Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Analogue' keyword pg.1 of 3
12 AUGUST 2012

Rob Nilsson: indie filmmaker and small format video feature pioneer

"Rob Nilsson pioneered small analog and digital formats and created a low–budget cinematic style called direct action. He established the Tenderloin Action Group (now called the Tenderloin yGroup) in 1990, a drama workshop for homeless people, inner–city San Francisco residents and professional actors. He was the first video maker to blow up small–format video to 35 mm film for international theatrical distribution. His work has screened at festivals in the United States and abroad, including Mill Valley, Toronto, Santa Barbara, San Francisco and Locarno. Nilsson's work has been honored with numerous awards, including the Camera d'Or at Cannes and the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival (he was the first American Director to win both)."

(Media Arts Fellow)

Fig.1 scene from Rob Nilsson (1987). "Heat and Sunlight", Betacam SP to 35mm film transfer.

1

TAGS

198535mmAmerican directoranalogueanalogue and digital formatsavailable lightBetacam SPblack and white • blow up small-format video • Chikara Motomura • cinema of the street • cinematic style • citizen cinema (ethos) • convergence • direct action (ethos) • Dogme 95film actingfilmmakerfly-on-the-wallindependent cinemaindependent filmindie cinemainfluential directorlow budgetlow lightlow-budgetlow-budget film • Media Arts Fellow • Michael Edo Keane • new technical possibilitiesrealism • Rob Nilsson • San Francisco • Signal 7 (film) • small format video feature • tape to film transfer • Tenderloin Action Group • Tenderloin yGroup • underground cinema • video to film transfer • videomaker

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Impossible Project Brings Back Polaroid

"In October 2008 The Impossible Project saved the last Polaroid production plant for integral instant film in Enschede (NL) and started to invent and produce totally new instant film materials for traditional Polaroid cameras. In 2010 Impossible saved analog instant photography from extinction by releasing various, brand new and unique instant films."

(The Impossible Project)

1

TAGS

2008analoguebrandcameracamera-making business • chemical solution • chemicals • company • convergencedigital technology • Enschede • enterpriseentrepreneurshipfilmiconicinnovation • insolvent • instant film • instant photographymanufacturingmaterialsNetherlandsnostalgiaobsolescenceold mediaphotographyPolaroidproduct change • product production • radical innovationsolutionSX-70technology • The Impossible Project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2011

Computer Art at the Victoria and Albert Museum

"The V&A has been collecting computer–generated art and design since the 1960s. More recently, the Museum acquired two significant collections of computer–generated art and design, and together these form the basis of the UK's emerging national collection of Computer Art.

The Museum's holdings range from early experiments with analogue computers and mechanical devices, to examples of contemporary software–based practices that produce digital prints and computer–generated drawings. The earliest work in the collection dates from 1952 and is a long exposure photograph of electronic beams on an analogue computer, by artist Ben Laposky.

More recently, the V&A has acquired a large digital inkjet print from 2008, which is nearly two metres long and was created using pixel mapping software designed by American artist Mark Wilson.

The collection consists predominately of two–dimensional works on paper, such as plotter drawings, screenprints, inkjet prints, laser prints and photographs, as well as artists' books, from around the world. Early practitioners of computer art were working in Britain, France, Germany, and Spain, as well as the United States, Japan and South America."

(Victoria and Albert Museum)

Fig.1 Herbert W. Franke 'Oscillogramm' (1956)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2010

Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera Alpha 1: analogue instant photography

"In 1972, another revolution in instant photography was launched when Land introduced his instant 'pocket' SLR called the SX–70. This collapsible camera would indeed fit into a jacket pocket when folded, and when unfolded offered SLR viewing and focusing. The new integral–pack instant prints developed in just a few minutes and didn't require peeling."

(Chris Foresman, 21 February 2008, Ars Technica)

1
2

TAGS

1972Alfred StieglitzanalogueArs Technicacamera • collapsible camera • craftcultural technologydesigndevice • Edwin Land • Fresnel lens • innovationinstantinstant photography • instant prints • instructional design • Land Camera • photographypioneering • pocket SLR • PolaroidPolaroid camera • Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera • product designSLRSX-70technologyusability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2009

Digital Britain: Media today is participative, interactive, equal and many-to-many

"This will represent a significant change to the old analogue models of distribution, of monetisation and of participation. Media today is participative, interactive, equal and many–to–many. Where traditionally innovation and creativity was largely the domain of specialist teams in large organisations, today there is a creative revolution which is rooted in the opportunities afforded by connectivity. There is a significant opportunity to take the success of our creative industries into this interactive and participative world."
(Digital Britain: Final Report, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, June 2009, UK)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.