Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Church' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 NOVEMBER 2014

They Live: sunglasses reveal subliminal capitalist messages

"John Carpenter's They Live (1988), one of the neglected masterpieces of the Hollywood Left, is a true lesson in critique of ideology. It is the story of John Nada–Spanish for 'nothing'! –, a homeless laborer who finds work on a Los Angeles construction site, but has no place to stay. One of the workers, Frank Armitage, takes him to spend the night at a local shantytown. While being shown around that night, he notices some odd behavior at a small church across the street. Investigating it the next day, he accidentally stumbles on several more boxes hidden in a secret compartment in a wall, full of sunglasses. When he later puts on a pair of the glasses for the first time, he notices that a publicity billboard now simply displays the word 'OBEY,' while another billboard urges the viewer to 'MARRY AND REPRODUCE.' He also sees that paper money bears the words 'THIS IS YOUR GOD.' Additionally he soon discovers that many people are actually aliens who, when they realize he can see them for what they are, the police suddenly arrive. Nada escapes and returns to the construction site to talk over what he has discovered with Armitage, who is initially uninterested in his story. The two fight as Nada attempts to convince and then force him to put on the sunglasses. When he does, Armitage joins Nada and they get in contact with the group from the church, organizing resistance. At the group's meeting they learn that the alien's primary method of control is a signal being sent out on television, which is why the general public cannot see the aliens for what they are. In the final battle, after destroying the broadcasting antenna, Nada is mortally wounded; as his last dying act, he gives the aliens the finger. With the signal now missing, people are startled to find the aliens in their midst."

(Slavoj Zizek)

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TAGS

1988advertising billboardsalien invasion • alien occupation • broadcasting antenna • buy and obey • Cable 54 • capitalist ideologychurchconsumerism • contact lenses • control • critique of capitalism • critique of ideologycult filmcultural critique • drifter • dystopia • homeless labourer • Hooverville • ideology • John Carpenter • Keith David • kick ass and chew bubble gumLos Angelesmass mediamedia consumermedia consumption • Meg Foster • nameless drifter • passive consumptionpervasive advertisingpost-ideological society • prophetic • Roddy Piper • ruling class • satirical film • science fiction • shantytown • Slavoj Zizek • subliminal advertising • subliminal messages • sunglassesThe Perverts Guide to Ideology (2012)They Live (1988)threat • underground organisation • unmasked • watch television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2012

O Tamaiti: young boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings

"Sima Urale's debut short film, beautifully realised in black and white, tells the story of a young Samoan boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings. As his parents struggle in their new country, he is overwhelmed by the responsibility. When faced with his grief, the adults fail to recognise his pain. Poignant attention to details that convey a child's perspective (eg. the movement of a spacies game and shopping trolley are intercut) saw O Tamaiti win awards at film festivals around the globe, including the prestigious Silver Lion at Venice."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig. 1 Dir. Sima Urale, 15mins, NZ, 1996, black & white, 1.1:66

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TAGS

1996Aotearoa New Zealandarcade gameattention to detailAustralasiababyblack and whitechildrenchilds perspectivechurch • Coke machine • coming of age • cot death • deathdebutfamily • female filmmaker • hospitalimmigrant • Kara Paewai • kiwi short films • new baby • New Zealand • New Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • O Tamaiti • PacificPacific IslanderPolynesianpregnancySamoan • sensitive portrayal • shopping trolley • short filmsiblings • Sima Urale • socialsoundSpace InvadersspaciesThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2012

Transitional Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch

"2011年2月22日に発生したM6.3のカンタベリー地震は、街のシンボル的存在であったクライストチャーチ大聖堂にも深刻な被害をもたらした。これを受け、新たな仮設のカテドラルを設計することとなった。

現地で調達可能な紙管とコンテナーを用いて三角形の断面を形成する。オリジナルの大聖堂の平面と立面のジオメトリーを受け継ぎ、同じ長さの紙管の角度を徐々に変化させている。700人収容可能で、教会としての機能の他に、多くのイベントやコンサートとしての使用も視野に入れている。

2011年7月31日に、同地にてプレス発表が行われた。2013年2月頃の完成を目指している。

The February 2011 Christchurch earthquake (magnitude 6.3) inflicted crippling damage on the Christchurch Cathedral which was the symbol of city. In response to this situation, we were asked to design new temporary cathedral.

Paper tubes of the equal length and 20 ft containers form triangular shape. Since geometry is decided by plan and elevations of the original cathedral, there is a gradual change in each angle of paper tubes. This cathedral, which has a capacity of 700 people, can be used as an event space and a concert space.

There was a media conference in Christchurch on 31st of July, 2011. We aim to open cardboard cathedral in February, 2013."

(Shigeru Ban Architects)

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TAGS

185819th century • 2011 earthquake • 201322 February 2011 • A-frame • Anglican • Aotearoa New Zealand • architectural form • architecture designbuildingcardboard • cardboard architecture • cardboard cathedral • cathedralChristchurchchurchearthquakeearthquake reconstructionFebruary 2011 • George Gilbert Scott • honeycomb cardboard • honeycomb structureJapanese • Latimer Square • material interventionsmaterialitypaper • parishioners • permanent building • re-erected • SBA • Shigeru Ban • Shigeru Ban Architects • steel • temporarytemporary building • temporary structure • temporary structurestimbertraditional building • transitional • Transitional Cathedral • tubes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2011

The rhizomatic nature of the internet allows certain anti-capitalist groups to ward off the capitalist machinery

"The rhizomatic model presents a problem for the dominant systems of capitalism in place in the global economy and the behavior of capitalism in general. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the function of a capitalist system is a schizophrenic behavior which encompasses the 'decoding' and 'deterritorializing flows' of breaking down existing systems of society such as church or family in order to extract the maximum amount of capital and then instigate 'their violent and artificial reterritorialization' through 'ancillary apparatuses' of capitalism such as the government or corporate bureaucracy which reterritorialize grouped elements to extract an even larger share of capital.2 Like any other system within its reach, the capitalist machinery attempts to behave in this schizophrenic manner with regards to the internet. The rhizomatic nature of the internet, however, allows certain anti–capitalist groups to ward off the capitalist machinery on the net due to the particularly advantageous characteristics of the rhizome for these minority factions."

(Amanda Wasielewski)

2). Amanda Wasielewski (2005). 'The Antidote to Capitalist Power: Rhizomatic Networking on the Internet as a Framework for the Success of Anti–Capitalist Minority Groups Against the Schizophrenic Capitalist Machinery'.

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TAGS

al-Qaida • ancillary apparatuses • anti-capitalism • artificial reterritorialisation • behaviour of capitalism • bureaucracycapitalcapitalism • capitalist machinery • capitalist system • church • corporate bureaucracy • decoding • deterritorialising flows • dominant systems of capitalism • Etoy.CORPORATION • familyFelix GuattariflowsGilles Deleuzeglobal economy • government bureaucracy • Internetnetworksreterritorialisation • reterritorialise • rhizomatic model • rhizomatic nature • rhizome • RTMark • schizophrenic behaviour • schizophrenic manner • systems of society • terrorist • terrorist networks • violent reterritorialisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Private companies are taking responsibility for a growing proportion of post-secondary learning

"For the youngster entering the workforce, work equals learning equals work. Because the new economy is knowledge–based and learning is part of day–to–day economic activity and life, the firm becomes a school in order to compete.

Evidence for this is articulated in the little known but very stimulating book The Monster Under the Bed by Stan Davis and Jim Botkin. The book argues that education, once the province of the church, then the government, is increasingly falling to business since it is business that ends up having to train knowledge workers. Say Davis and Botkin, 'With the move from an agrarian to an industrial economy, the small rural schoolhouse was supplanted by the big brick urban schoolhouse. Four decades ago we began to move to another economy, but we have yet to develop a new educational paradigm, let alone create the 'schoolhouse' of the future, which may be neither school nor house.'"
(Don Tapscott, Policy Options, July–August 1998)

TAGS

1998churchDon Tapscotteducationglobal financial market • Jim Botkin • knowledge workerlearningnew economypedagogypost-secondaryschool • schoolhouse • social change • Stan Davis • teachingtraininguniversityworkforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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