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Which clippings match 'Choreography' keyword pg.1 of 9
14 NOVEMBER 2014

Body Navigation: austere ambience of projection-dance work

"Two dancers and their digital reproduction are the scenographic frame of this humorous and emotional portrait of human relations. Based on rules and structured in a game like manner, the installation makes way for a playful dialog between the man, woman and the digital 'footprints' they leave behind.

The Body Navigation performance was originally part of a larger installation and modern dance performance in Copenhagen, by Tim Rushton, Danish Dance Theatre called Labyrint.

We used processing for the infrared blobtracking of the dancers and drawing the open gl graphics. During the performance Tina controlled the whole thing live from an Isadora–based interface via osc."

Body Navigation: dance installation and choreography for Labyrint at Kaleidoskop K2, Copenhagen 2008. Video artist: Ole Kristensen and Jonas Jongejan; choreography: Tina Tarpgaard; dancers: Hilary Briggs, Luca Marazia, Nelson R. R. Smith and Laura Lohi; produced by: Danish Dance Theatre.

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2008 • Athelas Sinfonietta • austere ambience • austere environment • black and white • body movement • Body Navigation (2008) • boundary functionschoreographyCopenhagendance performance • Danish Dance Theatre • digital footprints • digital reproduction • doppelgangerfloor • footprints • geometry • Gyorgy Ligeti • Hilary Briggs • human re­lations • infrared camera • infrared tracking • interactive projectioninteractive videoIsadora • Jonas Jongejan • Kaleidoskop K2 • Laura Lohi • Luca Marazia • Mathias Friis-Hansen • movement performance • Nelson Smith • Ole Kristensen • Open Sound Control (OSC) • palimpsestpartition of spacepatterns of movementperformance • play­ful dialogue • playful workPongprojected from overhead • Recoil Performance Group • scenograph­ic frame • software artspatial mapping • Tina Tarpgaard • tracingtrajectoryvideo projectionvoronoi

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
15 AUGUST 2013

Busby Berkeley: choreographing the epic visual spectacle

"Berkeley's choreography is important less for its movement of the dancers than for its movement of the camera. To overcome the limitations of sound stages, he ripped out walls and drilled through ceilings and dug trenches for his film crews. When a desired effect could not be accomplished with traditional film equipment, he had his budget expanded to include costs for developing custom rigs. His innovations explored ideas that the stationary camera could not. He wanted to take the audience through waterfalls and windows. He wanted lines of dancers to fall away to reveal scenery that in turn would fall away to expose an even larger setting. His dreams were big, but his determination to see them actualized was even bigger.

Even his worst attempts resulted in eminently watchable movies of exhilarating movement, but his best efforts produced startling effects that bordered on surrealistic dream states. In the quintessential Berkeley films Footlight Parade (1933) and 42nd Street (1933), cameras mounted on tracks are sent soaring past a multitude of dancing legs, flailing arms and orchestra instruments. In all, he directed more than twenty musicals, including an underwater sequence with aquatic star Esther Williams."

(Scott Smith, 6 February 2013, Keyframe)

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42nd Street (1933) • aesthetic spectacleBusby Berkeleycamera angle • camera movement • camera rig • choreographic imaginationchoreographies for camerachoreographydance • dance productions • dancers • dancing legs • design formalismentertainment spectacle • Esther Williams • figures in space • flailing arms • Footlight Parade (1933) • geometryglamourgroupingkaleidoscopelegs • Lloyd Bacon • mirrored effectmovementmusical (genre)perspective viewscenerysound stage • stationary camera • surrealist stylesymmetry • underwater sequence • visual designvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacular • waterfa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

19th Kalamata International Dance Festival

The Kalamata International Dance Festival began in 1995 to promote dance and showcase the work of talented Greek and international choreographers.

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1995artistic expressionchoreographycontemporary arts • contemporary dance • contemporary dance festival • dance • dance festival • festivalGreece • Kalamata International Dance Festival • performanceperforming arts • Qudus Onikeku • Rachid Ouramdane • showcase • Ultima Vex • Vicky Marangopouloy • Wim Vandekeybus

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Daito Manabe + Nosaj Thing: Eclipse/Blue

"We first got the chance to ascend into Nosaj Thing's sonic dreamworld at our The Creators Project: New York 2011, where he performed alongside some fittingly fantastical installations like Zigelbaum + Coelho's Six–Forty by Four–Eighty and Team Dis–Kinect's motion–mimicking puppet. Engaged in a subtle dance with his MPD32, Nosaj wove together a pounding, wistful set before projected visuals. As surreal as that live experience was, its visual component is nothing compared to what technology artist Daito Manabe has accomplished for Nosaj Thing's 'Eclipse/Blue.'

With support from The Creators Project, and collaborating with Perfume choreographer MIKIKO, Manabe created a dynamic virtual environment to serve as the backdrop for two dancers whose movements across the stage are amplified by the graphics behind them, making each action feel larger and more emotive."

(The Creators Project)

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abstractionalgorithmic art • artist and producer • Blonde Redhead • choreography • collaborators • computational aesthetics • Daito Manabe • dance performancedesign formalism • Eclipse/Blue • electronic musicgenerative design • Home (album) • J-PopJapanese • Kazu Makino • MIKIKO • minimalist electronicamusic video • Nosaj Thing • pattern • Perfume (band) • Point Grey (camera) • programmed stage show • projection artprojection mappingprojection worksreactive graphicsshadow puppet • Takcom (artist) • The Creators Project • visual abstractionvisual spectaclevisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Sky Arts Futures Fund: competitive arts funding to make it happen

Applications open on 25th September and close on 19th December 2012.

"Sky Arts also seeks to connect with culture on the ground, supporting and investing in the arts from leading organisations to emerging artists in the UK and Ireland through the Sky Arts Ignition Series. The Futures Fund is part of the Sky Arts Ignition Series and offers five artists each year £30,000 plus mentoring to help you develop your creative practice. ...

Whether you want to direct a piece of theatre, choreograph a new dance piece, write a play, record an album, create a sculpture, a live art performance or produce, Sky Arts will give you the time and money to make it happen.They'll also pair you with a mentor from Sky and the arts to help you develop your networks, skills and knowledge in the arts and the commercial sector.

We invite you to submit an application in one of five categories; Theatre, Writing and Performance; Music; Visual Art; Dance; Creative Producer."

(IdeasTap Ltd. UK)

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2012 • artistic ambitions • artsarts funding • arts investment • arts organisations • arts sector • Benedict Cumberbatch • BSkyBchoreographycommercial sectorcreative networkscreative practice • creative producer • creative talentdance • Darcey Bussell • emerging artists • funding ideas • Futures Fund (Sky) • IdeasTap • knowledge and skills • live art performance • make it happen • mentoring • music funding • Nigel Kennedy • nurture and support • off-screen • on-screen • playwriting • record an album • Republic of Ireland • Sky Arts • Sky Arts Ignition • Sky Arts Ignition Series • the artstheatre • time and money • Tracey EminUKvisual arts • writing and performance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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