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Which clippings match 'Media Paradigm Shift' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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TAGS

adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

The BBC is shifting it's emphasis from programme making to experience creation

"BBC Future Media and Technology's Head of Research and Development, Matthew Postgate, kicked off the event by noting that the BBC is shifting it's emphasis from programme making to experience creation – it's 'all about creating media experiences, not just consuming pieces of content.' Working with the AHRC has helped the BBC to better understand how well it's current activities are doing this, leading to improvements in the future. "

(Robin Hamman, Headshift, UK)

TAGS

AHRCauthorshipBBC • BBC Future Media and Technology • communicationdialogicdigital cultureexperience creation • from content production to experience creation • Headshift • innovationinteraction • Matthew Postgate • media experiences • media paradigm shiftR&Dresearch and developmentscriptibleUKuser experience design (UX)user-generated content

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2009

Twitter switch for Guardian, after 188 years of ink

"the Guardian today announces that it will become the first newspaper in the world to be published exclusively via Twitter, the sensationally popular social networking service that has transformed online communication.

The move, described as 'epochal' by media commentators, will see all Guardian content tailored to fit the format of Twitter's brief text messages, known as 'tweets', which are limited to 140 characters each.
...
At a time of unprecedented challenge for all print media, many publications have rushed to embrace social networking technologies. Most now offer Twitter feeds of major breaking news headlines, while the Daily Mail recently pioneered an iPhone application providing users with a one–click facility for reporting suspicious behaviour by migrants or gays. 'In the new media environment, readers want short and punchy coverage, while the interactive possibilities of Twitter promise to transform th,' the online media guru Jeff Jarvis said in a tweet yesterday, before reaching his 140–character limit, which includes spaces. According to subsequent reports, he is thinking about going to the theatre tonight, but it is raining :(.

A unique collaboration between The Guardian and Twitter will also see the launch of Gutter, an experimental service designed to filter noteworthy liberal opinion from the cacophony of Twitter updates. Gutter members will be able to use the service to comment on liberal blogs around the web via a new tool, specially developed with the blogging platform WordPress, entitled GutterPress."
(Rio Palof, 1 April 2009, The Guardian, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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