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Which clippings match 'Annotation' keyword pg.1 of 5
07 OCTOBER 2012

Open Urban: Know Your City - Map, Inform, Discuss

"OpenUrban is the first open source user–generated web map and forum focusing on current and proposed urban development. It is a web platform for civic collaboration, a venue for debate, and an outlet and archive for information on urban development. We embrace crowd sourcing technology as a means to inform and empower. By combining written media with spatial information OpenUrban creates a powerful tool for people to understand how their cities are changing and supports their active participation in that change."

(OpenUrban, 2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JULY 2012

Communicating and discovering insight through reflective journals

A reflective journal is both a communication tool and a design method for developing professional practice. Such journals allow designers to publish their projects as they progress and provide a platform for critically reflecting on creative works and the design process.

Reflective journals can be used to discover insight about how designers approach their creative problem–solving. This is commonly understood as a central requirement for designers to develop their professionalism and to become experts in the field. They do so through reflecting on their work – characterising common features and critically analysing successes and failures.

Reflective journals also help designers situate their work within the broader creative industries and contemporary visual culture context. Designers might use their journal to document developing trends and to collect examples of inspirational works. These collections might be made as part of the research phase of a given project or contribute to a more general understanding of a design field.

Such journals should take an appropriate form so that they communicate effectively and provide necessary insight. They might exist in a singular form e.g. a workbook, a weblog or they might exist as a collection e.g. as a workbook of sketches with notes/annotations and as a weblog/Tumblr of photographs/videos with associated critical reflections.

The following are examples of art and design reflective journals:

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

Annotate That! content commentary and sharing application

"Annotate That! is a free unique annotating service. Share web pages, images or documents with others and add your comments using annotations. Simply click on the web page or medium to make your annotation."

(Dean Claydon, We Create Digital)

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TAGS

add your comments • annotate • Annotate That! • annotating service • annotationannotation serviceannotationsaugmentationaugmentative communicationaugmented contentcomment systemcontent sharingcooperative design knowledgecritical commentarycritique • Dean Claydon • digital contentembellishmenterasurehypermediacyinformation sharinginterpretationjuxtapositionlayerlayeredlayering • make your annotation • metadataorganisationoverlaypalimpsestreinterpretationresearch toolsharesharing and distributing knowledge • sharing application • sharing ideasstackingtext layers • We Create Digita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

JISC Final Report: Enhancing the VADS Image Collection

"The project had three overarching aims: to improve image searching and retrieval; to enable VADS images to be accessed more easily; and to facilitate increased use of the collection by academics. To achieve this, the project has developed OAI–PMH capabilities on the VADS database; developed and applied a general top level hierarchical taxonomy to the VADS collections; implemented a combination of controlled terms and free to edit user tags; and enabled academic users to create, annotate and publish their own image sets. "

(Amy Robinson, August 2009, p.4)

Fig.1 French photographer, JR.

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TAGS

2009 • academic users • academicsannotationcollections • controlled terms • databasedigitisation • easy access • enhancing the VADS • folksonomy • free to edit user tags • funded project • hierarchical taxonomy • image annotation • image collectionimage database • image publishing • image retrieval • image searchingimage setsJISCOAI-PMHonline collectionsearchsearch and retrievaltaxonomy • user tags • VADS • VADS database

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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