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Which clippings match 'Computer-mediated Interaction' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 OCTOBER 2015

Computer-Mediated Communication

"While computer-mediated communication use and research are proliferating rapidly, findings offer contrasting images regarding the interpersonal character of this technology. Research trends over the history of these media are reviewed with observations across trends suggested so as to provide integrative principles with which to apply media to different circumstances. First, the notion that the media reduce personal influences—their impersonal effects—is reviewed. Newer theories and research are noted explaining normative 'interpersonal' uses of the media. From this vantage point, recognizing that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects. Additionally, recognizing that media sometimes facilitate communication that surpasses normal interpersonal levels, a new perspective on 'hyperpersonal' communication is introduced. Subprocesses are discussed pertaining to receivers, senders, channels, and feedback elements in computer-mediated communication that may enhance impressions and interpersonal relations."

(Joseph Walther, 1996)

Walther, J. (1996). "Computer-Mediated Communication: Impersonal, Interpersonal, and Hyperpersonal Interaction." Communication Research 23 February: 3-43.

TAGS

1996 • channel expansion theory • computer-mediated communication (CMC)computer-mediated interaction • cues-filtered-out • efficiency framework • electronic propinquity • electronic propinquity theory • experiential and perceptual CMC theories • face-to-face interaction • human behaviour in cyberspace • hyperpersonal model of CMC • interpersonal communication • interpersonal relations • Jochen Peter • Joseph Walther • Marjolijn Antheunis • media richness theory • mediated interactionnonverbal cues • Patti Valkenburg • propinquity • SIDE model • signaling theory • social identity model of deindividuation effects • social influence theory • social information processing (SIP) • social presence theory • teleconferencing research • videoconferencing • warranting • Yair Amichai-Hamburger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2015

Connbox: prototyping a physical product for video presence with Google Creative Lab, 2011

"At the beginning of 2011 we started a wide-ranging conversation with Google Creative Lab, discussing near-future experiences of Google and its products. They had already in mind another brief before approaching us, to create a physical product encapsulating Google voice/video chat services. This brief became known as 'Connection Box' or 'Connbox' for short…

There were interaction & product design challenges in making a simpler, self-contained video chat appliance, amplified by the problem of taking the things we take for granted on the desktop or touchscreen: things like the standard UI, windowing, inputs and outputs, that all had to be re-imagined as physical controls.

This is not a simple translation between a software and hardware behaviour, it’s more than just turning software controls into physical switches or levers.

It involves choosing what to discard, what to keep and what to emphasise.

Should the product allow ‘ringing’ or ‘knocking’ to kickstart a conversation, or should it rely on other audio or visual cues? How do we encourage always-on, ambient, background presence with the possibility of spontaneous conversations and ad-hoc, playful exchanges? Existing ‘video calling’ UI is not set up to encourage this, so what is the new model of the interaction?

To do this we explored in abstract some of the product behaviours around communicating through video and audio. "

(Matt Jones, 26 February 2013, Berg Ltd)

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TAGS

2011 • Apple FaceTime • Berg Ltd • communications interaction interface • computer-mediated interaction • connbox • design prototypedesigning for interaction • development log • Durrell Bishop • experiential proof • form and functionfuture interfacesGolan Levin • Google Creative Lab • Google Hangouts • Google Plus • hardware prototyping • interaction designinteraction styleslive video • Luckybite • material exploration • near-future scenariosOpenFrameworks • physical product • portalproduct design • prototyping brief • research and developmentSkypesoftware prototypingtechnology affordances • teleconference • video calling • video chat • video conferencing • video phone • video presence • video-based communication • videoconferencing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2014

inFORM: prototype for a Dynamic Shape Display

"inFORM is a Dynamic Shape Display that can render 3D content physically, so users can interact with digital information in a tangible way. inFORM can also interact with the physical world around it, for example moving objects on the table's surface. Remote participants in a video conference can be displayed physically, allowing for a strong sense of presence and the ability to interact physically at a distance."

(Daniel Leithinger, Sean Follmer, Alex Olwal, Akimitsu Hogge, Hiroshi Ishii, 2013)

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2013 • Akimitsu Hogge • Alex Olwal • applied research • computationally reconfigurable • computationally transformable • computer-mediated interaction • Daniel Leithinger • digital states • direct interactiondisplay device • dynamic shape display • form and appearancefuture interaction concepts • future materials • Hiroshi Ishii • human-material interaction • inFORM (prototype) • interact with digital information • interactive surfaceinteractive table • Material User Interface (MUI) • materialitiesMIT Media Lab • MIT Media Lab Tangible Media Group • physical and digital interaction • physical form • physical manifestation • radical atoms • reconfigurable material • remote communicationremote partner • Sean Follmer • sense of presence • shapes and formsshapeshiftingshaping our relationship to the material worldtabletoptactile communication • tangible bits • tangible computingtangible interfacestangible visualisationtechnology affordances • transformable material • world around us

CONTRIBUTOR

Alex Sisan
01 DECEMBER 2008

E.M. Forster's The Machine Stops

"The story describes a world in which almost all humans have lost the ability to live on the surface of the Earth, and most of the human population lives below ground. Each individual lives in isolation in a standard 'cell', with all bodily and spiritual needs met by the omnipotent, global Machine. Travel is permitted but unpopular and rarely necessary. The entire population communicates through a kind of instant messaging/video conferencing machine called the speaking apparatus, with which they conduct their only activity, the sharing of ideas and knowledge with each other.
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Clearly, even in 1909 Forster was deeply concerned that Man was in danger of becoming unable to live without the technology that he created, and of forgetting that it was he who created it.

The story predicted several technological and social innovations, such as the 'cinemataphote' (television) and videoconferencing. Forster also sought to establish the value of direct experience, which is threatened by excessive involvement in virtual communities. This shows remarkable foresight, and the book describes many nuances of "online life" over 70 years before the Internet was even invented."
(Jacques de Beaufort)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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