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Which clippings match 'Expository Addendum' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 DECEMBER 2014

BBC launches new interactive drama Footballers United

"Footballers United features five chapters which consist of video, audio, image and text content, with the overall experience being around 60 minutes. Archived content is presented by well-known football player Gemma Fay, Captain and Goalkeeper of the Scottish National Women's Football team. ...

Audience interaction: Each part of the story is a standalone piece of content which is shareable online. A clever interactive timeline prompts the audience to access related archive content, such as images, text and video. When selected, this content appears as an overlay on the screen, with the drama paused in the background.

For a more personal experience the audience can sign in via Facebook and the timeline maps events in WW1 to their social media graph; showing how their friends and a modern day social community would have fared throughout the war. For example, when the viewer pass the first day of the Somme in the drama, a social item will appear that shows the number of their friends that would have lost their lives had they been in the battle at the time."

(BBC Media Centre, 11 December 2014)

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TAGS

2014 • a whole generation • Alex Winckler • archive footageaudience interactionBBC History • BBC Learning • BBC Taster • changes for women • changing lives • creative nonfiction • culture change • curated content • devastating effects • digital storytelling • docu-fiction • docufictionEdinburghexpository addendum • factual format • factually accurate narrative • fictional and archived content • football player • football teamFootballers United (2014) • Gemma Fay • Heart of Midlothian (football team) • historical drama • Holly Jack • interactive digital narrativesinteractive dramainteractive features • interactive guide • interactive mediainteractive storytellinginteractive timeline • iWonder • Keiran Gallacher • Leah Byrne • linear drama • literary nonfiction • multimedia storytelling • narrative nonfiction • new responsibilities • new sense of freedom • online multimedia • playing football • related archive content • Robert Armitage • Scotland • Scottish National Womens Football • supporting content • Tim Wright • timeline • true story • World War Iyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2008

Problems of Annotation in a Digital Ulysses

"The footnote, once considered the treasure of a special artistic talent, has sunk in reputation to a bauble at the bottom of a scholar's page. And yet a footnote––an expository addendum to the text, an annotation, a reference––exhibits a fascinatingly complex set of possible relationships with the text to which it refers. When a text like James Joyce's Ulysses enters the picture, and digital hypermedia is the medium, the entire question of footnotes and annotations needs to be rethought."
(Michael Groden, 2004)

TAGS

annotationcommunication • digital hypermedia • digital mediaexpository addendumfootnotehyperlinkhypermediainteractive mediaJames JoyceJoycean hypertextlinkmultimedianew mediarelationshiptext • Ulysses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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