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Which clippings match 'Provocation' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 MARCH 2014

An extensive online resource for creating new ideas

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TAGS

absence thinking • action verbs • areas of key value • art streaming • assumption busting • attribute listing • braindrawing • brainmapping • brainstorming • brainwriting • breakdown • challenge • chunking • conflict • Crawford slip method • create new ideas • creative ideas • creative method • creative methods • creative skills • creative stimulus • creative techniques • creative tension • creative thinkingcreative toolscreativity • creativity toolbox • creativity tools • David Straker • day in the life • decomposition • deep analysis • delphi methoddoodlingdrawing • essential qualities • expand thinking • explore ideas • extended ideas • focused thinking • forced conflict • forcing combinations • gain consensus • gradually unfolding • group doodlin • guided imagery • hierarchical breakdown and exploration • how to • how-how diagram • idea generationimagineering • incomplete doodles • incubation • lateral thinking • looking at the problem backwards • lotus blossom • mind-mapping • minimal personal interaction • modelling • morphological analysis • nominal group technique • non-verbal stimulation • online resourcepausepost-it notes • post-up • problem plus stimulus equals idea • provocation • random word • random words • real problem • remembering solutions • remembrance • reversal • reverse brainstorming • rightbraining • role-play • rubber-ducking • scamper • Six Thinking Hats • stimulate the subconscious • stimuli • storyboarding • subconscious • take a break • talk and talk • talk streaming • the Kipling method • think more deeply • thinking sideways • toolbox • triz contradiction analysis • unblock • unconscious assumptions • unfold the flower • unfolding • value engineering • visioning • visual story • wishing • write and write • write streaming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2013

Radical Pedagogies in Architectural Education

"Pedagogical experiments played a crucial role in shaping architectural discourse and practice in the second half of the 20th century. In fact, the key hypothesis of our Radical Pedagogy[1] research project is that these experiments can be understood as radical architectural practices in their own right. Radical in the literal meaning from the Latin radice, as something belonging or relating to the root, to its foundations. Radical pedagogies shake foundations, disturbing assumptions rather than reinforcing and disseminating them. This challenge to normative thinking was a major force in the postwar field of architecture, and has surprisingly been neglected in recent years. ...

Architectural pedagogy has become stale. Schools spin old wheels as if something is happening but so little is going on. Students wait for a sense of activist engagement with a rapidly evolving world but graduate before it happens. The fact that they wait for instruction is already the problem. Teachers likewise worry too much about their place in the institutional hierarchies. Curricular structures have hardly changed in recent decades, despite the major transformations that have taken place with the growth of globalisation, new technologies, and information culture. As schools appear to increasingly favour professionalisation, they seem to drown in self–imposed bureaucratic oversight, suffocating any possibility for the emergence of experimental practices and failures. There are a few attempts to wake things up here and there but it's all so timid in the end. There is no real innovation.

In response to the timidity of schools today, the Radical Pedagogy project returns to the educational experiments of the 1960s and '70s to remind us what can happen when pedagogy takes on risks. It's a provocation and a call to arms."

(Beatriz Colomina with Esther Choi, Ignacio Gonzalez Galan and Anna–Maria Meister, 28 September 2012, The Architectural Review)

1). Radical Pedagogy is an ongoing multi–year collaborative research project by a team of PhD candidates in the School of Architecture at Princeton University, led by Beatriz Colomina and involving seminars, interviews and guest lectures by protagonists and scholars. The project explores a remarkable set of pedagogical experiments of the 1960s and '70s that revolutionised thinking in the discipline. Each student is working on one of these experiments and collectively mapping the interconnections and effects of these experiments towards a major publication and exhibition.

Fig.1 Tournaments in the Course 'Culture of the Body', at the Valparaíso School, 1975. Courtesy of Archivo Histórico Jose Vial, Escuela Arquitectura y Diseño, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso

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TAGS

1960s1970s20th centuryacademic disciplinesactivism • Alberto Perez-Gomez • Alexander Girard • Alexis Josic • alternative visions • Anna-Maria Meister • architectural discourse • architectural educationarchitectural pedagogyarchitectural practice • architectural radicalism • architecturearchitecture schoolsartificial intelligence • autochthonous tools • Beatriz Colomina • brave new worldBuckminster Fullerbureaucratic reduction • bureaucratic structures • call to arms • capitalist structures • Cedric Price • challenging conventionsCharles Eamescold war • collective defiance • conceptual speculation • consumable plastics • conventional logicconventionalityconventions • cultural milieu • cultural transformation • curricular structures • curriculum innovation • cybernetics • Dalibor Vesely • Daniel Libeskind • David Leatherbarrow • decentralised university • Denise Scott Brown • design disciplinedesign educationdesign formalismdesign fundamentalism • disciplinary assumptions • disciplinary limits • disciplinary protocols • disciplinary self-reflexivity • emerging practices • Emilio Ambasz • Esther Choi • experimental pedagogy • experimental practices • experimental teachinggeopolitical landscape • George Candilis • George Nelson • Germano Celant • Giancarlo De Carlo • Gillo Dorfles • globalisationGyorgy KepesHannah Arendthegelian dialecticHenri Lefebvrehermeneutics • Ignacio Gonzalez Galan • information culture • institutional authority • institutional critique • institutional hierarchies • institutionalisation • instrumentality • Jean Baudrillard • Joseph Rykwert • linguisticsman machine • mass produced desire • mass productionmodernist tradition • Mohsen Mostafavi • new social ordernew technologiesNicholas Negroponte • non-architecture • non-school • Octavio Paz • pedagogical experiments • pedagogical institutions • pedagogy • pedagogy experiments • phenomenology • post-technological society • professionalisation • progressive pedagogical initiatives • provocationquestioning traditions • radical architectural pedagogies • radical architectural pedagogy • radical architectural practices • radical pedagogical experiments • radical pedagogies • radical pedagogy • radical practice • radical practices • radical strategies • radical upheaval • radicality • radice • rapidly evolving world • Ray Eamesreconceptualisationredesigningreinterpretationresearch project • retreat into formalism • return to order • Robin Evans • science fictionself-reflexivity • Shadrach Woods • socio-political • socio-political efficacy • spaceships • speculative interventionsspeculative proposalssubversive actions • Suzanne Keller • taking risks • techno-utopia • technological • technological advancestechnological determinism • Texas Rangers • The Architectural Review • transformational engagementUmberto Ecoutopian perspectiveutopian technological prophecyVietnam war

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 DECEMBER 2012

Thought Maybe: a video resource to inform and inspire action

"This is a website that aims to provoke your thoughts not only about these important issues, but many other pertinent topics relevant to modern society, industrial civilisation and globalised dominant culture.

There's already a lot of information on the Internet, so our goal is to cut through the noise and garbage, to present credible information in a clear way, so it's accessible, useful and easily digested. This still may not be an easy undertaking though, and we can understand that – especially considering the complexity and interconnectedness of the topics, as well as the crossing over of sources; but also for the fact that the information here can be incomplete, sometimes contradictory or even controversial. But this is the point. It's all part of what we're trying to do: provoke critical thinking, questioning... and doing.

We've fundamentally built this resource to inform and inspire action – and no, we're not talking about clicking the stupid 'Like' button on Facebook, signing online petitions or letter writing – we mean informing and inspiring real–world action; taking this information away from the computer to rejuvenate the strong networks with the people around you in the real world, to discuss, plan, act. This is not a symbolic action or clicktivism website, it's a resource to inform, inspire and provoke.

We aim to generate a multitude of responses, reactions and methods to the work we're doing, because that's what is needed to solve the plethora of puzzles and problems addressed in the information we publish. Some of these puzzles are big, some are small, but everywhere you look, there's good work to be done."

(Thought Maybe)

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clicktivismcomplexitycontradictioncontradiction and changecontroversial • controversial information • credible informationcritical thinking • crossing over of sources • globalised culture • incite • incomplete information • industrial civilisation • inform and inspire • information • inspire action • interconnectednessmodern societyonline resource • pertinent topics • provocationquestioning • real-world action • rejuvenate networks • strong networks • symbolic action • Thought Maybe • video libraryvideo publishingvideo repositoryvideo resources

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2009

Barbara Kruger: consumerism critic appropriated

Barbara "Kruger wouldn't like the idea that she incarnates the spirit of our time, the bourgeois bohemianism that David Brooks meanly calls "Boboism." She's against the commercial exploitation of anything, her many market tie–ins notwithstanding. If her work consciously advances a position, it's feminism. But although she's a feminist, she's also a theorist trained not to impose her values on other people. She doesn't like to be for things. Instead, she identifies herself with a stance: critical, suspicious, oppositional. Kruger has made a career out of denouncing oppressors, from anti–abortion agitators to wife–beaters, homophobics, racists, and the editors of glossy magazines."
(Judith Shulevitz, 19 July 2000)

[Photo of signage created through a collaboration between Barbara Kruger, Selfridges and advertising agency Mother.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2008

The failure of market failure

"The market failure argument is frequently deployed by policymakers to justify (or not) cases of state intervention into the market, in many cases, to help rectify social ills. However, many economists' understanding of government intervention or public activity which is not organised along market principles is that it is most likely to be hopeless or ineffective simply because it is prompted by government and not by markets. Whilst acknowledging that Intervention may be good in that it promotes the public or citizen interest or social solidarity, they do not see that it is justifiable or desired and the eventual outcome is likely to be self–defeating.

In this provocation, Will Hutton & Philippe Schneider challenge this view on three grounds; that government is not so ineffective on a priori grounds as has been portrayed, that inequalities created by markets are economically inefficient, need to be corrected and the only agency is the state, and that public and social values do have intrinsic worth whose pursuit by governments is perfectly reasonable even if it were true that they are always inefficient – which they are not."

(The failure of market failure: Towards a 21st century Keynesianism)

TAGS

added valuearts fundingcommercialismcreative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipeconomyfundinginnovationJohn Maynard Keynes • Keynes • market failuremarkets • mixed economy • NESTApatron • Philippe Schneider • policyprovocationsocial gainsponsorship • stagflation • state activism • value of art • Will Hutton

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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