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08 JANUARY 2013

The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology

"A passion for bringing together expertise in the arts, computing and technology is inspiring the University of Greenwich's new Professor of Digital Creativity.

Gregory Sporton, who joins in January [2013] from Birmingham City University, has spent much of his academic career researching the impact of new technology on the visual and performing arts. He is a former professional dancer and has also researched the history of ballet in Soviet times.

He is excited about introducing a new and original focus on the arts to Greenwich. 'I aim to gather together the expertise we have in so many disciplines, such as creative arts, computing, visualisation and all the rest, and make something new and interesting,' Professor Sporton says.

'The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology: there is less differentiation than people think, and at Greenwich I want to build a research environment to explore that."

(University of Greenwich News, 17 December 2012)

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TAGS

2017artsarts and sciences • ballerina • ballet • Birmingham City University • Birmingham Institute of Art and Designbodycomputingcreative artsdancerdigital creativityGreenwich • Gregory Sporton • impact of new technology • institutional strategic agenda • MotivePro Suit • performerperforming artsposture • Professor of Digital Creativity • research agenda • research environmenttraining • University of Greenwich • visual artsvisualisationVisualisation Research Unit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2012

Skillset Academi+ supporting the Welsh creative industries

"Skillset Academi+ was first piloted in Wales from 2009 to March 2011, during which time the scheme assisted over 350 industry professionals by running 54 courses. Having used this opportunity, which was funded by HEFCW, the Academy has fostered new partnerships with experts and has proven a track record of targeted training appealing to a wide cross sector of the industry. In 2012, the second phase of training will be funded by the EU's Convergence European Social Fund (ESF) through the Welsh Government. ...

The impact of digital technology, combined with the recession, has increased the speed of change within the Creative industry, transforming the way in which we operate. The focus of Skillset Academi+ is to enable Welsh companies and freelancers to re–skill through high quality and flexible training that is entirely tailored towards real industry needs in this digital age.

The concept for this training programme draws on hard evidence produced by Skillset on the impact of the recession and changes in digital technology on the Creative Media sector in Wales. Recently gathered research shows which skills are needed to help companies and freelancers weather the economic downturn and come out the other side with a competitive edge.

The content of courses offered by Skillset Academi+ has been shaped by feedback from industry practitioners on priority skills gaps and training needs."

(Skillset Academi+)

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TAGS

2012 • Aberystwyth University • Cardiff Metropolitan University • changes in digital technology • competitive edge • Convergence European Social Fund • CPDcreative industriescreative media industries • creative media sector • Creative Skillsetdigital agedigital technologyeconomic downturneconomic recession • ESF • flexible training • freelancers • HEFCW • impact of the recession • industry needs • industry practitioners • industry professionals • re-skill • skills gaps • Skillset Academi+ • speed of change • Swansea Metropolitan University • targeted training • the way we operate • training • training needs • University of Wales Newport • upskill • Wales • Welsh Government

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2012

Start the Week: Art and Design with Antony Gormley and Ron Arad

"On Start the Week, Andrew Marr explores how Britain trains the artists and designers of the future. Christopher Frayling and Sarah Teasley celebrate the 175th anniversary of the Royal College of Art, the world's oldest art and design school. But one of its former teachers, the industrial designer Ron Arad argues for a broader arts education which doesn't split sculpture from painting, architecture from design. And the artist Antony Gormley redefines the limits of sculpture and building."

(Start the Week, 2012, BBC Radio 4)

BBC Radio 4: Start the Week, duration: 43 minutes, first broadcast: Monday 19 November 2012.

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TAGS

175th anniversary2012Andrew MarranniversaryAntony Gormleyarchitectureart and designart and design schoolart schools • art training • artistsBBC Radio 4BBC Radio 4 • besottedness • broader arts education • celebrationChristopher Fraylingcreative capacity developmentcreative sectorcultural valuedesign trainingdesigners • do work • English BaccalaureateGovernment School of Design • history of art schools • liberal educationpaintingresearch through practice • Robin Darwin • Ron Arad • Royal College of Art • Sarah Teasley • sculptureStart the Week • think work • trainingUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Udemy: crowd learning through microcontent bundles

"There was a time when learning was what we did from birth to college graduation. After that? We just worked and eventually retired.

But the world is changing rapidly. And now, more than ever, learning is something that happens outside the classroom throughout our entire lives.

We now have to learn new skills every year just to stay relevant in our jobs (not to mention making a career change!). And it's not just our careers, we also want to learn and continually improve in the things we do outside of work. Whether it's yoga or golf or photography or anything we're passionate about, we want to be better. Every day we see our friends sharing their new achievements and posting their milestones on Facebook; how do we keep up and reach our potential?

We're busier than ever. And despite having access to a mountain of information via the internet, we still struggle to find structured, comprehensive, trusted sources who can excite us and teach us all the things we want to know. We need trusted experts, guides, to help us on our way – we need the ability to learn from the amazing instructors in the world."

(Udemy)

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TAGS

andragogy • busy lifestyle • career change • changing knowledge landscapeschanging worldcontinuous developmentcrowdlearningdigital education • e-learning bundles • help us on our way • how toinstructionInternet • keeping up • learning • learning capacity • learning the crowd • lifelong learning • maintaining relevance • marketization of educationmicrolearningnew skillsonline courses • our careers • outside the classroom • pedagogyperformativitypersonal development • reaching your potential • reflexive modernisation • reliable instruction • reliable knowledge • reliable sources • self-improvement • sharing achievements • structured content • supplemental learningtailored curriculumtrainingtrusttrust and reliability • trusted experts • trusted guides • trusted sources • trustworthiness • Udemy • virtual learning • wisdom of crowds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Educators who have repeated the same kerning and hand-drawn letterform exercises will find themselves teaching at a school that simply isn't focused on typography anymore

"We are a culture that increasingly questions consumption and advertising, which are at the heart of industrial and graphic design disciplines. We rely on a dynamic and constantly evolving technological platform that touches all aspects of life. There is an increased demand for service–based jobs as our country re–evaluates economic sustainability. People are demanding quality, reflective and meaningful experiences in their world.

Yet design education, as a whole, hasn't embraced these challenges and opportunities.

To be direct and explicit, educators who have taught the same foundation studies courses for years will need to dramatically revamp their courses or face irrelevance. Educators who have repeated the same kerning and hand–drawn letterform exercises will find themselves teaching at a school that simply isn't focused on typography anymore – and tenure notwithstanding, these individuals will find themselves without a role. Educators who are unwilling to retrain themselves will be replaced.

If you are one of these educators, or you work at one of these programs, you may acknowledge these necessary shifts, but find personal action to be difficult. It is difficult. And it's difficult because the shift is large, fundamental and of critical importance. You'll need to read, and take courses, and attend new conferences; you'll need to re–build yourself and your expertise in a new light. You'll go from knowing all of the answers to not even knowing the problems.

But it's no longer a matter of choice. Because if you aren't able to find a new opportunity, a new specialty, and embrace the topics described above, you may soon find yourself alone or replaced. Our subject matter is too important, and our role too fundamental, to leave to the traditions of even great educational movements like the Bauhaus. The subject of design is the humanization of technology, and as long as technological advancements continue, so the pragmatic and day–to–day jobs of designers will continue to morph. And so must design education continue to evolve."

(Jon Kolko, 2010)

Jon Kolko (2010). 'Remapping The Curriculum', AIGA | the professional association for design

AIGA Design Educators Conference "New Contexts/New Practices", October 8–10, 2010, at North Carolina State University in Raleigh

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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