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29 FEBRUARY 2016

Hominid: an animated short film teaser

Written and Directed by Brian Andrews; Animation Supervisor: Joe Daniels; Lead Character Technical Director: Rodney Brett; Character Technical Director: Omar Garcia, Rob Garcia, Andrew Manuel; Story Artist: Janine Labar; Animation: Jason Alas, Brittany Barnes, Denice Dehelean, Andrew Manuel, John Treleaven, Tim Xenakis; Shading: Vincent Jaramillo, Matthew Picasso; Modelling: Pedro Ferreira, Dakota Fulmer, Sam Hedberg, Abraham Rodriguez, Joshua Roth, Darrell White; Compositing: Kyle Greenberg, Nate Rodriguez; Dynamic Effects: Tyler Giusti; Sound Design: Bryan Atarama, David Claudio; Composer: Jordan Suhr; Title Design: Adrian Amler, Patches, Angela You; Thanks to: Andrew Dayton, Adrian Miller, John Scanlon, Andrew Schlussel, Josh Qualtieri. Produced at Ex'pression College for Digital Arts. Copyright 2011 Brian Andrews.

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20113D animationanimated sequence • animated short • animated short film • animated teaser • atmospheric presence • bones • Brian Andrews • chase scenecreaturedangerous environments • Expression College for Digital Arts • flying creature • frog • Hominid (2012) • hominidae • hominids • human skeleton • human x-ray • humanoidmonochromatic • photo-composite • sepiaskeletonspiderteaser trailertranslucence • veterinary x-ray • visual style • winged creature • x-ray

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JUNE 2013

The World's Loveliest Advertisement For Death

"Funeral homes are purposely dour, all subdued blacks, hushed grays, and buffed dark cherry wood. It would seem that design flourishes have no part to play in this (non)aesthetic. In Japan, in fact, it's taboo to break this monochromatic code. But a new advertisment for Nishinihon Tenrei funeral parlor goes against the grain.

Produced by ad agency I&S BBDO, the life–sized poster depicts a human skeleton recreated in colorful flower petals set on an arresting white background. Kneecaps are made from sunflowers, links of green leaves trace out rib cages, and arched rows of pink roses form the silhouette of the crown of a skull.

The poster, which recently took home a One Show Design Merit Award, was the brainchild of Mari Nishimura, creative director at I&S BBDO. The idea for the image came from his own experience with death, he tells Co. Design. Nishimura was left with 'profound feelings' of his late father's funeral, which, incidentally enough, was held at the Nishinihon Tenrei funeral parlor."

(Sammy Medina, 29 May 2013, Co.Design)

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advertisment • art directionBBDOcollagecolourdeathdevastating tsunamisflowersfuneral • funeral home • funeral parlour • human skeletonillustrative styleJapanJapanese • Mari Nishimura • Nishinihon Tenrei • One Show Design • petals • posterremembranceskeletontsunami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2009

Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins

"Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) 'anatomically modern' human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins."

(Gregory Adcock, Elizabeth Dennis, Simon Easteal, Gavin Huttley, Lars Jermiin, William Peacock and Alan Thorne)

Adcock, G. J., E. S. Dennis, et al. (2001). "Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins." Archaeology in Oceania 36(3): 163-163.

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19742001Aboriginal AustraliansAfrica • Alan Thorne • alternative explanation • anatomically modern human • ancient DNA • ancient humans • ancient peoplearchaeology • Archaeology in Oceania • AsiaAustraliaAustralian National University • bone fragments • burial ritual • cell biologychromosome • common ancestor • cremated remains • divergence • divergent selection • divergent variation • DNAEast Africa • Elizabeth Dennis • emergence of modern humans • Europe • evolutionary lineage • evolutionary process • evolutionary theoryevolutionary tree • female skeleton • fixation • fossil evidence • fossil specimen • Gavin Huttley • genetic lineage • genetic pool • genetic relationship • genetic sequence • genome • genotyping analysis • Gregory Adcock • Homo erectus • Homo sapiens • human evolutionhuman history • human populations • human speciesIndiaIndigenous Australians • Lake Mungo • Lars Jermiin • living humans • Mamanwa people • mitochondria • mitochondrial genome • modern human origins • mtDNA lineage • multiregional evolution • multiregional explanation • multiregional origin of modern humans hypothesis • Mungo Lady • Mungo Man • New South Walesochre • origin of modern humans • out-of-Africa hypothesis • Papua New GuineaPeoples Republic of China • pleistocene • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) • Simon Easteal • simultaneous development • skeletal remains • skeletonSouth East Asianspeciation • subspecies • William Peacock

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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