboard Liberation Front • transgression • TV Turn off Week • un-commercials • unequal access to cultural resources • University of Iowavisual codesvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 SEPTEMBER 2017

Truth In Advertising: Guerrilla Art in Santa Cruz 1980-1985

"The photographs in this exhibit are of actual altered billboards that appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz, California from 1980 to 1985. The photographs have been adjusted for brightness, contrast, and parallax, but no content changes were made.

The billboards were made over by a clandestine network of midnight billboard editors operating under the name of Truth In Advertising, or TIA for short.

This exhibit of their historic work was first presented in 2007 at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. The exhibit is made up of 12 billboards presented in the order in which they appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz. The sequence also tells the story of Truth in Advertising, and documents publicity and commentary."

(Bob Stayton)

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TAGS

1980sactivismadadvertising billboardsadvertising hijackingappropriation practicesbillboardbillboard bandit • Bob Stayton • brandalismcritical cultural hijackingculture jammingdetournement publicitaireguerrilla artguerrilla tacticsmedia hijacking • media reinterpretation • re-purposerecombinatory practiceridicule • Santa Cruz • transformative works • Truth in Advertising (TIA) • William Board (pseudonym)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2015

Spare Rib magazines available via JISC Journal Archives

"Few titles sum up an era and a movement like Spare Rib. When the first issue came out in July 1972, many women were starting to question their position and role in society. The magazine was an active part of the emerging women's liberation movement. It challenged the stereotyping and exploitation of women in what was the first national magazine of its kind. It supported collective, realistic solutions to the hurdles women faced and reached out to women from all backgrounds. Spare Rib became the debating chamber of feminism in the UK. It continued until January 1993 and the full archive of 239 magazines provides a valuable insight into women's lives and this period of feminist activity."

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TAGS

19721993 • abortion • activism • Alice Walker • archival research • Betty Friedan • British Library • challenging the status quo • digitisation programmedomestic violenceeducational resource • exploitation of women • female sexual experience • feminism • feminist activity • feminist community • feminist issues • feminist magazine • feminist perspective • feminist researchers • feminist strugglesgender equalitygender stereotypes • Germaine Greer • hair care • honest style • intellectual heritage • Jisc Journal Archives • magazine • Margaret Drabble • national magazine • news stories • online archive • ordinary women • position in society • progeny • radical feminism • research archive • role in society • Rosie Boycott • second-wave feminism • self-defence • sexist advertisements • sexuality • Spare Rib (magazine) • status quotheir stories • third-wave feminism • UKwomen • womens liberation movement • womens studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project–one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti–feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti–trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference–at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti–trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspectivefeminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate womentrafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2013

Guerrilla Gardening: Seed Bombs & Seed Balls

"I've been following guerrilla gardening on Twitter for quite some time, and have become familiar with the term 'seed bombing' as a result. It's an idea that's always appealed to me – it's a kind of eco–friendly, bee–friendly, slightly radical anti–vandalism activism – but it's just one of those things that I'd never pursued. ...

So how do they work? It's a simple process really – the seeds I bought are encased in a ball of peat–free compost, dried clay and chilli, which are hand–rolled in North London (yes, really, and no, it's not what you're thinking). The dried clay acts as a protective casing from common seed predators (such as ants, mice and birds). When enough rain permeates the clay, the seeds inside begin to germinate – helped along by the nutrients and minerals contained within the balls. So it's like a tiny self–sufficient seeding system. Maya [http://www.mayaproject.org/] have added chili powder to the mix to help to deter predators while the seed ball slowly degrades, and eventually the seeds sprout."

(Lucy Small, 5 April 2013)

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TAGS

activismagriculture • anti-vandalism activism • ball • bee-friendly • chili • compost • DIY gardening • earthcare • eco-friendly • fairshare • gardening • germination • guerrilla gardeningguerrilla tacticsNative Americans • peat-free compost • peoplecare • permacultureplants • project MAYA • seed • seed balls • seed bomb • seed bombing • seed bombs • seeding system • self-sufficientsustainable society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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