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25 FEBRUARY 2016

Universal resilience patterns in complex networks

"Resilience, a system's ability to adjust its activity to retain its basic functionality when errors, failures and environmental changes occur, is a defining property of many complex systems. Despite widespread consequences for human health, the economy and the environment, events leading to loss of resilience—from cascading failures in technological systems to mass extinctions in ecological networks—are rarely predictable and are often irreversible. These limitations are rooted in a theoretical gap: the current analytical framework of resilience is designed to treat low-dimensional models with a few interacting components, and is unsuitable for multi-dimensional systems consisting of a large number of components that interact through a complex network. Here we bridge this theoretical gap by developing a set of analytical tools with which to identify the natural control and state parameters of a multi-dimensional complex system, helping us derive effective one-dimensional dynamics that accurately predict the system's resilience. The proposed analytical framework allows us systematically to separate the roles of the system's dynamics and topology, collapsing the behaviour of different networks onto a single universal resilience function. The analytical results unveil the network characteristics that can enhance or diminish resilience, offering ways to prevent the collapse of ecological, biological or economic systems, and guiding the design of technological systems resilient to both internal failures and environmental changes."

(Jianxi Gao, Baruch Barzel & Albert-László Barabási, 17 February 2016, Nature)

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TAGS

2016Albert-Laszlo Barabasi • Baruch Barzel • biological systems • cascading failure • Cognitive Visualization Lab • complex networkscomplex systems • critical phenomena • data visualisationdroughtecological balance • ecological networks • ecological sustainability • ecological systems • ecosystemenvironmental changeenvironmental statisticsextinctionglobal issuesIBM • IBM Watson • interrelationships • irreversible change • Jianxi Gao • loss of resilience • Mauro Martino • multidimensional systems • network dynamics • network earth • network ecologynetwork model • network relationships • networked interaction • nonlinear phenomena • Northeastern University • one-dimensional dynamics • phase transitions • resiliencespeciationsustainability • system collapse • technological systems • universal resilience function • universal resilience patterns • visual explanations • visual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising data • wildfire

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2009

Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins

"Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) 'anatomically modern' human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins."

(Gregory Adcock, Elizabeth Dennis, Simon Easteal, Gavin Huttley, Lars Jermiin, William Peacock and Alan Thorne)

Adcock, G. J., E. S. Dennis, et al. (2001). "Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins." Archaeology in Oceania 36(3): 163-163.

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19742001Aboriginal AustraliansAfrica • Alan Thorne • alternative explanation • anatomically modern human • ancient DNA • ancient humans • ancient peoplearchaeology • Archaeology in Oceania • AsiaAustraliaAustralian National University • bone fragments • burial ritual • cell biologychromosome • common ancestor • cremated remains • divergence • divergent selection • divergent variation • DNAEast Africa • Elizabeth Dennis • emergence of modern humans • Europe • evolutionary lineage • evolutionary process • evolutionary theoryevolutionary tree • female skeleton • fixation • fossil evidence • fossil specimen • Gavin Huttley • genetic lineage • genetic pool • genetic relationship • genetic sequence • genome • genotyping analysis • Gregory Adcock • Homo erectus • Homo sapiens • human evolutionhuman history • human populations • human speciesIndiaIndigenous Australians • Lake Mungo • Lars Jermiin • living humans • Mamanwa people • mitochondria • mitochondrial genome • modern human origins • mtDNA lineage • multiregional evolution • multiregional explanation • multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis • Mungo Lady • Mungo Man • New South Walesochre • origin of modern humans • out-of-Africa hypothesis • Papua New GuineaPeoples Republic of China • pleistocene • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) • Simon Easteal • simultaneous development • skeletal remains • skeletonSouth East Asianspeciation • subspecies • William Peacock

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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