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Which clippings match 'Obsolescence' keyword pg.1 of 6
05 APRIL 2014

What is skeuomorphism?

Dan "O'Hara argues that, strictly speaking, the term skeuomorphism refers only to those vestigial elements in nature or artefact that survive from an original form, even though they are no longer required. At its broadest, this definition extends to the levers and dials in a modern aircraft cockpit, for example, which no longer connect to systems directly, but instead are merely inputs and outputs of a computer that actually controls things. Such controls are skeumorphs because they are holdovers from the days before computerised aircraft, and have been left in their original form for the benefit of pilots, who are used to them working in a particular way.

So can a digital depiction of something properly be called a skeuomorph? It is more accurate to refer to it as a visual metaphor that calls to mind a physical skeuomorph without really being one. The iPhone's notification panel, with its imitation linen effect, was not descended from an object that was once made of linen. The switch that, say, allows you to switch an iPhone into Airplane Mode is not an on-screen replacement for what used to be a physical switch. In the early days of graphical user interfaces, designers employed familiar devices, such as folders, trash cans and other objects commonplace in the office. The result was that operating systems ended up being littered with depictions of things that had never existed inside a digital device; the on-screen 'trash' icon is not the vestigial remnant of an actual trash can that was once part of the computer, which is why it is really a metaphor, not a skeumorph. (That said, as computer graphics became more detailed, the original blocky icons gave way to more detailed depictions of trash cans, folders and so forth, which are arguably skeuomorphs of visual metaphors.)"

(Glenn Fleishman, 25 June 2013, The Economist)

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TAGS

1889 • actual object • Apple • Apple iOS 7 • archaeologyauthenticitycomputer graphicscultural materialism • Dan OHara • digital depiction • familiar devices • faux leather • faux wood panelling • folder • Glenn Fleishman • graphical user interface • holdover • imitation • iOS 7 • metaphor • Microsoft Windows 8 • Microsoft Windows Phone 7 • nostalgiaobsolescence • on-screen replacement • on-screen textures • operating system • ornamental design • ornamental form • physical skeuomorph • romanticism • Scott Forstall • skeumorph • skeuomorphskeuomorphic designskeuomorphismThe Economisttrash can • vestigial remnant • visual depictionvisual metaphor • visual representations • visual simulation • Windows 8 interface • Windows Phone 7 • wood panelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2014

Bruce Sterling: afterglow effects and digital detritus

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2014 • afterglow • afterglow effects • afterlife of objects • Andy Cameron • Arduinoart production • atemporality • Bruce Sterlingcomputational artscypherpunkdebrisdigital culturedigital detritusDIYDragan Espenschiede-waste • electronic frontier • entropyGeocitiesgeopolitical landscape • geopolitics • gold rush • Grateful Dead • hackinginternet of things • John Perry Barlow • Kristoffer Gansing • lived condition • means of production • mulch • net artnet.artnetartobsolescenceobsolete ecologiesobsolete technologyOlia Lialinapunched cardsRaspberry Piredundant technology • Richard Barbrook • surveillance • techart • the futureTransmediale festival • Walt Whitman

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
04 NOVEMBER 2013

YouTube API v2.0: YouTube video response feature discontinued

"YouTube's video responses feature has been retired as explained in this announcement. While existing video responses are still available, YouTube no longer supports the ability to retrieve a list of video responses for a video, to upload new video responses, or to delete video responses, though you can delete the video that was used in a video response. Consequently, these functions are also no longer supported in the API."

(Google Developers, 30 September 2013)

[The feature was retired on 12 September 2013 as explained here: http://youtubecreator.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/so-long-video-responsesnext-up-better.html]

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2013click-through rate • content engagement • David Caraccio • DavidSinRocks • discontinued • fan engagement tools • Google Developers • InVideo Programming • obsolescenceresponse • share video links • software feature • video response • ways to connect • YouTube • YouTube video response

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

A proof of concept of technology which is born to die

"John Rogers is a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the university. Rogers says the goal of the 'born to die' program is to design transient technology that can dissolve at the end of its useful life, thus saving space in landfills and reducing waste. The research team isn't there yet. But it has designed a chip built on a thin film of silk that dissolves when hit with water."

(Associated Press)

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applied research • Associated Press • born to die • design innovationdesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumption • dissolvable materials • e-wasteelectronicsend of lifeimpermanenceinorganic refuse • John Rogers • material interventionsmaterial worldmaterials sciencenew materialsobsolescenceproof of conceptself-destroyingself-destructing • silk • thin filmthrow-away • transient tech • transient technology • University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • useful life • water soluble

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JUNE 2013

1980s chiptune easter egg rediscovered in NZ washing machines

"Twenty years of patriotism on the part of Fisher & Paykel has been revealed thanks to a viral social media video that shows its washing machines can play the national anthem. A video posted on YouTube by a woman on Tuesday has received more than 165,000 hits. The woman explains how to make the washing machine play the New Zealand national anthem.

Fisher & Paykel marketing manager Sonya Aitken said the machines, which can also play the United States and Australian anthems, were programmed to play tunes by the company's engineers for demonstration purposes. ... While the singing machines were used to draw customers' attention in stores 20 years ago, it was no longer part of sales techniques, so the feature had essentially been forgotten and then rediscovered, she said."

(Laura Walters, 21/06/2013, Fairfax NZ News)

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TAGS

1980s8-bit • Advance Australia Fair • anthem • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Beverly Hills Cop (1984) • chiptunecultural significance of objectsdigital archaeologydigital artefactsdomestic material objecteaster egg • Fisher and Paykel • God Defend New Zealand • hidden feature • Home of the Brave • how to do thingsmusic making technology • national anthem • obsolescenceordinary manufactured objectoutgrownpatriotism • power surge • rediscoveredremainderremains of the past • sales technique • social media • Sonya Aitken • tune • United Statesuseless machinesviral video • washing machine • what is left of the pastwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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