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Which clippings match 'Chinese' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 MARCH 2013

Chinoiserie at Lincolnshire's Belton House

"Hand painted C18th Chinese wallpaper at Belton in the Chinese Bedroom with a continuous scene of a garden party. Cornice, dado and other joinery painted to imitate bamboo."

(National Trust, UK)

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TAGS

18th centurybamboobedroom • Belton House • Chinese • Chinese Bedroom • Chinese wallpaper • Chinoiseriecontinuous scenedecordecorationdecorative artsdepictionEast Midlands • furnishings • garden party • great country house • hand-paintedinterior designLincolnshire • National Trust • National Trust Images • oriental • orientalismornamentalpaintingscenery • stately home • UKvisual designvisual patternwallpaper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2013

Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington museum and other collections

"We have long been familiar with the power of the Chinese to balance colours, but we were not so well acquainted with their power of treating purely ornamental or conventional forms ; and in the chapter in the Grammar of Ornament on Chinese Ornament I was led, from my then knowledge, to express the opinion that the Chinese had not the power of dealing with conventional ornamental form : but it now appears that there has been a period in which a School of Art existed in China of a very important kind. We are led to think that this art must in some way have had a foreign origin; it so nearly resembles in all its principles the art of the Mohammedan races, that we may presume it was derived from them. It would be no difficult task to take a work of ornament of this class, and, by simply varying the colouring and correcting the drawing, convert it into an Indian or Persian composition. There is of course, in all these works, something essentially Chinese in the mode of rendering the idea, but the original idea is evidently Mohammedan. The Moors of the present day decorate their pottery under the same instinct, and follow the same laws as the Chinese obeyed in their beautiful enamelled vases. The Moorish artist takes a rudely–fashioned pot or other object, and by a marvellous instinct divides the surface of the object, 'by spots of colour, into triangles of proportionate area, according to the form and size of the object; these triangles are then crossed by others."

(Owen Jones, 1867)

Owen Jones (1867). "Examples of Chinese Ornament Selected from Objects in the South Kensington Museum and Other Collections: By Owen Jones. One Hundred Plates", S. & T. Gilbert, 4 Copthall Buildings, E.C. Back of the Bank of England.

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1867 • ceramic glaze • ceramicsChinesecolourcompositioncultural heritagecultural significance of objectsdecorationdecorative arts • enamel • enamelled vases • flowersformglazeIndianInternet ArchiveIslamicmaterial culture • Mohammedan • Moorish • Moors • motifMuslim • object surface • orientalismornamentalornamental formOwen JonesPeoples Republic of China • Persian • pigmentpotspottery • rudely fashioned • South Kensingtonsymbolic meaning • vase • visual appearancevisual designvisual grammar • visual heritage • visual motifvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
10 FEBRUARY 2013

River of Wisdom: animated version of a Song Dynasty painting

"After debuting at the Expo 2010 Shanghai China (2010上海世界博覽會) and traveling to Hong Kong and Macau, an animated version of the Song Dynasty painting Along the River During the Qingming Festival (清明上河圖), by 12th–century artist Zhang Zeduan (張澤端), is on show in Taipei. The 25cm by 529cm original is a panoramic portrayal of everyday life in Bianjing (汴京), today's Kaifeng (開封), the capital of China during the Song Dynasty. Despite its name, the scroll depicts the architecture and scenery of the period and the apparel and activities of the rich and poor, not the rituals of the Qingming Festival (清明節), otherwise known as Tomb Sweeping Festival. Thirty times larger than the original painting, the animated version, which is titled River of Wisdom, is beamed onto a 6m by 110m screen by 12 projectors. The entire work was digitalized by Crystal CG (水晶石數字科技公司) and its subjects and backdrops move and make sounds."

(Lin King, 29 July 2011, Taipei Times)

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12th century20103D animation • Along the River During • animatedanimated experienceanimated paintinganimation • apparel • Beijing • Bianjing • Chinesecontinuous scene • Crystal CG • everyday life • Expo 2010 • flat picture planeflat spaceHong Kongimmersive experience • Kaifeng • large scale installation • life-size replica • living paintingliving pictures • Macau • Ming Dynasty • painting • Palace Museum • panoramapanoramic portrayal • Qing court • Qingming Festival • Qingyuan • Qiu Ying • remediation • rich and poor • ritual • River of Wisdom • sceneryscrollShanghai • Song Dynasty • Taipei • Taipei Times • Tomb Sweeping Festival • video muralvirtual heritage • Zhang Zeduan

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
18 JANUARY 2013

Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art

"Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD–Rom, DVD–Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth–century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD–Rom. A novel research archive of international significance, the collection complements the holdings in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of illuminated manuscripts and the early modern printed book, and adds to the breadth of its important collections in human sexuality, Asian Studies, and Media, Film, and Music."

(Cornell University Library)

TAGS

2002American • American new media arts • archiveart • catalogues • CD-ROMChinese • Chinese new media arts • cinemacollection • commercialisation of mass media • Contact Zones • Cornell UniversityCornell University Library • designs • digital interfaces • DVD-ROMfilmholdingsinstallation • international art • InternetInternet artmass mediamediamonographs • multimedia artworks • musicnet artnew media artnew media artsonline and offlinephotography • Professor Rose Goldsen • research archive • resource guides • soundspecial collections • Timothy Murray • twentieth-century developments • unpublished manuscripts • video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2009

multilingual and multicultural networks of shared interest

"Hundreds of thousands of Africans, Asians and Latin Americans have started blogging, opening up a library of human knowledge in local languages to those who are willing to listen, and making the internet a far more multilingual and multicultural place (Block, 2004). A recent Technorati study found that Chinese and Japanese have overtaken English as the dominant languages of the blogosphere, and that growing native–language communities are emerging all over the net.6 Thus, the language issue in the context of Web 2.0 technology is increasingly less about content–creation and access, and more about content–transfer. Translating between two languages requires an appreciation of the 'intellectual, ideological and social understandings upon which speech is based' (Powell, 2006: 522). This is certainly one of the areas where Web 2.0 faces some serious challenges. Specialised sites, such as Global Voices Online (see Box 2), however, have been developed to organise, translate and distribute this local knowledge. And even when people are not blogging in their native languages, they are sharing knowledge about their local realities. Knowledge–creation is itself a hugely empowering experience for any individual, and the benefits of such empowerment will become more diffused as more people from the developing world join the global online discussion."
(Alberto Masetti–Zannini, p.21,22)

Alberto Masetti–Zannini, Web 2.0 and International Development NGOs
Knowledge Politics Quarterly, Volume 1 Issue 1 (Oct 2007), edited by Craig Berry

TAGS

AfricaAsiablogbloggingblogosphereChinesecivic engagementcommunicationcontent creation • content transfer • democratic participationdiscussionempowermentEnglish languageInternetJapaneseknowledgeknowledge creationlanguageLatin Americamulticultural • multilingual • NGOparticipationsocial constructionismTechnorati • virtual third places • Web 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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