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Which clippings match 'Added Value' keyword pg.1 of 4
26 SEPTEMBER 2013

Holiday Inn Express: ad illustrates split between real/online identities

"Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) is launching the first UK television advertisement for Holiday Inn Express to raise awareness of the added value services that differentiate the brand in the crowded mid–priced hotel market."

(Russell Parsons, 9 September 2013, Marketing Week)

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TAGS

2013added value • added value services • brand differentiation • breakfast • business traveller • Centaur Communications Ltd • comparisonconstructed identitiesdigital identity • Holiday Inn Express • hotel • hotel market • Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) • leisure industriesliving digital lives • Marketing Week (site) • mid-price market • online and offlineonline and real world identities • pastel shades • Premier Inn • price point • social media identitiessplit-screen • toothbrush • tv adUKUSPWiFi

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Plug and play: the 'new purpose' of physical consumer space

"an effective physical connection is still absolutely imperative to brand success. Rather than assuming that the physical space is being hindered by the growth of digital activity, brands and designers are beginning to embrace the newer channels where consumers are choosing to spend their time and deliver a physical environment that adds value around these. Get the basic understanding of the 'new purpose' of the physical space right and the physical manifestation of the design will boom from there.

The key is to design interiors that can respond and morph with social and cultural shifts, so that the spaces become a form of 'cultural commentary', adding value to the popular activities of today's audiences. Above all, interior design must be approached in a way that ensures that the brand communicates a relevant message through this critical channel. This can be achieved by considering and responding to three key topics: cultural relevance, social context and technology integration."

(Lucy Johnston, Design Week)

Fig. "The Anthropologist", iloveretail.com

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TAGS

activity and consumption • added valueadded value through design • always connected • audience • brand concepts • brand success • brands • buying online • colourways • communication channel • concrete space • consumer culture • consumer experience • consumerscultural commentarycultural relevance • cultural shifts • design features • design interiors • digital activity • digital designdigital worlddwell timeeffective brand spaceexperience designgraphic designinterior design • Lucy Johnston • new purpose of the physical space • personal freedom • physical connection • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical manifestationphysical retail spacephysical space • plug and play • popular activities • print design • relevant messages • respond and morph • social context • social shifts • solid space • spacesspatial designsuccessful brand spacetechnology integrationuser experience design (UX)virtual world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2012

Design + Culture: A Return to Fundamentalism?

"whilst the application of design is multiplying exponentially, it is also loosing its validity as an authentic cultural icon. It has become synonymous with cloning the face of global culture itself, more often representing the uniformity of mass globalisation, rather than reflecting the facets of cultural difference and diversity.

The cultural attributes of difference and diversity have been fundamentally weakened, and like face that has undergone cosmetic surgery, the result is a facsimile vaguely familiar but disturbingly without a true sense of identity. It is everyone's and no one's, and belongs in no single place more than another. ...

Design has become omnipresent within Culture, as it has been adopted as a convenient badge to add value and market commodity, and to signify identity. Following Designer era of 1980's, the added value of design was replaced by design as cultural value, embodied in leading Brands of the 1990's. ...

in the 21st Century the task of capturing Culture has become more and more difficult in terms of expressing culture through the medium of design. Design increasingly struggles for a clear sense of definition, and one is left asking, what can Culture really mean today, if it is no longer tied to consumer lifestyle? We remain in a post–contemporary state where we require a redefinition of meaning, value and identity. ...

The uncertainty of a designed fusion Culture has replaced the certainty of traditional cultural monoculture. Which in turn has been diluted by an obsession with 'cultural materialism'. What remains of the original cultural sources are being plundered in order to restock our lack of creative DNA. The net result is an erosion of the remaining authentic sources, but also the creation of a 'cultural time lag' which has been generated by a convergence of trans–cultural fusions, hybridisation, and of recurrent cultural cross referencing."

(David Carlson on 21 Mar 21 2011, David Report)

Fig.1 paper sculptures made by Jennifer Collier [http://jennifercollier.co.uk/].

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TAGS

1980199021st centuryadded valueadded value through designaestheticisationapplication of designart and design doctrinearts and craftsauthentic cultural iconauthentic materials • authentic sources • authenticityconsumer brandsconsumer lifestyles • cosmetic surgery • craftcraft nostalgiacreative fundamentalismcreativitycultural cross referencingcultural identitycultural materialismcultural monoculturedecorationderivativedesign • design as cultural value • design craftdesign essentialismdesign fundamentalismdesign innovationdesign revisionism • difference and diversity • expressing culture • global culture • globalisationhomogenizationhybridisationlegitimacymarket commodity • mass globalisation • monoculturenostalgia • original cultural sources • post-contemporary • post-traditional • redefinition of meaning • sewn typography • traditional cultural monoculture • trans-cultural fusions • trendsuniformityvalidityvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2010

Acquiring new media works

"Museologists face a new reality in our fast–changing high–tech world. Works with technological components pose unfamiliar challenges and require acquisition procedures that differ from traditional practices. Primarily, this means giving careful consideration to the notions of copyright (intellectual property), conservation and artist collaboration prior to the purchase of media–based art.

The Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices report, produced by the DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee, indicates that few museum institutions have established a specific policy for acquiring new media works. Yet a policy of this sort is an important tool: used to assess the characteristics and short–, medium– and long–term conservation and exhibition needs of such works, it can help museums make informed choices when envisaging additions to their collections."

(DOCAM)

TAGS

acquisition procedures • acquisitionsadded value • artist collaboration • arts and innovationarts fundingcommercialismconservationcopyrightcreative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • DOCAM • DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee • entrepreneurexhibitionfunding • high-tech world • intellectual propertymarket failuremarkets • media-based art • museologymuseumnew media • new media works • patronpolicysocial gainsponsorship • Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
02 MARCH 2010

Reading ban on leaked Harry Potter

"Fourteen fans bought Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince from The Real Canadian Superstore in Coquitlam on the west coast of Canada before managers realised their mistake [selling books that were under embargo]. But readers will be unable to share their knowledge after Raincoast Books, the book's Canadian publisher, was granted a 'John Doe' injunction prohibiting the buyers from even reading their copies before the publication date.

The supreme court of British Columbia issued a court order preventing anyone from 'displaying, reading, offering for sale, selling or exhibiting in public' their books. J. K. Rowling's legal advisers said that the author was entitled to prevent buyers from reading their own books even though they had not broken the law.

'The fact is that this is property that should not have been in their possession,' said Neil Blair, a legal specialist for Christopher Little, the author's literary agent. 'Copyright holders are entitled to protect their work. If the content of the book is confidential until July 16, which it is, why shouldn't someone who has the physical book be prevented from reading it and thereby obtaining the confidential information? How they came to have access to the book is immaterial'."

(The Times Online)

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TAGS

added valuearts and innovationarts fundingauthorbookBritish ColumbiaCanadacommercialismconfidentialcopyright • Coquitlam • creative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • embargo • entrepreneurfundingHarry Potter • Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince • JK Rowlingmarket failuremarketspatron • Raincoast Books • social gainsponsorship • The Real Canadian Superstore • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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